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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
**Update in post 12 & better pics**

I picked this up at a local pawn shop. Ser # 6894xx dating to 1943 per Colts Ser # look up. I was wondering what the "G 505 E" markings on the butt stood for or any other info on these?

I also notice if I tighten down the frame screws too much, the side plate pinches the internals not allowing the trigger to return. Is there a fix for this?
Thanks.



 

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Interesting stamping. Never seen one like it before, but it looks pretty professional; letters and numbers are somewhat misaligned, so probably not factory. The gun likely shipped by the time when there were no more commercial shipments due to the war, and the markings were applied by whichever agency received it. The finish looks in really good shape for a war-time gun.

Your gun is from late 1941 or very early 1942, by the way. Forget the Colt look-up for the war years. As a benchmark, 696000 has a date of manufacture of March 26, 1942. It's a bit too early for those brown plastic Commando stocks.

Sorry, can't help with the mechanics.
 

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I have a 6 inch Heavy Barrel OP #699XXX marked GE 16 with a 21 on the bottom of the left stock and a 7 on the right, and I have seen another like it for sale. I thought it might stand for General Electric. The font on mine looks very similar to yours.
Regards,
Tecolote
 

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Something in the lockwork is misaligned and not seated fully home so it is against the side plate and binds when the screws are tight.
I bought a late model New Service very cheaply for that very reason; the rebound lever had not been placed properly on the step on the back of the hand. The guy was an idiot and called me a liar when I showed it to him after I bought it for a nominal fee. I just smiled and thanked him for showing his *** in public. I was around the show for several more hours and I didn't see anyone stop at his table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Something in the lockwork is misaligned and not seated fully home so it is against the side plate and binds when the screws are tight.
I bought a late model New Service very cheaply for that very reason; the rebound lever had not been placed properly on the step on the back of the hand. The guy was an idiot and called me a liar when I showed it to him after I bought it for a nominal fee. I just smiled and thanked him for showing his *** in public. I was around the show for several more hours and I didn't see anyone stop at his table.
Thanks. Someone PM'd me with this solution, but that isn't the issue. I did notice the trigger pin hole in the side plate is a little egged out. Maybe the trigger is mis-aligned because of it?
 

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First disassemble the innards and clean all the parts, reassemble. If it is still an issue then the only part I can think of that might cause the bind is the hand rubbing against the sideplate. Take the side plate off, see if the hand is fully inserted into the trigger and the rebound lever is flush and tight to the hand. Then lube the recess in the sideplate that the hand guides in, then retighten. If that works then great, if not try to polish the recess in the sideplate that the hand guides in, just a little at a time.
 

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I have a PP 32 that has the same problem, it is the trigger pin and trigger that is worn and it binds when returning. I played with it and finally removed the "positive" safety linkage. That was adding to the bind. it works well now, just keeping in mind that it is not as the barrel label says.
 

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I thought these would letter back as being sent to the DSC?....
That could have gone either way during that time period.

From the time the DSC established the "revolver program" in late 1941 through later 1942, the DSC ordered and received significant quantities of OPs at its warehouses and acted as a physical distributor. Those generally letter to the DSC, although I have seen at least one letter from September 1942 that showed the OPs sold to a private corporation, but shipped to the DSC.

However, starting at the latest in March 1942, they appear to have also cleared shipments from the factory to approved end users directly. I have a letter for an OP from a shipment of 25 that went to a commercial distributor in Philadelphia most likely for the PA State Police, on March 28, 1942. The letter does not mention the DSC, but given the legal situation on that date, it has to have been a DSC-authorized deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
So I did figure out my problem. The hand was rubbing against the side plate and binding on return. The hand looked warped. Right or wrong, I ended-up thinning it out where it was rubbing. It works great now.






Worn the other day for CCW and backed-up by a model 36.

 
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