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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1970\'s GCNM

It is my understanding that the Gold Cup National Match has a lighter frame and slide than the standard GM's. Because of this the GCNM is a weaker firearm and should not fire full power 230 gr ammo (regardless of recoil spring change). It is a lighter, target firearm and should be limited to lightweight target ammo.

Is this correct?

If so what has Colt done to the frame and slide to "lighten" things up?

I'm talking 1970's vintage GCNM.
 

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Re: 1970\'s GCNM

Your understanding is wrong. The Gold Cup frame and slide are essentially the same as a standard Government Model.

Shooting 230 grain ammunition is fine provided the standard recoil spring is installed.
 

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Re: 1970\'s GCNM

Seems to me some of the first Colt National Match 1911's had slides with some metal milled out, but I don't think they made that many of them. I know by the time the Series 70 came out Colt had ceased such procedures. The only lightweight receiver Colt has ever made has been the aluminum alloy Commander and Officer's models. All of their steel and stainless receivers are of normal weights, no extra metal removed. Don't worry about shooting 230 grain ammo in your Gold Cup. I do suggest installing a 16 pound spring for 230 grain ammo at factory velocity (850 fps). Also, watch the pin that holds the rear sight, they sometimes drift out under recoil. Watch the front sight for signs of loosening, the staked on sight sometimes comes loose under recoil.

[This message has been edited by stans (edited 06-03-2004).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Re: 1970\'s GCNM

Thanks for the feedback.

The piece in question has a serial number on the barrel which matches the frame serial number. Nice touch of class.

The recoil spring has 28 coils and measures about 5.65 inches in length.
 
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