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Discussion Starter #1
Hello? Anybody home? : )

Added two Colts to the stable today. First is a Police Positive from 1921. It has a 2.5" barrel and is in .32 Colt New Police. The interesting thing is that the barrel legend shows "Police Positive", then "B .32". What does the "B" signify? I know much later Colt made a Bankers Special in .38...could this be a similar, earlier sub-model "Bankers" piece? Curious. Unfortunately, this is not the original barrel. The barrel has a 1926 patent date on it while the frame was made in 1921. So, unless Colt was importing barrels from the future, the barrel has been replaced. I also think it has been reblued. The "rampant Colt" logo on the frame is quite light and the sides of the hammer are blued. Oh well...she was only $115.

The second is the more interesting piece. It is an Official Police from 1941. Caliber is 38-200 and the gun has some British-looking acceptance marks, but no British proofs. The left side of the frame is marked behind the cylinder, just under the topstrap with a "broad arrow", a "crown" then "WB" over some numbers. Ahead of the cylinder on the left frame is a "crossed pennants" mark without the numbers underneath as expected with British proofs. The only other non-standard mark that I see is a "rack" or "unit" number on the rear of the butt behind the lanyard swivel (the number is 571 BTW). The grips have been replaced with decent-looking "homemade" grips of a very orangish color (looks SE Asian to me). Any thoughts on these markings? I'll get photos soon.

Thanks for your thoughts (if you ever see this). : )

Rob

[This message has been edited by Teddydog (edited 06-28-2002).]
 

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Teddydog,

I'll reply. Nice scores!! I've never heard of 38-200, is there a another .38 round that could be used in that revolver (ie. .38 NP)? Or is that a moot point because you won't shoot it?
Interesting...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
38-200 is a British designation for a .38 S&W (not Special) load with a heavy (200 grain) bullet. They replaced their standard .455 Mk II revolver round with it in the late 20's or early 30's (I forget exactly when) and then adopted the Enfield No 2 Mk I break-top revolver for it in 1932. The Armaments Board (or whomever) decided that the .38 S&W round, loaded with a SOFT lead 200 grain slug would be just as effective stopping men while being much easier to shoot.

So...38-200 was the standard British revolver round through WWII.

Oh yeah...I'm gonna shoot it. I've got a nice 1934 Enfield No 2 Mk I in the same caliber and I've worked up some good loads that closely duplicate the military loading.

Rob
 
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