Colt Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All,

I would greatly appreciate some advice from folks with knowledge of the Python, in particular an early model with the old type ejector assembly.

Essentially the "problem" is this: my 1962's knurled head is very loose. It takes the slightest bit of torque to be applied to it and it starts to turn.

I shoot the gun very sparingly, maybe 30 rounds a year, to preserve it as best i can - and that means only ever light target loads of 2.5 grains of Somchem S121 (roughly equal to your Bullseye) under a 148 gr DBWC. Even with this light recoiling load it takes about 2 -3 shots before the head starts to unscrew itself, to the point where i've got to be careful that the unscrewed head doesn't get caught in the ejector housing and trap the cylinder.

I have checked that the threads haven't been stripped but they look just fine to me.

Any solutions? I've had suggestions of non-permanent Loctite...
 

·
W.E.Coyote Acme Computer Genius
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
I used the "Blue" Loctite, no more issues and it can still be removed if necessary.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
15,543 Posts
As above the Blue Loctite is a permanent repair.
You can also tighten it firmly in place and if done properly it won't loosen.

To tighten, put three EMPTY cases in the cylinder to protect the ejector rod splines. Wrap the ejector rod head in sheet copper, brass, or leather.
Grip the rod head with pliers and tighten snuggly but not so tight that you risk stripping things.

The least risky and easyist method is the Loctite.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,169 Posts
Number 4 with the suggestion of blue loctite. It takes quite bit of torque to break the blue loctite bond, but is not permanent.
 
  • Like
Reactions: spacecoast1

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
301 Posts
Agree 100% with blue Loctite but you need to clean both parts with Denatured Alcohol or Loctite will not work correctly. Use apiece of leather in the jaws of your pliers and put the empty shells evenly spaced in the cylinder to protect the ejector rod splines. Just don’t use to much force. Re-oil after your done.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top