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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm having a small issue I don't know if it's a problem or the way it is supposed to be. The assembly of screw, spring, and detent that hold the crane on the frame is loose. If I tighten the screw, the cylinder will not swing out easily. There appears to be some lithium white dried grease where the detent makes contact.

What gives?
 

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PhillipM, welcome to Coltforum.

I suspect you have a buildup of old, dry lubricants in your gun. Try flushing it out with a solvent. I like Eezox, is it works as a solvent when wet, then a lubricant and rust preventative when dry, a one-product gun cleaner. If that is all it is, some dried lubricant, after the flushing and cleaning, you can tighten down the screw and the cylinder should move fine.

http://www.coltforum.com/forums/col...-colt-double-action-internals.html#post330768
 

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Also, check the detent for damage, and try to determine if the spring is original.
These get lost and people stick in whatever they can find.

Also, as above clean the shaft of the crane and inspect it for damage. Clean the shaft hole in the frame, but don't allow any solvent to leak into the action.

After cleaning, lubricate the crane shaft, install the cylinder assembly and check for free movement before re-installing the detent, spring, and cap screw.
Put a dab of grease on the tip of the detent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses and the welcome. I have cleaned the shaft hole with q-tips till it is perfectly clean, cleaned the crane shaft, oiled the crane shaft, and applied some grease to the detent. The spring appears to be correct, it is attached to the detent.

Unfortunately all that has been in vain. The screw has to be loosened 1/2 turn for the crane to swing freely. The only other thing I can see is with the cylinder closed, the groove for the detent is not centered in the hole, but just a tad forward. I appears tightening the detent would force the crane to the rear.

It's a nickel gun if that makes a difference.
 

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I have never seen the spring "attached" to the detent. It can be taken out-it usually just falls out when you take it out. I would take the little spring completely out of the detent and clean it real good, and clean inside the tiney hollow cavity of the little detent sleeve. It might be that some rust or crud or something got down in there between the little,hollow,detent and the spring. Maybe that crud,makes for too much pressure on the spring when you tighten the outside screw all the way,thus binding the cylinder shaft.
 

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Are you sure you have the correct spring?
And as capstan said, it should be able to be inserted in and out freely from the detent.

It's a tiny thing -- just a smidge longer than the detent itself.

Also, the v-groove in the crane shaft should be centered in the hole, not offset.
Is it possible that you have the wrong crane shaft installed, and/or is it possible that the shaft is not all the way back due to an obstruction or peening of the end of the shaft? Just asking questions...

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Ah ha! Thanks for the picture, someone has indeed lost the spring and replaced it with the wrong one. Where do I get another? Numrich is sold out.

Next question, the hammer pin is sitting too far in how do I fix this?

Gun Firearm Trigger Revolver Starting pistol

On edit: I cut off a few coils and it seems fine now!
 

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Next question, the hammer pin is sitting too far in how do I fix this?

You don't...and neither does your local gunsmith.
This is a SERIOUS issue and requires the gun be sent back to Colt for a proper repair.

Frame hammer and trigger pins are pressed in at the factory with special press devices using fitted support dies to prevent bending or bulging the frame, and to prevent over-sizing the frame hole.
To find a Python with the hammer pin like that raises very serious questions about possible damage to the gun.

A major question is WHY someone did this.
Did they attempt to remove the pin and fail, or did they attempt to install a pin and fail. Hammer pins very seldom break, so why attempt removal or replacement?
The usual Billy Bob The Gunsmith will attempt to drive frame pins in and out with a hammer and punch, which can ruin the frame.

Another question is, if the pin isn't fully seated, how did they get the side plate back on.
Colt side plates have holes for the pins to fit into buy usually if a pin isn't fully seated the side plate won't seat into the frame.
Question is, did they shorten the pin or deepen the side plate hole?

This is one of those unfortunate things that really do require sending the gun into Colt to have them check it out and correct it.
These are serious questions that need to be looked at by the real experts.
DO NOT take the gun to ANY local gunsmith. They don't have the specialized tooling or Colt knowledge to diagnose and correct the issues, and Pythons are simply to valuable these days to risk.

While it's there, have them replace the crane detent spring.
They will also give the gun a total inspection and deep cleaning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's a Detective Special, not a Python (I wish it was!), but your point is taken.

It also has some scratches on the side plate from the ejector star dragging on it so I may as well get a new nickel job while its there.

What are the best steps to send it in? I understand one of there guys is a member here, is this so?
 

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It's a Detective Special

Sorry, I've had Python on the brain all day.

The Colt web site has detail on the process of sending a Colt in to the factory. They may not be doing any refinish work until later in the month, but that was mostly bluing work.

Colt's Manufacturing LLC

Basic process is:

You're allowed to ship a pistol to the manufacturer for repair, and they can ship it direct back to you. You don't need an FFL Dealer involved.

You have to ship via UPS or Fed-Ex.
You CANNOT mail it through the US Post Office, only a FFL Dealer can mail pistols.
Unfortunately UPS and Fed-Ex demand the fastest shipping method which is overnight. Cost is high.
If you are friendly with an FFL he can mail it cheap for you, and depending on what he charges, you can get it there cheaper.

If you ship via UPS or Fed-Ex, you MUST tell them the package contains a gun. Lie to them and tell them it's "machine parts" or something else so you can avoid the high gun shipping charge, and if the gun is lost, stolen, or damaged they will pay you NOTHING because you defrauded them and violated the shipping contract.

You have to take the package to a UPS or Fed-Ex shipping center. UPS Stores will not handle guns.

Be prepared for some UPS or Fed-Ex counter person to tell you you can't ship a gun. Ask for a higher up until you get to one who knows their own shipping rules. You CAN legally ship.

Write up a SHORT letter detailing what's wrong with the gun and what you want done, such as a refinish.
Be specific about the problem and whatever you want done, but keep it short and to the point.
Number each point as in #1 Repair hammer pin, #2 refinish with bright nickel, etc.
This prevents someone missing something you want that's buried in the letter.

Include your name and address and contact info like email number, date shipped, and the make model and serial number of the gun on the letter.
Put the letter WITH the gun in a heavy plastic bag.
This is so you have contact into inside if it gets lost, and there's no chance the letter detailing what you want is misplaced.

Don't send any original boxes, custom grips, or anything else.

Pack the gun like Godzilla is going to be using the box as a club on King Kong.
Wrap the gun in a good box so no amount of shifting can allow contact with the box. This prevents any chance of damage.

Make sure the box is medium size to help prevent theft, and use PLENTY of strong security type tape. No duct tape.

Tape a label with your address and Colt's address on the box and cover with clear tape. This is so if the shipper label gets lost or defaced.
DON'T put the name COLT on the outside. Use the address format shown on Colt's site.

Colt will examine the gun and send you an invoice specifying what they will do and how much it will cost.
When you pay, it goes into the repair stream.

Be aware that when Colt ships the gun back, UPS and Fed-Ex are well known to just drop the package on your door step or even with a neighbor no matter what the signature requirements are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I consulted my not so local gunsmith that has my complete confidence and pointed him to this thread. He said, "Yeah, that has to go to Colt." I've got a 1974 Series 70 mk IV that needs a reblue and a 22 New Frontier that has a hammer face with grinding marks that will take the bite out of shipping. I have a business and a FedEx number so I'll send them that way.
 
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