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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, new to the forum and looking for some help here. I'll try to include all the information I can think of.
I took my king cobra to the range on Tuesday, March 3rd for the first time in a few years. I had cleaned it and put it away, but pulled it out every now and again to admire it. I've owned it for 12 years and never had any problems with it before.

I loaded with six rounds of .38 special and it went click with no bang bang. I knew where this was going, but I put in six different rounds of a different brand and the same thing happened, six clicks and no bang bang. Not the slightest indentation in the primers, either. I was done shooting anyway, and I was so disappointed as this is my favorite gun so I left the range.

I just took the gun out this morning and learned that if it is the firing pin, it has to be replaced at the factory due to some kind of special press being needed? After visiting Colt's website, I was further disgusted to read that they don't service models older than 10 years except for 1911s and SAA new frontier guns. Great. Anyhow, I cocked the hammer and pressed the back of the firing pin and it does in fact protrude (I think) enough to strike the primer. It doesn't appear to be broken as I don't see any sharp metal or shiny spot, and it looks rounded and original. Hmmm. To me, it looks like the transfer bar isn't coming up high enough for the hammer to hit it. As far as I understand, the transfer bar should be between the hammer and the firing pin? I was able to press the firing pin and it looks like it's protruding at least the thickness of a penny I'd say, but this picture doesn't show the full extension because I had to press and operate the camera.
Any thoughts as to what could be going on, AND what to do about it? Thanks from Minnesota. 20200307_120657.jpg 20200307_115957.jpg
 

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The firing pin doesn't appear to be protruding far enough from the breech face.
I can't expand your picture so this is not certain.

When you push on the firing pin itself, NOT the transfer bar, the pin should protrude from 0.042" minimum, and 0.056" maximum from the breech face of the King Cobra model.

To check the transfer bar, hold the hammer back with your thumb and pull the trigger. Watch the transfer bar to see if it actually moves upward as the trigger is pulled.
The transfer bar should rise up to cover the head of the firing pin.

If the transfer bar does not move up to cover the firing pin, either the transfer bar is out of position on the trigger, or it's broken.
If so, either the gun must be disassembled to correctly reinstall the bar, or the bar will need to be replaced.
The bar is held to the trigger by a removable pin in the trigger.
The bar easily could slip out of position if the side plate screws loosened or were removed and the plate came loose.
The bar has a hole in the bottom that fits over the trigger pin, and it's possible the hole in the bar could break out and the bar and it's spring would need to be replaced.

If the firing pin is broken due to being dry fired without snap caps, replacement requires special tooling and staking tools.
Colt no longer services these older revolvers, but fortunately we have two Master pistolsmiths who are members and can service them.

Frank Glenn is a Master Colt qualified pistolsmith who's a American Handgunner magazine Top 100 pistolsmith, and is very well known here for his Colt work.
His quality of workmanship to Colt factory standards and techniques, pricing, and turnaround times get top reviews.

Frank Glenn-Glenn Custom Complete Gunsmithing Service Glendale AZ

Lee Specklin is a Master Colt pistolsmith who was trained at the Colt factory by legendary Colt gunsmith Don Tedford.
He has at least some supply of genuine Colt parts.

https://bpczubak.wixsite.com/spartanfc

Whatever the problem, either can correct it in short order.

Advice: DO NOT take your Colt to ANY local general gunsmith no matter what you've heard about his reputation. Few gunsmiths these days really understand the Colt revolvers and will almost certainly not have the parts or the highly specialized tooling needed to replace the firing pin if that's the problem.
With most any local non-Colt specialist you run a high risk of getting back a damaged revolver.

As I've said, if you owned a very expensive sports car you wouldn't take it to a local gas station for some kid to work on it.

If the transfer bar is out of position and you feel competent to disassemble the action, I strongly recommend buying the Kuhnhausen Shop Manual Volume Two on the Colt double action revolvers.
This was written as a training aid for new gunsmiths and shows all operations on the King Cobra, including full instructions on how to correctly disassemble and reassemble it.
If you feel comfortable doing disassembly the manual will step you through the correct procedure and not cause damage.
If you do want to do this, buy some REAL gunsmiths screwdriver bits to avoid damaging the screws.

https://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-...evolvers-shop-manual-volume-ii-prod25721.aspx
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks dfariswheel.
The firing pin does not appear to be broken under lighted magnification. The transfer bar does not go any farther "north" than shown in the picture.
Attached is a picture of the firing pin at or nearly at full extension, which sure looks to be 5 hundredths of an inch to me.
I have a competent friend who can help me to look and see if something has come loose or whatnot, but I don't plan on doing anything beyond that myself. 20200307_153234[1].jpg
 

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The firing pin protrusion looks good from your picture.

If the transfer bar is not rising up at all or not rising far enough, either it's moved out of place or it's broken at the bottom.

These later Colt's can be bears to reassemble because the hand and transfer bar are on small pins in the trigger, and the transfer bar has a flat spring that powers the hand.
They have a hellish delight in popping out of place as the side plate is reinstalled.

If the transfer bar is broken, you need a bar and spring assembly.

To remove the side plate, remove the cylinder assembly, then remove the side plate by tapping the frame just below the plate with a plastic screwdriver handle to vibrate the plate loose. DO NOT pry on it.

If the transfer bar is broken, you can get a blued steel part for the Mark III and Mark V and the spring from Jack First, but not a stainless steel King Cobra part.
I don't know of any parts house that has any King Cobra bars.

https://jack-first-gun-parts.myshop...mk-v-trooper-mk-v-safety-connector-987-580711
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The transfer bar had fallen off it's pin. It was over my head so I took it to a gunsmith for assembly since I had all the parts and nothing was broken. Everything is back together and the bar appears to be coming up enough to cover the firing pin now. BUT.... he f'd up my gun by damaging it! if you compare the photo above, you'll see he made hamburger out of it, and took a chunk of metal off the left side while putting some significant gouges in the right side. I contacted him by text on Sunday and his response was I have no idea how that happened, wasn't me, etc.
I'm pissed off. Still haven't fired it yet as I haven't been to the range. Here's a pic of the damage so you can compare. What would you do? This seriously devalues my gun when I go to sell it, even if it is a shooter?
20200317_170147[1].jpg
 

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What did he do...pry the side plate off? He calls himself a gunsmith?!
 
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Yes. And now he's going the route of outright denial. What the hell?! I'm just "lucky" I guess. I don't even know where to begin... I suppose I would have to know what the gun is/was worth, then figure out how much he f'd it up and what I could sell if for now, and sue him for the difference? I dunno. Damnitall.
 

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I'm sorry to hear of the damage, but I did warn you NOT to take it to any local general gunsmith.
This is WHY the warning.

Figuratively speaking, you just took your high end Mercedes to a kid at the local gas station.

At this point, about all I can suggest is talking to a top level gun refinisher service and see if they can save it by skillful polishing of the steel.

Here's the recommended people you can talk to who are well known experts in the art of metal polishing...........

Accurate Plating & Weaponry | Gunsmith In Newville, Alabama

https://fordsguns.com/
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You're right, you did warn me. I called the gentleman in Michigan. He doesn't work on anything after 196x because the action is different. I don't recall the exact date he quoted. I spoke briefly with the other fellow in Arizona and he said to send him an email with details. I would pay shipping both ways plus service and parts, of course. The shipping alone would have been at least $50. Once I found out I didn't have any missing or broken parts, it just needed to be put back together correctly, I thought I'd ask a local person that was highly recommended.
I am fed up with people who can't be honest. Why is it so hard for men to say three simple words: "I don't know"?
The only thing I can figure is, he'll have to pay me for the difference between what I could have sold the gun for in its former grade (excellent?) and its current grade (good or fair?). Or, I could send it off for repairs and roll the dice on suing to be reimbursed for the expenses. We'll end up in small claims court I'm sure.
 

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Running_Eagle, sorry to hear about your bad experience. If it were me and I was going to keep the gun (which I have done with all of my Colt revolvers), I would send it off to one of the true experts that Dfariswheel mentioned. Forget about getting compensation from your local gunsmith, who doesn't seem to be very trustworthy, and move on. Put your money into fixing the gun instead of fighting this guy in court. Years down the road, the money you spent on the fix will seem small compared to the enjoyment you'll get out of this revolved.
 

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Taking another look at the picture of the damage, I'm fairly sure an expert metal polisher can correct the damage and make it almost go away, at least to the point where it won't be very noticeable.

Again, choose a gun refinisher service who are REAL Master metal polishers.
I posted two who are well known in the industry. They have people who polish metal 40 hours a week and have been doing so for many years.
 
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