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cobra123,

Yes, an 1892 SAA will have the removeable Base Pin Bushing. I know that all Gen 1 revolvers will have the removeable Base Pin Bushing, but since I don't collect the Gen 2 or 3, I am not sure when the change was made, but I think it was the early Gen 3 revolvers. Colt did go back to the removeable Bushing at some point.
 

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As Abwehr stated, yes it will have a removable base pin bushing. But, sometimes they are a little tight or somewhat frozen in place due to not being removed in 50, 80 or 122 years, and might need a little gentle encouragement to extract. If yours is stuck, try inserting the base pin from the star/ratchet end of the cylinder and giving it a GENTLE tap with plastic faced hammer, that should get it started.

Best regards,
 

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How do you tell the difference between a 1st and 2nd generation SAA cylinder ?? or is there no difference.
The easiest way is to see if there is a RAMPANT COLT trademark stamped on the rear face between the cylinders. The 1st Gens did not have this stamping and the 3rd. Gens do not have it....just the 2nd generations. Hope this answers your question.
 

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Hondolane,

Welcome to the forum.


Click on the photo below. Notice the large flutes on 1st gen Colt cylinder known as "1/2" radius flutes" with rounds ends. 2nd and 3rd gens have skinny flutes with more pointed ends. Also not the front chamfered corners of the flutes. The chamfered corners steadily decrease in size until the end of the 1st gen production but will alsways have at least a small chamfer. 2nd and 3rds have no chamfer whatsoever. It's all these little details that give the 1st gens their panache!!

Jim

 

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The the presence or absence of the chamfers on the front of the cylinder between the flutes is one of the first things I notice when looking at a SAA. It's interesting how such a small detail can have such a major impact on the appearance of the gun. Three things I'd really like Colt to incorporate on its regular production SAAs are the chamfers on the cylinders, colour casehardened hammers, and a bevel on the edges of the base of the trigger guard where it mates to the bottom of the frame. It couldn't add that much to the costs if done as standard production details, and it would sure add to the appearance of the gun.

Best regards,

 

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Agreed! And wide flutes and wide loading gates of the 1st and early 2nd gens (until c.1966)!
Yeah, I don't see why Colt bothered to change the loading gate; there doesn't seem to be any advantage to the narrower gate either from an ergonomic basis or from a manufacturing basis. It seems like a strange detail to change after 90 years of production with the initial style.

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Thanks Guys,
I really appreciate the info. The reason I asked is that I want to shoot my 1st gen colt. Before I do I would like to replace the 1st gen cylinder with a 2nd gen
cylinder just to be on the safe side. I have had various opinions on ammo. Some say black power only. Some say cowboy loads are ok.
 

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The rule of thumb is no matter whether u change the cyl. to a 2nd gen. NEVER shoot smokeless loads thru a blk. pwdr. gun,the frame was made for blk. pwdr. & changing the cyl. doesn't alter that fact,I've posted this on this forum before,over the yrs. I've been tuning & re-building colts I've found several old 1st gen. colts w/the frame cracked in the area of the base pin which was the result of shooting smokeless in a gun that had a later cyl. in it.
 
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