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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an earlier thread I was asked by the Judge to post some more detailed pictures of the grips that are on Python Serial #21. Below are my observations.

1) There is no "fitting ledge" on the grips
2) the medallions sit above to almost flush to the surface of the grips
3) there are no serial numbers written on the inside, just a stamp on each grip. The RH grip has a "J" Impression stamp and the LH grip has "L"(or could be an "I" or "E" ) you be the judge
4) The fitting and mating of the right hand and left hand grip is exceptional
5) Both Left & Right had grips appear to have been crafted form a single wood blank. The grain matches all the way across

I have not cleaned these grips but I think that they would show more of the wood grain if I did. I am frankly afraid of ruining them if I cleaned them. in their current state they look excellent and the gun and the grips have survived remarkably well for being 58 Years old.
 

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Mike, those stocks are spectacular!

Thanks for showing.

I clean wood stocks with lukewarm running water, a soft bristle toothbrush, and Murphy's Oil Soap, let dry, then saturate with Pledge Rejuvenating Oil, let dry, then sometime I apply Renaissance Wax, buff, then reinstall the stocks. That said, I have left the older, darker colored Colt full checkered stocks unwashed for the reason Prostrok mentioned. Well, that is what I would have done, had I not lost all of my guns in that terrible boating accident.
 

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The first Combat Magnum completed by S&W on December 15, 1955, K260003. It was kept in the factory collection and sent to Alvin White in 1962 for engraving and gold/silver inlay to be presented to President John F. Kennedy. The side plate features the Great Seal of the United States and the left side of the frame features an anchor since President Kennedy was in the Navy in WW II. The stocks were made by Alvin White and also feature gold S&W monograms, stock screw and escutcheon. President Kennedy never received this "one of a kind" revolver and it was owned by several collectors before I acquired it.

Bill



 

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Colt used the First Type Target grips from 1953 to about 1960-61.

With Gold medallions they were used on the Python from introduction in 1955 to 1961.
With Silver medallions they were used on the Officer's Model Match, 357 Model, and original Trooper from 1953 to 1961.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I think they are one of the best looking grips I've seen.
I agree, and in my opinion they feel better than any other grip I have felt on a Python. I haven't shot these and don't plan to, so I can't give you a range report :) but I am sure some of the other members can. If you examine them closely you can see why they would have become unaffordable for Colt to continue producing. All follow design changes seemed to have been focused on cost reductions rather that quality style.
 

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A major reason for the change was because the First Type grips caused problems with loading and especially unloading due to interference with the grips.
As speedloaders came on the market few of them would work at all with the First Type grips.

That, and the cost of all the checkering caused Colt to change to the Second Type Target grips with the "thumb rest", actually a loading clearance, on the left side.
Many people think the Second Type were the most attractive and usable of the Colt Target grips.
 
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