Colt Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I picked up my 2020 Python from the FFL (bought it on GB) in early Oct ‘20 and when I got home, gave it a good look over to see if it had any of the quality escapes that people have been reporting. Of course, I had to have one - a loose rear sight assembly. What I mean by this is that the entire sight assembly fits loosely in the frame channel and therefore won’t hold windage and can be moved by simple finger pressure. Ideally, there should either be zero gap between the sight assembly and the frame channel to prevent the motion OR there should be zero gap where the clevis on the bottom side of the sight base meets the frame in way of the roll pin. My revolver, s/n 15,9xx, had slop in both areas leading to the loose sight.

I called Colt CS and they sent me a shipping label and told me the turn time is about 5-6 weeks at current and provided they had an oversized rear sight they could fit up. Otherwise, they would replace the gun and the lead time would be subject to their production schedule. This was not my preferred option and I searched the web and YouTube for a DIY solution. I found one on YouTube by fl_799 titled “2020 Python and King Cobra Target Loose Rear Sight Fix”. He gets all the credit for the fix, however, in his video he does not take you through the visual process of performing the fix, so I took photos as I did the job and provided it for all of you to consider.

I fixed my loose sight in about 30 mins total time with the only material being a can of Monster to fabricate a shim and common gunsmithing tools such as an appropriate sized roll punch to remove the sight roll pin (I used a 1.4mm punch which is similar to 0.06” or 1/16”), hammer, roll pin holder (optional), screwdriver to remove the elevation screw and some tape to protect the finish against scratches from slipping tools.

Start by tightening down the elevation screw all the way down, then use the appropriate punch to drift the roll pin far enough to release the rear sight (you don’t need to push it completely out of the frame and that will help avoid scratches when trying to put the pin back in). Next, remove the elevation screw completely and remove the rear sight assembly while being careful not to lose the the small coil spring. Cut a piece of aluminum from a soda can to make a shim in a shape and size as pictured. Center the shim on the roll pin and then press the sight down on top of it to form the shim - just like stamping! The shim will eliminate the gaps between the sight base clevis and the frame. The folded over edges of the shim will cover the roll pin holes in the clevis, however, when the roll pin is driven through, it will cut a bore through the shim and lock it into place. Once this is done, lift the rear of the sight and tuck in the spring (if you didn’t put it there already), install the elevation screw and tighten it all the way down. Check the sight clevis holes and frame holes are aligned by passing the punch in from the open side and then drive the roll pin back in. I recommend that you tape off the frame in way of the roll pin so that you don’t get tool marks in the finish from a slipped punch. Use a roll pin holder if you have one to get as far down as you can then carefully drive it all the way home with the punch.

Check when you loosen the elevation screw that the sight travels upward under the spring force and is not bound by the shim. If it is free, then you’re good to go! This gives you an alternative to sending it in to Colt...hope this helps!
 

Attachments

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
15,485 Posts
Nice repair technique.

Also nice to see someone taking the time to protect the finish of the frame by using a cover.
It's these little things that separate a pro from a butcher.

A technique I used was to use a section of brass bar stock to drive pins in almost all the way, then carefully finish with a pin punch.
Still, covering the area is just good workmanship.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
15,485 Posts
I used a 0.039" pin punch from Brownell's for Colt rear sight pins..........


These work nicely and when damaged or bent you can just replace the actual pin, not pay for an entire punch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
I should probably apologize in advance, I don't mean to offend, but while I do appreciate your workmanship and attention to detail, and your using a protective shield to protect the finish is particularly praiseworthy, I just don't think I would feel that using part of an aluminum can as a shim would be a professional repair suitable for a $1500 gun. I don't mean to criticize, but a handgun that is as classy as a Colt Python deserves something better than a beer can shim.

As much as I would hate to send it back to Colt for repair, if it were my gun, I feel that an oversize sight would be a better repair. I don't mean to offend, but this wouldn't work for me. I guess I'm just too particular., but to each their own.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
15,485 Posts
I doubt that Colt has any over sized sights, so correction is on an "as-can" (pun intended) basis.
You could get fancy and buy some thin aluminum sheet, or just use readily available thin aluminum sheet AKA "beer can" aluminum.

Defects like this are due to miss-machining the cuts in the frame, or a defective sight made undersized.
It would be pure luck if it was the sight, in which case a replacement would correct the problem, but if it's a frame issue you're left with expedient repair methods.

Sometimes, even on higher end guns you just have to do what you can do to correct things like this if the gun is to be a using gun and not a collectible non-user.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,030 Posts
I should probably apologize in advance, I don't mean to offend, but while I do appreciate your workmanship and attention to detail, and your using a protective shield to protect the finish is particularly praiseworthy, I just don't think I would feel that using part of an aluminum can as a shim would be a professional repair suitable for a $1500 gun. I don't mean to criticize, but a handgun that is as classy as a Colt Python deserves something better than a beer can shim.

As much as I would hate to send it back to Colt for repair, if it were my gun, I feel that an oversize sight would be a better repair. I don't mean to offend, but this wouldn't work for me. I guess I'm just too particular., but to each their own.
Nope that will not happen. No "oversized" sights. If new sights will not work and the cut is too large, then new frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I picked up my 2020 Python from the FFL (bought it on GB) in early Oct ‘20 and when I got home, gave it a good look over to see if it had any of the quality escapes that people have been reporting. Of course, I had to have one - a loose rear sight assembly. What I mean by this is that the entire sight assembly fits loosely in the frame channel and therefore won’t hold windage and can be moved by simple finger pressure. Ideally, there should either be zero gap between the sight assembly and the frame channel to prevent the motion OR there should be zero gap where the clevis on the bottom side of the sight base meets the frame in way of the roll pin. My revolver, s/n 15,9xx, had slop in both areas leading to the loose sight.

I called Colt CS and they sent me a shipping label and told me the turn time is about 5-6 weeks at current and provided they had an oversized rear sight they could fit up. Otherwise, they would replace the gun and the lead time would be subject to their production schedule. This was not my preferred option and I searched the web and YouTube for a DIY solution. I found one on YouTube by fl_799 titled “2020 Python and King Cobra Target Loose Rear Sight Fix”. He gets all the credit for the fix, however, in his video he does not take you through the visual process of performing the fix, so I took photos as I did the job and provided it for all of you to consider.

I fixed my loose sight in about 30 mins total time with the only material being a can of Monster to fabricate a shim and common gunsmithing tools such as an appropriate sized roll punch to remove the sight roll pin (I used a 1.4mm punch which is similar to 0.06” or 1/16”), hammer, roll pin holder (optional), screwdriver to remove the elevation screw and some tape to protect the finish against scratches from slipping tools.

Start by tightening down the elevation screw all the way down, then use the appropriate punch to drift the roll pin far enough to release the rear sight (you don’t need to push it completely out of the frame and that will help avoid scratches when trying to put the pin back in). Next, remove the elevation screw completely and remove the rear sight assembly while being careful not to lose the the small coil spring. Cut a piece of aluminum from a soda can to make a shim in a shape and size as pictured. Center the shim on the roll pin and then press the sight down on top of it to form the shim - just like stamping! The shim will eliminate the gaps between the sight base clevis and the frame. The folded over edges of the shim will cover the roll pin holes in the clevis, however, when the roll pin is driven through, it will cut a bore through the shim and lock it into place. Once this is done, lift the rear of the sight and tuck in the spring (if you didn’t put it there already), install the elevation screw and tighten it all the way down. Check the sight clevis holes and frame holes are aligned by passing the punch in from the open side and then drive the roll pin back in. I recommend that you tape off the frame in way of the roll pin so that you don’t get tool marks in the finish from a slipped punch. Use a roll pin holder if you have one to get as far down as you can then carefully drive it all the way home with the punch.

Check when you loosen the elevation screw that the sight travels upward under the spring force and is not bound by the shim. If it is free, then you’re good to go! This gives you an alternative to sending it in to Colt...hope this helps!
I pick up a 2020 6in PY 211** and a 4in PY181** last week," Both" have the same problem with the loose rear sight assembly . the whole sight assembly fits loosely in that the frame channel. Back in the Day....I ran a CNC mill for GM. Colt could have wore out the tooling on that mill and put a taper slot in the frame where the sight sits. I think Colt has a problem. I don't think I need a beer can fix for 3,000 . I see Brownells is back order on the .039 punches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
Nice fix, beer can material (or energy drink material in your case) is a great material, it is very uniform in thickness (they make it by the millions of yards every year and it has a corrosion resistant finish (sodas are very nasty, lots of acid) as long as you wash the stock after you cut it you can’t buy better shim stock unless you need brass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,770 Posts
I wouldn't have a problem with a beer can fix but an energy drink can is just plain wrong. On second thought all my beer comes in bottles, nice fix though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
100 Posts
I pick up a 2020 6in PY 211** and a 4in PY181** last week," Both" have the same problem with the loose rear sight assembly . the whole sight assembly fits loosely in that the frame channel. Back in the Day....I ran a CNC mill for GM. Colt could have wore out the tooling on that mill and put a taper slot in the frame where the sight sits. I think Colt has a problem. I don't think I need a beer can fix for 3,000 . I see Brownells is back order on the .039 punches.
I think it's been established (via calls to Colt's CS) that the slop in the sight assembly is normal. I have a 4" KC with this sight from last year as well as a few early production Pythons (including one from the very first batch ordered bright and early Jan 1st). All have this looseness between sight assembly and channel. Given that no other area of the gun that has mated machined surfaces that are this loose, it seems this is an intentional design feature vs. worn equipment or sloppy tolerances. That said, it would be interesting to know what the rationale is...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,459 Posts
I'm just wondering why they felt the need to change the old sight. The machining on the sight and the frame was as simple as can be, while the new one looks like it was designed by Rube Goldberg. I don't think they solved any problems by changing the design, I'd rather say that they created several new problems.
 

·
*** ColtForum MVP ***
Joined
·
15,485 Posts
I don't know who owned the original maker of the Colt Accro and Ellison sights, but it's now owned by Kensight.

The price of the Accro is now so high, Colt would have to have significantly charged a LOT more for the guns, so they developed a new type that costs less.
A Kensight Accro is listed at $65. so even a significant discount to Colt would still be too high.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Slightly different topic but does anyone know the size of Allen wrench needed for the wind age adjustment?
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top