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Discussion Starter #1
I have been looking at this revolver at a local gun shop. Have been confused as to its origin. 6inch barrel is marked "Colt Official Police 22 Long Rifle" Serial #25756 looks like a small T over the serial and a faint K under the serial. Recessed cylinders, wood grip with silver medallian. Micro adjustable rear sight in a dovetail groove. Front sight is fairly high with 3 faint pin marks at the bottem of the sight. I guess what is getting me is that everything looks like it was factory. The gun is almost 98%. Price $650 somewhat negotiable probably. Obviously I am attracted to it, while being somewhat spooky as to its origin. Can anyone help pin this one down. Thanks, Robba
 

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My book doesn't give great detail on this serial #. 1940 starts with 14000 and the next year it gives is 1947, starting with 30001. My book shows the pre war model being made from 1927-1946. It states that the pre war is worth about $100 more than the post war. The one described was probably made in 1946, but I'm not sure. If it is a pre war model it probably is worth about $550. Others on this forum may have better info.
 

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Very interesting robba.

The Official Police was a fixed sight gun. What you saw had " Micro adjustable rear sight in a dovetail groove." That doesn't sound factory to me.

Tell us about the frame. Was it indeed a fixed sight gun that had a dovetail milled and a rear sight installed? Or could it have actually been an Officers Model Target from 1942 that was re-barreled using an OP barrel?

Was the frame flat on top, indicating an OMT? What are the patent dates on the barrel?

The "T" in the frame could very well mean this was indeed a fixed sighted OP that was "targeted" at the factory. If so then the adjustable rear sight was added later.

Lonewolf knows a lot about the Pre-War OP's so lets wait for him to tell us the score.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The top of the frame had the normal groove for fixed sights, except a very professionally milled dovetail slot with a adjustable sight with micro on it. The front sight has been elevated and seems to be fastened with three pins at the bottem of the sight that are milled off flat, again looks like it was done at the factory, or by an outfit that knew what they were doing. What about the K under the serial number. I have looked at this gun several times, and each time come away wondering who could have done the work on it as perfectly as it has been done. The blueing seems to match front to back. I don't see any corners polished off. The grips look fine, is wood with silver medallion right for this era. Thanks again for your replys. Robba
 

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This is getting old,fast! No, not the Forum,but "winter"! Lost electricity for 4 hrs. last night,and headed to break to 1970-71 snowfall seasonal record here in S. Maine-and I am on "Spring(?) Break from teaching!

Thanks for the kind words WS23 about "pre wars,but I think this is a "wartime piece",based on its serial #,and a little rereading of Pate's Book.That 16,000 "gap" between 1940-47 is correct Robba. Many .22 O.P.s went to various Govt. agencies for training purposes,and the 26,000 range was shipped in 1942. Look for "strange markings" under the grips,and over the cylinder latch especially. The "T" means it was targeted by turning the barrel at the factory,while test firing(BTW,adjustable sight models,such as a Shooting Master .38 Sp. and 4 1/2" Officers, I have,also have the "T".

The price is Too HIGH,IMO. I doubt if this work is factory,and no matter how good,it has lowered the collector value of a "stock" .22 O.P. I recall,I think,one chatted about here,a month or two ago,prewar,w/box etc. going for $750.

I love the way dealers will add more to the "selling price",for "custom features,and quickly deduct these "modifications" from the price they offer to buy it from you for!!!(IMO,an exception,would be a premium piece,that has been "customized",by a firm such as King,Pachmayer,or even Christy).

Hope this helps,robba,"stress" the "ruination" of the collector value in your negotiations with the seller,and best of luck;that gun oughta be a great shooter,and you can adjust the windage by drifting,and I'd like to know if the front sight has any height adjusting screw(s)? Bud

This is definately an >
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey lonewolf: Does the K under the serial # stand for King? There are no adjustments on the front sight. The front sight looks like it was perhaps pinned with 3 pins to the original sight. The pins are milled flush, and blued with the rest of the finish. I am not one to read a lot into something that is not there. This particular revolver had one heck of a lot of very fine finish work done on it by a firm that knew what they were doing. They have had it for some time, and I can possibly buy it for $500 to $550. I will look at it again a couple of times, and may just buy it for spite. I have seen a lot of revolvers, and own with my son many different brands. This one just got my curiosity up. Thanks again to all who replied trying to pin it down. Robba
 

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Ditto on WS23's comment being an inspector mark. King was pretty "open" with their name on any of their "conversions"-and rightfully so!

Its obviously up to you on the price,but it is great to see that you appreciate the great craftsmanship of "days gone bye",both by the Colt factory and the gunsmith who did the work. Bud
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Again thanks for the kind replys from you all. I am not going to beat on the Official Police horse for now. I will keep looking at it. Commenting on old revolvers. My son and I mostly buy older Colts, Smiths, and even Rugers. My favorite Colt is a 45 Colt Anaconda that was factory highly polished. It is a joy to both shoot, and look at. Other shooters ask about it at the range all the time. We also have a OMMT that is all but new in 22 cal. that is also very favored. Back in the so called "olden days" workers for the most part took great pride in their chosen line of work, and the guns of the 40's thru 80's are my favorites. Unfortunately the supply seems to be drying up quickly. Grab what you can, while you can. Again its been fun chatting with you folks. Robba
 

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Just to chime in, the "K" is definitely an assembler's mark; I have had three Colt's of different vintages with that stamped on the frame or crane, and all were box stock. And I agree with Lonewolf that it's circa 1942. About the only way to learn more would be by getting a factory letter, which would at least tell you the gun's shipping date and the configuration it was in when it left the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I will probably wind up buying this after I look at it again. Its been at the gunshop for quite some time, and I'm sure many have perused it with much the same questions that I have. I am partial to old 22s', and 45s'. Don't want to swear on this forum,but just bought a Ruger 45 SS Redhawk with the integrated scope rings both because they are not being made anymore, and because I don't like the marks a clamp on scope mount makes on the factory highly polished SS 45 Anaconda I have. One of the prettiest, and most favored of all our shooters. Robba
 
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