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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was getting this out to clean and I realized, I have never really known what I own here.

This is a 1974 python but the trigger, latch, and hammer are gold plated. The barrell rool mark are also.

Was this ever offered as a factory option, was it custom shop, or done by some guy in a garage?
 

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I have seen this addressed before on the Forum. I would say that it is highly unlikely that Colt applied the gold to the small parts on that Python.

Only a factory letter would tell you for sure because you can never say never with Colt.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have seen this addressed before on the Forum. I would say that it is highly unlikely that Colt applied the gold to the small parts on that Python.

Only a factory letter would tell you for sure because you can never say never with Colt.
i have never lettered a gun, but if this was sent back to custom shop would a letter even show that? I have read a few post in past but don’t remember anything definitive.
 

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I believe a "archive letter" would only show the original specifications as the gun was built.

If done later, even by the Custom Shop, the only proof would be a receipt from Colt at the time the services were performed.
 

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In the late 70s I carried a Colt Python as my duty weapon on our local PD and worked part time at Judge’s Gun Shop in Winchester, TN. Freddie Hassebrock was the lead gunsmith at the shop. He was experimenting/perfecting his gold playing techniques and we gold plated the hammer and trigger on my Python. Sure wish I had pictures but that was way before cell phones or digital photography and taking pictures of everything.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Camarokid,:

Do not peruse the Python thread very often, but the title of your post caught my attention. I have a 6" Python from about the same manufacture date, with the same gold colored trigger, cylinder release and hammer, minus the gold roll lettering. Had never seen another one until your post. No one that I talked to had see one either. Interesting ?? Special run; custom shop?
Bought mine in a pawn shop in the early 80's. Think I paid around $275.00 for it. No box or anything, but thought it looked good. Didn't know anything about Colt's or Pythons; thought they all looked like that. It is a safe queen. Now your post has perked my interest. No good with pics, but mine is in like new condition like yours, just the 6"model.
Maybe some Python experts on the forum can shed some light.
 

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Since 1840 Colt would do whatever custom work a customer could pay for.
I'm sure that some people have requested gold plating of parts, but I doubt that Colt ever made any standard production Pythons with gold plating.

In all cases I've ever seen a Python with gold plating was a factory made commemorative or something done by a company like "America Remembers", who buy standard production firearms and have them embellished by custom shops that do gold plating and electro-etching.
These all had more custom engraving or work then just a few plated parts.

The most likely case is something an owner had done after it left the factory.
Of course, you can buy a Colt Archive letter that will list in what configuration a pistol was when it left Colt, but I'd bet the letter would not list any gold work.
 

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Thank you dfariswheel for your post. I agree with your "most likely case" scenario. Original owner perhaps had seen a commemorative gun and thought it would be nice to enhance the appearance of there Python. Although interested, I am not that inquisitive to pay for a Colt Archive letter and find out if it left the factory as an all blued Python.

Your opinion and expertise is just as valuable and useful to me as a Archive letter. Verdict: Done by someone after purchase to dress up the Python. Probably hurt the value, but that is okay. Do not have much invested and enjoy the gun.

Appreciate your expert advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Honestly, I kind of like the look as something different. I have a friend that can gold plate parts so I’m having him Redue the ones on this gun. I guess I’m just stupid. This talk about ruining value with customation and non-shooting just boggles my brain. Hell maybe I should just stick my guns in safe and hope they are worth a retirement one day. Naaa... I’ll stick with shooting them and quick drawing to impress the wife. It’s the only thing I do quick that impresses her.
 

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I don't generally like gold decorations that much but this is really, really nice!
Love the way the accents look both understated and celebratoy.
A beauty!

-Garth
 

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30 or 40 years ago it was the style to have the trigger and hammer gold plated. One of the guys in our shooting club was the repairman for a local jewelry store, and had a steady business of plating small parts for handguns. There was a lighting fixture plant in a nearby town that had a plating department, and more than a few nice old guns sported a nickel plate with gold plated small parts.
 

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Interesting point. My gun would fit that approximate time frame. Gives the gun, in my opinion, a nice look, without over doing it. As for what it does or does not do regarding value, that is not important. Bought it because I liked its looks. As mentioned previously, did not know anything about Colt's or Pythons when I bought it, so was not looking as an investment. Like my other guns, bought them all because I liked there looks/quality or capability. When I decide to sell them, unlikely I will break even, but that is okay. Will make a couple bucks on two or three. They have provided enjoyment over the years.
 

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JohnnyP: Agree with you completely. Wish I could say that I never paid to much, but that is not the case. Discretionary dollars often times lead to poor decision making. Or not; it brought enjoyment.

I like the look of it as does the Camarokid regarding his Python. It is all in the "eye of the beholder".
 
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