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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings,

I purchased a new 2020 Python recently, and the single-action (SA) and double-action (DA) trigger pull weights are a bit heavy for my tastes, when compared to other similar revolvers, including several newer (unmodified) King Cobras that I own.

The SA weight on both King Cobras is 4.0-4.5 lbs., while that of the Pytyhon is roughly 6 lbs., and unfortunately, I'm told that parts for the newer Python (including alternate hammer springs), are not available from Colt, Brownells or apparently, anywhere else!

So, I thought I'd drop this thread in hopes of getting some feedback from other owners of the new Python, on what their own trigger pull weights are typically registering, and also get some experienced opinions or suggestions on whether I might have any reasonable options in reducing the weights on mine without involving a return to Colt.

Thanks to all who choose to respond!

P.S. - My particular Python was manufactured as late as May/June of this year, and I am aware of the fact that early releases of this newer Python were met with complaints about 'light strikes', that Colt may have remedied with stiffer hammer springs. This alone may be the explanation, but I'm still curious as to whether I have any options.
 

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My 4.25" Python is in the #49xx range and is beautiful but the SA is just under 6 lbs., very disappointing at the least. Just got a 4.25" King Cobra and the SA is a smooth 3lb. 5 oz.. I actually like it better as it is built on the smaller frame.
 

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right now there are no factory replacement parts available and Colt will only replace defective parts if the gun is returned to them.
It's unlikely that Colt will be releasing any new model revolver parts to parts houses anytime soon, since they've released no parts for the first new model the Cobra.

No aftermarket parts are available as of now.

Your options are limited and carry the risk of ruining a part.
One option is to simply use the gun and allow the parts to wear in.
Actual shooting works best, or you can put some snap caps in and just dry fire it a lot.

Another is to open the side plate and put a little good grease on key areas like the hammer and trigger interfaces and wherever you see parts moving against each other.
Often this smooths operation and feels like a lighter action.

Last and most dangerous is to disassemble the gun and do light smoothing of parts operating surfaces.
Reportedly these new Pythons have few machining marks that benefit from this so results may not be worth the risk.
An absolute last and great risk would be to work on the trigger sear area and possibly the hammer single action notch.
In older Colt's there are stoning jigs made that go a long way to protect from ruining the parts.
In the days when new Colt replacement parts were available, any signs of stoning or alteration to a hammer notch meant immediate replacement of the part since that was considered to be a ruined part.

Now with no parts available, it's often necessary to try to save a hammer by careful stoning to keep a gun running but it's a last resort.
In the case of the new Python I don't know if the old Python hammer stoning jigs will fit and work correctly, and stoning by hand is not recommended.
An old master pistolsmith could do this because there were no stoning fixtures and they had the "touch" an experience. Even then they still ruined parts once in a while.

Lightening the factory main spring might be possible by careful bending, but again, that's risky and could cause a broken spring or miss-firing.
Note, that the early production new guns apparently had a light strike problem and lightening the spring might cause miss-firing.

Bottom line, until some after market main springs are made by someone or a stoning fixture is available I'd suggest the grease and dry firing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
My 4.25" Python is in the #49xx range and is beautiful but the SA is just under 6 lbs., very disappointing at the least. Just got a 4.25" King Cobra and the SA is a smooth 3lb. 5 oz.. I actually like it better as it is built on the smaller frame.
Thanks, Dave!

Interesting! So the pull on your King Cobra is virtually identical to both of mine, and so is your new Python. That's great to know! It's obviously far from a statistically significant polling, but its still reassuring in its own right. It tells me that the KCs are indeed registering at a somewhat less pull weight, and more importantly, that Colt probably 'intended' this Python to function in SA at about 6 lbs. (i.e., that at 6 lbs., mine is not an anomaly). So thanks for sharing your experience, and good luck with both of your new purchases!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
right now there are no factory replacement parts available and Colt will only replace defective parts if the gun is returned to them.
It's unlikely that Colt will be releasing any new model revolver parts to parts houses anytime soon, since they've released no parts for the first new model the Cobra.

No aftermarket parts are available as of now.

Your options are limited and carry the risk of ruining a part.
One option is to simply use the gun and allow the parts to wear in.
Actual shooting works best, or you can put some snap caps in and just dry fire it a lot.

Another is to open the side plate and put a little good grease on key areas like the hammer and trigger interfaces and wherever you see parts moving against each other.
Often this smooths operation and feels like a lighter action.

Last and most dangerous is to disassemble the gun and do light smoothing of parts operating surfaces.
Reportedly these new Pythons have few machining marks that benefit from this so results may not be worth the risk.
An absolute last and great risk would be to work on the trigger sear area and possibly the hammer single action notch.
In older Colt's there are stoning jigs made that go a long way to protect from ruining the parts.
In the days when new Colt replacement parts were available, any signs of stoning or alteration to a hammer notch meant immediate replacement of the part since that was considered to be a ruined part.

Now with no parts available, it's often necessary to try to save a hammer by careful stoning to keep a gun running but it's a last resort.
In the case of the new Python I don't know if the old Python hammer stoning jigs will fit and work correctly, and stoning by hand is not recommended.
An old master pistolsmith could do this because there were no stoning fixtures and they had the "touch" an experience. Even then they still ruined parts once in a while.

Lightening the factory main spring might be possible by careful bending, but again, that's risky and could cause a broken spring or miss-firing.
Note, that the early production new guns apparently had a light strike problem and lightening the spring might cause miss-firing.

Bottom line, until some after market main springs are made by someone or a stoning fixture is available I'd suggest the grease and dry firing.
DFaris,

Thanks for very detailed, informative and wise advice. I greatly appreciate it.

This confirms my fears with respect to parts, and your right, a guy would have to be very-very careful when getting into and modifying these things, for fear of potentially messing things up. I do not intend to do this. I've gingerly disaasembled mine and mildly polished some of the internal components (i.e., the cylinder release latch, cylinder hand, etc.), but I won't be messing with anything else including the hammer, hammer spring or trigger sear. I'm not experienced enough to do any of that. And given the information that Dave (above) has shared with me here regarding the SA trigger pull weight on his new Python, I don't think it would be wise for me to monkey with the tension of the wishbone-shaped hammer spring, for light strikes could easily be the result.

However, I have some .38/.357 snap-caps here, so I am definitely going to take your advice to use the diligent application of grease on a number of key components, and work the daylights out of it, from latch to trigger to hammer and more, because other than the sticky latch and the somewhat heavier trigger pull, the gun functions beautifully, and I do NOT want to jeopardize that!

Thanks again for your many contributions in recent days to both threads! (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm going to take a moment to close this thread out with a few final thoughts on Colt and their practice of restricting parts availability for their newer revolvers including King Cobras (KCs), and particularly, the 2020 Python.

I have recently finalized some minor repairs to the cylinder release latch on my own new (2020) Python, and I intend to do the same with my two KCs very soon, but personally speaking, I find it nothing short of 'outrageous' that Colt purposefully hoards its parts, on brand new (current production) guns, restricting or basically prohibiting their availability to their patrons/gun owners, either directly from Colt or from any other retail source in the country. That's simply ridiculous!!

I can readily acquire parts for my Ruger GP-100 and SP-101 . . . I can readily acquire parts for my Smith & Wesson 686 . . . I can readily acquire parts for my Walther/Interarms ppk/s, but I have to risk shipping my two-month old Python back to Colt, if I needed a tiny, fragile little cylinder latch Z-spring, that I could purchase from Numrich or Savage Arms for $3.00???? Seriously??%@#&!?? On a $1,500 revolver??

To be clear, I cherish my two King Cobras and my new Python, but telephone the folks at Colt and ask them why they need to have such a policy? They have no answer. In my view, that's "pathetic", and I think every reasonable gun enthusiast in America knows it!

Anyway, I'm done venting about Colt and their business model, so from my perspective, we can now consider this thread closed. Thanks to all!
 

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I don't believe Colt is "hoarding" parts. They have projected sales and order parts to meet those goals with little extra...no real point in having parts sitting around representing money spent but not used in production. They probably keep just enough extra for warranty needs. Besides...Colt has been in enough of a precarious financial position they can't afford to hoard extra parts. When there is excess capacity they can fill parts ordered by their two authorized parts resellers...Brownells and MidwayUSA.

Ideally a manufacturers wants raw product coming in the loading dock just before it's needed while finished product is being shipped from the adjacent loading dock.
 
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The only Colt part I've seen for the K. C. or Python has been the King Cobra front sight at Brownell's. Know this 'cause I just got one to put a brass 'bead' in for my 4.25" K.C..
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Yeah, well, as a consumer, I'm not much interested in their margins, or their bottom line. I'm interested in maintaining a $1,500 firearm, that might require the simplest and cheapest of parts, without spending needless amounts of lost-use time and money, sending it 2,000 miles away, to have some minimum wage tech spend 2-minutes installing it.

And if we're gonna talk dollars and Colt's "inventory" concerns, are they (or anyone else in their right mind), going to try and argue that pre-paid back-and-forth shipping of the item via UPS/FedEx, etc., plus their own tech's bench time, is less costly than making a single flathead screw or a $3.00 z-spring available to their patrons?? That's just laughable.

And to be fair here, I'm not talking about replacement barrels or frames, hammers, triggers, etc. I'm just talking about minor, commonly replaced items, like flathead screws, or latch springs, or hammer springs. In my view, those kinds of low-dollar, frequently lost, misplaced or damaged items should NOT have been a heavy-lift for Colt.
 

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I don't believe Colt is "hoarding" parts. They have projected sales and order parts to meet those goals with little extra...no real point in having parts sitting around representing money spent but not used in production. They probably keep just enough extra for warranty needs. Besides...Colt has been in enough of a precarious financial position they can't afford to hoard extra parts. When there is excess capacity they can fill parts ordered by their two authorized parts resellers...Brownells and MidwayUSA.

Ideally a manufacturers wants raw product coming in the loading dock just before it's needed while finished product is being shipped from the adjacent loading dock.
JIT .... “Just In Time“ manufacturing.... only works if your supplier has no hiccups... most manufacturers have sophisticated models that provide guidance on how much they need to stock based on their suppliers “on time“ performance. Six Sigma was the focus when I retired in 2013, don’t know what’s the new program of the year...
 

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Colt stopped stocking or selling many spare parts back in the late 80's.
In the early 2000's they started selling parts only through Brownell's and Midway, and they seldom have many genuine Colt parts.

The lack of spares is just how it is these days with many manufactures.
"Just in time delivery" from suppliers, lack of raw materials for the suppliers and manufacturers, and the current plague limit what is possible.

For various reason over and above that Colt just isn't doing a big parts stream so it's hard to get spares, including high cost in keeping a large spare parts supply.
Spare parts cost money for a company to maintain. It's inventory that costs money to keep up with a small return on investment.

Couple this with parts houses unable to keep large stocks of parts for the same reasons and you get a drought.
In spare parts there's a lot of factors most people don't even suspect that makes it expensive to provide with little return.
Comparatively big companies like Ruger or S&W can afford it, smaller companies like Colt just can't.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, its clear that I'm kind of the exception on this matter and that most folks don't take issue with it, and I suppose, the meer fact that one can always remedy their problem by sending their firearm back to Colt, is a satisfactory alternative for most, but I still struggle somewhat with owners all having to do that.

And here's another example of why . . .

Back in 1998, I bought a 'minty' stainless Delta Gold Cup (10mm) for $1,200 at an estate sale. I rarely carry or fire it, but when I do, especially when feeding it hotter loads, it can literally and suddenly go into 'full auto' mode, in a manner that is really quite dangerous. The recoil of those hotter loads is stout enough to effectively produce a bump-stock type of reaction, essentially emptying a full magazine in just a second or two! Unexpected, alarming and not good!

Presumably, this is due to a recoil spring that has become too weak, and maybe, since its a standard 1911 design, Wolff or somebody similar, will offer a suitable replacement for it (I'm crossing my fingers!), but here again, I am most reluctant to consider sending it off to Colt for something so minimal and simple, especially when my State Farm agent tells me that it may have nearly tripled in value since its production in '91 and its purchase in '98.
 

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Well, its clear that I'm kind of the exception on this matter and that most folks don't take issue with it, and I suppose, the meer fact that one can always remedy their problem by sending their firearm back to Colt, is a satisfactory alternative for most, but I still struggle somewhat with owners all having to do that.

And here's another example of why . . .

Back in 1998, I bought a 'minty' stainless Delta Gold Cup (10mm) for $1,200 at an estate sale. I rarely carry or fire it, but when I do, especially when feeding it hotter loads, it can literally and suddenly go into 'full auto' mode, in a manner that is really quite dangerous. The recoil of those hotter loads is stout enough to effectively produce a bump-stock type of reaction, essentially emptying a full magazine in just a second or two! Unexpected, alarming and not good!

Presumably, this is due to a recoil spring that has become too weak, and maybe, since its a standard 1911 design, Wolff or somebody similar, will offer a suitable replacement for it (I'm crossing my fingers!), but here again, I am most reluctant to consider sending it off to Colt for something so minimal and simple, especially when my State Farm agent tells me that it may have nearly tripled in value since its production in '91 and its purchase in '98.
Has anyone "tinkered" with the trigger? Since it was used that may be the problem and the only way to know is to have it looked at. Seen the blacksmith trigger job do this more than once. I have a Delta's CCS build and have had a couple of more over the years and I fire "full power" ammunition not "hot" but to the full SAAMI pressure spec. Go over that with a Colt Production Delta it is not a good thing. Brass will bulge because of the non fully supported barrel not to mention damage the pistol if the correct recoil AND mainspring are not used -- will beat itself to death. :) . I shoot 10mm 90% of the time and have a "few" of them.
Never had this issue.
 

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Has anyone "tinkered" with the trigger? Since it was used that may be the problem and the only way to know is to have it looked at. Seen the blacksmith trigger job do this more than once. I have a Delta's CCS build and have had a couple of more over the years and I fire "full power" ammunition not "hot" but to the full SAAMI pressure spec. Go over that with a Colt Production Delta it is not a good thing. Brass will bulge because of the non fully supported barrel not to mention damage the pistol if the correct recoil AND mainspring are not used -- will beat itself to death. :) . I shoot 10mm 90% of the time and have a "few" of them.
Never had this issue.
Thanks Dave.

Since it was manufactured and first sold in '91, and then sold again to me in '98, there's really no telling whether or not someone previously could have tinkered with it, but fortunately, it functions just fine with standard 10mm loads, which is all I ever really need with it anyway. Nevertheless, at least in theory, it shouldn't be subject to having that 'full-auto' thing ever happen regardless of load specs, so I really would like to get it resolved at some point, and that'll take some replacement springs, an array of ammo types and a day or two at the range. 😉
 

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Thanks Dave.

Since it was manufactured and first sold in '91, and then sold again to me in '98, there's really no telling whether or not someone previously could have tinkered with it, but fortunately, it functions just fine with standard 10mm loads, which is all I ever really need with it anyway. Nevertheless, at least in theory, it shouldn't be subject to having that 'full-auto' thing ever happen regardless of load specs, so I really would like to get it resolved at some point, and that'll take some replacement springs, an array of ammo types and a day or two at the range. 😉
Ok now just so you are aware because maybe you are not. The vast majority of commercially loaded 10mm ammunition sold is Not loaded to the full SAAMI spec or to the original pressure of the Norma loadings. What type of ammunition are you having the issues with?

Below is a pretty good article on the history and why there is a variation in 10mm "factory" loaded ammunition.

 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ok now just so you are aware because maybe you are not. The vast majority of commercially loaded 10mm ammunition sold is Not loaded to the full SAAMI spec or to the original pressure of the Norma loadings. What type of ammunition are you having the issues with?

Below is a pretty good article on the history and why there is a variation in 10mm "factory" loaded ammunition.

Very cool! Thanks for sharing that, and no, when it comes to 10mm and 10mm ammo, I am definitely not all that educated.

I shot the daylights out of it back in the early 2000's, but I also recall the ammo (most 10mm ammo), being rather difficult to find at that time. For quite a while, I can remember having to buy directly from DoubleTap, but I don't recall the exact specs of the ammo. Its been a long time since, and I also recall having some other issues with DoubleTap loads (stove-piping, etc.), but I'll have to dig into my records to see what specific "hot" load(s) were causing the full-auto issue. However, specs aside, I'm pretty sure it was happening with Underwood brand ammo of some sort.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
O.K., so, I went and looked back at what load(s) I was likely to be shooting when this 10mm Gold Cup of mine was going into full-auto mode, and I can't be truly certain of this, because I was firing alot of different ammo with it at the time, but I think it was the 100-grain Xtreme Defender rounds by Underwood Ammo. As I recall, those packed a wallop!
 

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Very cool! Thanks for sharing that, and no, when it comes to 10mm and 10mm ammo, I am definitely not all that educated.

I shot the daylights out of it back in the early 2000's, but I also recall the ammo (most 10mm ammo), being rather difficult to find at that time. For quite a while, I can remember having to buy directly from DoubleTap, but I don't recall the exact specs of the ammo. Its been a long time since, and I also recall having some other issues with DoubleTap loads (stove-piping, etc.), but I'll have to dig into my records to see what specific "hot" load(s) were causing the full-auto issue. However, specs aside, I'm pretty sure it was happening with Underwood brand ammo of some sort.
Well you said Underwood......... One of my favorites in loaded ammo! THAT being said about 15 years ago hen they were just getting started good I bought a FMJ load and cannot for the life of me remember the weight think it was 180gr. That lot DID have some issues and caused from being loaded up a little over pressure :) because they were being fired in fully supported Tussey build and a Wilson, the primers were Flat and even some pierced primes. The cases were showing some case expansion near the base over the other ammo when I measured with the Starrett's. Now that being said things do happen and it was taken care of by Underwood. Yes these rounds did absolutely go off with more authority lol than the anything else I had and could tell by the ejection (went to the next county) of the fired case that something was going on.

I use Underwood for my carry ammo now when I am on the ranch. Use the 18ogr with the XTP bullet. Have had very good results on live animals with that bullet in everything from 10mm's to my favorite the 454! The accuracy in all of my 10's like the 180 XTP Underwood OR the 175 gr Silvertip! My Tussey and Gemini Customs shoot the Silvertip so well it just puts a big grin on my face. Silvertip is harder to find but Winchester does run it once a year I keep several cases on hand. Yes not much of it around Right Now and it is over a 1.00 a round because it is in short supply.

Last thing-------this is the greatest tool for searching for ammo or components! Sign up on the underwood site for email specials--some are very good!

 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the added reference, and yeah, Underwood has become my primary source also. Has been for a couple of years now. Wide selection in almost all calibers and great customer service. I wish they had some offerings in .32 ACP and .327 Federal Mag for my wife's use, but for .38 Special +P, .357 Mag and 10mm, they are essentially my sole source.
 
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