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Indeed, a beautiful example. The magazine is the only thing I see that is probably something not original a shipped. It's a pinned base magazine. Colt may have had some 4-5 yr. old magazines laying around, but I'm not sure how one would ever establish that.

Regardless, the market determined the price this one brought. I'm sure both the buyer and consignor are thrilled with the results of the auction. They both got what they wanted. And it looks like a few other guys wanted it pretty badly, too. Nobody likes to end up in 2nd place bidding.
 

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Scott...please address the missing parts of the rampant colt and the roll marks on the right side of the slide?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Roll die!!! Roll dies ware out. I have four 1947 and they all have some broken letters on the right side and different stages of degradation of the pony. More than one person has passed on a Colt not knowing the difference between a worn die and a re-blue job. I have documented that in 1917 above 87xxxC and below 87000C the words GOVERNMENT MODEL on the right sides of the frame display the degradation of a worn die.
 

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Some guy's have more $$$$ than sense? fwiw
I have been offered alot for my Colt 1911 Navy. I'll keep it and my Rand too!
 

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Johnny is spot on regarding the aggressive final polish at the factory on those pistols. I've got a several early postwar pistols that have light markings due to final polish. The polishers, I believe, took it just as far as they possibly could.

It kind of reminds me of cleaning off light surface rust. If you clean it to the point you can tell it's been cleaned, you've probably gone too far. However, Colt was re-establishing their commercial sales right after the war, after being suspended for about 4 years. They were competing with their prewar polish and finish. That was a tough act to follow.

Here are some of my early postwar guns with light markings.

1946 C220021...the 21st postwar GM




1946 C220507...is about new condition.



Talk about lightly-struck GOVERNMENT MODEL markings...those two above are so light they virtually are not there. :) Actually, the GM marking wasn't even applied to the very earliest 1946 pistols.

1947 C228461...a lightly struck right side slide marking.


1948 C232782...new in the box




On this past pistol, you'll notice most of the right side slide marking is light, due to final polish...especially the end with the rampant colt. This pistol also has the correct early postwar magazines with the prewar-type base marking, BUT they are welded base...not pinned. I think the very early postwar guns used surplus WWII mags, some of which were polished out and reblued. Then as supplies dwindled, I think Colt went back to using their prewar base die with welded mags. That, apparently only lasted a short while, as you almost never see those magazines.
 

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Colt also had more than one roll die at the time available. The dies tended to break more than wear out. Additionally, looks like the final polish was a little aggressive.
That was my thought too. It also seems that the depth of the roll mark are uneven and when polished like Colt did up too the 1980's or so, parts of the roll marks would be faint or disappear.
My old Series 70 .45 has a faint letter and I had a Combat Commander that had parts of letters buffed off.
 

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Does anybody know the stories behind 70 year old guns that are virtually new?

I doubt they were bought as an investment and squirreled away because they were so common back then. Perhaps they were forgotten by the original owner or buried in a large collection. I am not doubting the condiction, but I do not understand how it happens.
 

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Does anybody know the stories behind 70 year old guns that are virtually new?

I doubt they were bought as an investment and squirreled away because they were so common back then. Perhaps they were forgotten by the original owner or buried in a large collection. I am not doubting the condiction, but I do not understand how it happens.
That's the beauty of collecting. There have been collectors for much longer than 70 years. Guns do get squirreled away, and many end up not being excessively handled or fired over long periods of time. I've got 100 year old guns in the same condition. Someone before me had them and preserved them. Guns like that tend to sell for more than the average "shooter" is willing to pay to have a gun to shoot. So, normally, the highest condition guns, when properly marketed, will be sold to "collectors" who continue to preserve for the next generation.

I've got plenty of guns to shoot. I only have two hands. :) But I have far more guns I consider truly collectible, worthy of preserving. This has gone on since firearms were first developed, and I expect it will always be the case.
 
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