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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I could use some help from the forum members on coming up with a value for a Gold Cup NM MK IV Series 70 . It is in excellent condition to include bluing, grips, and operation. The only flaw I can find is the grip safety has a bit of the "plum" coloring. The pistol has one Colt mag, no box, no tool.

The problem I have is trying to figure what is the difference between a $1200 Gold Cup and a $2000 Gold Cup and higher. I realize that having the original box, manual, and tool is part of that. I've spent quite a bit of time on Gunbroker, but come away even more confused. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

Azrider
 

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The bigger money goes to the early pistols (pre Series 70) and the Gold Cups chambered in .38 Special
Adding the original box and paperwork obviously adds to the value. Some of the special run's like the Royal Gold Cup also increase the value.
 

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I think the answer lies in Colt's description: Earlier Models (1970-1983) are referred to as MKIV/SERIES 70 GOLD CUP NATIONAL MATCH. Guns of era (1983-1996) are referred to as : MKIV SERIES 80 GOLD CUP NATIONAL MATCH. And the latest are referred to as GOLD CUP NATIONAL MATCH O SERIES 70.. There are sub models inside each category listed above for special runs etc.The big $ seems to be reserved for the "NATIONAL MATCH, (1957-1970), AND MKII/MKIII NATIONAL MATCH MID-RANGE, (1961-1971).. Of course the earlier the Mfg. the higher the price; Condition-Condition-Condition.
 

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Not to be critical, but if you are describing "Colt's description" of the .38 Mid Range pistols, they were not called MKII or MKIII by Colt. They were called "Gold Cup National Match" chambered in .38 special midrange. The MKII and MKIII are just barrel revisions during their production history.
 

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For the purposes of the request, the aforementioned was provided not as a HISTORICAL fact, but to address the variations, in hopes the OP can help determine value. (Reference being the BLUE BOOK OF GUN VALUES, 37th Edition.)
 

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Values...especially on venues such as Gunbrokers...is all over the place depending on what the seller thinks its worth...whether he has an inflated sense of value or wants to sell the gun. I think a nice pistol that's, let us say, a 97% example...will sell for X amount of dollars. To receive value for a 99% example takes more dollars. Getting to 100% that's honest and verifiable takes a whole bunch more dollars.

I think pricing can be difficult. Condition is everything. I just purchased a 1976 Series 70 Gold Cup National Match from a local auction. It's in overall 90%-95% to my untrained eye on such things. It came with no box, generic 1911 stocks, a no-name magazine and a GI mainspring housing with a lanyard loop. It was no problem matching it up with a genuine Colt magazine and a different mainspring housing (still an arched housing as I prefer that). I also replaced all the springs as I have no idea how many rounds it's launched over the years. I also put on it a modern set of G10 stocks I had.

My investment? $550 from the auction plus a new spring kit, swapping a Colt magazine I already had plus a different mainspring housing and stocks. I originally considered flipping the pistol for a profit but the condition is so nice I decided to keep it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Values...especially on venues such as Gunbrokers...is all over the place depending on what the seller thinks its worth...whether he has an inflated sense of value or wants to sell the gun. I think a nice pistol that's, let us say, a 97% example...will sell for X amount of dollars. To receive value for a 99% example takes more dollars. Getting to 100% that's honest and verifiable takes a whole bunch more dollars.

I think pricing can be difficult. Condition is everything. I just purchased a 1976 Series 70 Gold Cup National Match from a local auction. It's in overall 90%-95% to my untrained eye on such things. It came with no box, generic 1911 stocks, a no-name magazine and a GI mainspring housing with a lanyard loop. It was no problem matching it up with a genuine Colt magazine and a different mainspring housing (still an arched housing as I prefer that). I also replaced all the springs as I have no idea how many rounds it's launched over the years. I also put on it a modern set of G10 stocks I had.

My investment? $550 from the auction plus a new spring kit, swapping a Colt magazine I already had plus a different mainspring housing and stocks. I originally considered flipping the pistol for a profit but the condition is so nice I decided to keep it.

Mr. Whiplash,

Congratulations on your Gold Cup find! Sounds like you got a great deal.

As for my question, trying to establish a fair value for a 1976 Colt Gold Cup, is difficult. My confusion stems from the comparison between the vintage GC that I have to the newer versions. I think a minimum of $1200 is my fair price.

Thanks to all who replied to my question. I appreciate it.

Azrider
 

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A little off thread but one way of looking at the money angle is in 1979 I bought one new. I was getting out of college and starting an family and career so was no longer playing with bullseye shooting. Still a friend and fellow shooter who was a gunsmith and owned a gun store had gotten in a new GCNM. There was a variation in quality from pistol to pistol back then and the fit and finish on this guy was nice so I bought it for $369. In 2015 I bought one of the new GCNM Series 70s that Colt came out with for just over $1.1K. Now the interesting thing is if I use a inflation calculator then $369 in 1979 is just over $1.2K in 2015 dollars.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Dakota,

Excellent response. That is pretty much where I ended up at, $1,200, even though mine is used, but in excellent condition for those folks who like the 1970s era Colt Gold Cup..

Thanks again to all who have responded.

azrider
 

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I’m sure the newer guns are fine but I would not swap any of my older GCs or my NM for two of the newer versions. My preference is purely stubbornness. Old guys are allowed to be that way and we are saving the new stuff for younger folks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Storm2,

I am an official "old guy" and I know exactly what you mean. There is something to be said for a holding a well made piece of blued steel with finely checkered grips.


Azrider
 

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Researched this myself recently when trading for a 70 series. Definitely higher prices realized on earlier guns, even within 70 series variations in prefix vs suffix s/n.
 

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A little off thread but one way of looking at the money angle is in 1979 I bought one new. I was getting out of college and starting an family and career so was no longer playing with bullseye shooting. Still a friend and fellow shooter who was a gunsmith and owned a gun store had gotten in a new GCNM. There was a variation in quality from pistol to pistol back then and the fit and finish on this guy was nice so I bought it for $369. In 2015 I bought one of the new GCNM Series 70s that Colt came out with for just over $1.1K. Now the interesting thing is if I use a inflation calculator then $369 in 1979 is just over $1.2K in 2015 dollars.

$369 in 1979, I think in 1977-78 the list was around $325, that's when I bought mine, still have it, but it does not look as nice as yours, but still shoots lights out.
 
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