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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
.32 Police Positive, my first Colt, "entry level" condition to say the least.

Hello
Just picked up my first Colt. From circa 1910, here is my "shooter grade-" Police Positive in .32 New Police. From what I can tell, the mechanics seems to be decent. I have not cleaned this revolver yet. Anyway, there are many nicer examples on here, but since this is my first, just wanted to show it.
Mark

Port Side.


Starboard Side

 

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Welcome to the forum, and thanks for posting. I recently shot a Police Positive in .32 New Police, and it was really fun to shoot. I was surprisingly accurate with it also. Ammo isnt too expensive either.
 

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It reminds me of one of my first Colts - but mine was in .32-20 - I still have it and shoot it from time to time. I now have quite a few more !!! You have been bitten by the Colt bug and it will only get worse !!! LOL ENJOY!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Maybe I have been bitten by the Colt bug?...oh well. God knows my wallet might not enjoy it, but...LOL. The good news is that the Wife actually likes this little revolver and that can only be a good thing. I have heard good things about the .32 Colt New Police/.32 S&W Long, things like it is accurate and fun to shoot, and also not too spendy to reload. To be honest, I had this vision of my first Colt being a Police Positive in .38 Colt New Police, as I have a couple revolvers in that calibre already, but looking forward to seeing what the .32 NP is like.

I'd also like to find a revolver in .32-20 as well, be it a Official Police, or a S&W M&P (can I say that here?, I do like S&W as well LOL). Oh well...this might be the motivation for me to get my degree and get a decent career going LOL.

I'm looking forward to seeing how this revolver cleans up, I plan on getting around to that later this week. I ordered a vintage set of aftermarket stocks* and a vintage Pachmayr Grip Adapter (both I'm guessing are 1950s-1980s era?), to replace the chipped stocks. One of these days I hope to find a decent set of correct stocks, but then again, this gun is a bit beat up and a brand new set of repro. stocks might look out of place? Oh well, just glad to have a Colt now.
Mark

*Rest assured, I will retain the original stocks.
 

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Maybe I have been bitten by the Colt bug?...oh well. God knows my wallet might not enjoy it, but...LOL. The good news is that the Wife actually likes this little revolver and that can only be a good thing. I have heard good things about the .32 Colt New Police/.32 S&W Long, things like it is accurate and fun to shoot, and also not too spendy to reload. To be honest, I had this vision of my first Colt being a Police Positive in .38 Colt New Police, as I have a couple revolvers in that calibre already, but looking forward to seeing what the .32 NP is like.

...
Welcome Mark .

Your .32 has character . It's been there ;)

The nice thing about the old Colt 32/38 revolvers is that they built so many that very good shooters are available a decent prices if you are patient .
 
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See if those grip panels have the ser.# scratched on them. Mine (1919) did, so I said'OK', and kept it that way. Those old rubber grips get kinda brittle and break easy. I have 2 revolvers with broken original grips. They look crappy, but they are authentic. I like the idea of the old time beater that still works like it did way back when.....
 

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Mark
I'd like to welcome you to the forum!!!:cool:

That's a great first Colt. The .32 is a fun, accurate ctg to shoot & should be useful as a small game ctg.
I've known people to use it in Bullseye matches with target guns & the accuracy was phenominal.
Enjoy & thanks for sharing. I'd like to see a range report when you get a chance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

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Hello
Just picked up my first Colt. From circa 1910, here is my "shooter grade-" Police Positive in .32 New Police. From what I can tell, the mechanics seems to be decent. I have not cleaned this revolver yet. Anyway, there are many nicer examples on here, but since this is my first, just wanted to show it.
Mark

Port Side.


Starboard Side

Ok so it didn't leave the factory quite like that but IMHO there is a real appeal to a Colt that wears a century of service like this one does.
 

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I have a 6" barreled Police Positive in about the same condition except mine has some well worn wood stocks. It is one of my favorites for pests, varmints, and general fun shooting. Plan to start reloading for it next week. I enjoy shooting the .32 Colt NP.
 

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Welcome to the Forum, TomcatPC! I like your new little Colt, too. Like you, I'm new to Colt revolvers. Got my first one just last year; a chopped down Police Positive Special. Very used and very modified, but it shoots wonderfully! Sometimes it's even my CCW weapon. Hides nicely in most of my clothes pockets. Ain't it great when wifey loves hubby's expensive hobbies?
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yes, I'm grateful that my Wife does not mind (too much for the most part) me buying an older firearm here or there. Granted the vast majority of what I buy tend to be less than stellar, which is fine with me. My other hobby (WWII Living History) is not cheap either for the most part, but I've gotten the hang of maintaining interesting hobbies whilst on a budget LOL.
Mark
 

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Nice gun for anyone that has small hands and doesn't like recoil. Since the wife is OK with shooting it, get some big shoot-n-c targets and set them close. They will cost $1 each but when she shoots and sees the holes appear where she is shooting, it can be addicting. The police positive that you bought appears to be built on the small 32 frame and later guns were built on the bigger 38 frame. 32 S&W long is very cheap to reload and the low velocity cartridge is right at home with cast bullets. One can shoot this cartridge for about .06 each if they cast the bullets. Dies for this cartridge will usually also work for 32 auto with just a different shell holder. And if you get a bullet mold around 80 grains, it will work for both 32 auto and 32 S&W long.

I have repaired original Colt hard rubber stocks with JB weld. It has a gray color so I use marker to make the repair black. But you did the best thing by shooting it with replacement stocks because if you drop the original stocks with the gun, they can break in 2.
 

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They will do nothing but get more valuable, I love how even the wear is on your revolver makes me think it spent a lot of time in coat pocket. It was well cared for during it's use despite the wear, no cancer.Something that is just special about the pre war small frame Colts that I find simply charming,elegant lines, superb craftsmanship and extremely functional for pleasure or save your life or someone else's.What other things in your life have those qualities ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'd love to know the history of this gun... Whilst cleaning it, I noticed marks on the recoil shield made from the heads of cartridges. So my gut wants to tell me that it was kept loaded for a while. Maybe this was a Policeman's revolver?, holster wear on the finish, but it has not been "shot to death"? No way to ever know for certain. Even though it has turned "brown" there is little actual rust. The bore looks decent (by my non-gunsmith trained eyes) for the most part. Although when I look at the bore with a LED bore light, it looks fine, but when I look at the forcing cone area with a regular light, the metal has the "brown" metal look that the outer barrel has. I'm not too concerned about this, I think it will shoot alright. The only mechanical item that concerns me is, it has slightly late cylinder bolt lock in "carry up"?, when I cock the hammer slowly. From what I've read here, if I got it right, this is not a life or death thing. When I hold the hammer back, pull the trigger then ease the hammer down, it fully locks up. If I have to have the hand replaced sometime down the road...oh well, life goes on LOL.

Yes, I'm planning on reloading the .32 Colt New Police Cartridge. Right now, finding the dies, brass, bullets is in progress.
Thanks
Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks Guy S., I saw that article a while back and it got me interested in the Police Positive and the .32 NP/.32 S&W Cartridge. It was going to be a Police Positive or a S&W .32 Hand Ejector what ever came first LOL. Wanted a Police Positive regardless, but was more looking for a .38 New Police to be honest. Now, I'm grateful I went ahead and bought this revolver. Did I overpay?...probably, should I have waited?, probably...am I glad that I went ahead and grabbed this one...yes.

The one problem I have now is...finding a cheap/free, legal, and safe location to shoot at. I used to live in Homer, Alaska for a few years after I got out of the Service and there was a gravel pit just outside town that was the local shooting pit, and it was totally legal and free. Now living in Toledo, Ohio...finding a place to shoot that does not involve spending a lot are nil..."first World problems" LOL. Now there are places here in innercity Toledo where I could shoot at...but I'm not a criminal and I intend to obey the law LOL (The last sentense was meant as a joke).
Mark
 
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