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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I am new to the forum and also Colts I am a Ruger Fan (forgive me) anyway I recently received a .357 New Service S/n 346916 in about 98% without box and also a 1911 U.S. Army S/N 930836 looks like never fired about 99% any help with values would be appreciated Thanks Russ
 

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Your New Service came from 1939.
On your 1911 Government Model, any prefix, suffix or letters in the middle of the S/N?
 

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[ QUOTE ]
there is nothing between the #s of the S/N Russ

[/ QUOTE ]

And if there are no prefix or suffix letters the number does not compute.
Are you taking the number off the side of the frame?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well maybe there is a prefix as I looked at the S/N I saw this (No) the o has an underscore line I thought that this just stood for # hope this helps Russ
 

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Russ,
If I read it correctly, s/n 930836 falls into the WWII production block of numbers for 1943. Does it say Remington Rand anywhere on the gun? Wilson shows s/n's 916405-1041404 assigned to Remington Rand in 1943.
 

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You're just too quick. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Proofhouse shows it as 1942-1943 Remington Rand also.
Russ has it under semi-autos also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I see no Remington Rand but this is what I do see----right side frame, united states property M1911A1 U.S. Army No930836 looks like (80) on triger guard. left side frame patented apr 20,1897 sept 9,1902 dec 19,1905 feb 14,1911 aug 19,1913 colts PT.F.A.MFG. CO. hARTFORD ,CT.U.S.A. the letter (p) is under the mag release button Russ
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
that may make some sense except for the condition of the gun. Is there any way to figure this out? Thanks Russ
 

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[ QUOTE ]
that may make some sense except for the condition of the gun. Is there any way to figure this out? Thanks Russ

[/ QUOTE ]
The only way to be absolutely certain is to obtain a Colt letter, but the odds are slim that a military firearm has not had parts intermixed.
 

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some slides are # under the firing pin stop, may be just the last 2-3 numbers, they should match the frame #`s. i dont know the exact % but very few military guns remain matching, maybe 1 out of 100.even if mismatched it`s still a nice collectable.
 

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Hi Russ,
I have a 1911A1 Remington Rand frame with Union Switch & Signal slide on it. It is just about 100% including the shipping carton and papers dated 1962 from the Red River Arsenal ... Back when the Gov't trusted it's citizens, you could buy them in like new condition direct from the arsenals... I've had a couple others with the boxes this same way. All were rebuilt and had mixed parts and were in as new condition. The US&S gun came from the estate of the original buyer... Hope that answers your question. Bob Best
 

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I do not understand how the condition (like new) of the subject gun affects whether it is an arsenal rebuild. On the contrary, what appears to be a new-condition finish will more likely be found on a rebuilt gun than on an original gun, since the rebuilts were often never issued again, before being sold through the NRA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
OK I got alot of info on the 1911 but no values I am interested in possibly selling the New Service 357 any idea of values would be appreciated. Looks to be 95-98% has small chip on butt of grip Thanks Russ
 

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Russ you will have to give some more info on the New Service,in order to get a better idea of its value. From the serial number,your gun was made in 1939. Barrel Length? Type of finish(blue or nickle?) Lanyard Ring? and any police dept. markings,or non factory agency markings?

The .38 Special New Service came out circa 1931-32,and had a narrower,slightly rounded grip frame)butt one could order the larger one. Bbl. lengths were 4",5" and 6"(regular N.S. in production from 1898,were 4.5,5.5 and 7.5 inches. When S&W introduced the .357 Magnum,in 1935,Colt soon chambered the N.S.(and its Shooting Master target revolver on the N.S. sized frame) and the Single Action for the .357.

Most of the .357 Magnum New Services went to police departments,many being so marked,and have a helluva lot of wear,unless refinished. I passed on a beat up piece of crap,that had gouges and dents and other issues a few months ago,due to its high price (dealer still has it).

We don't know how many .357 N.S. were made,but seeing as they were only made for 5 years,or so,it is a scarce variation. The chipped grip will be an issue with a serious collector,as the wooden stocks,that this gun should wear(and see if the grips are serialed numbered to your gun by removing them) are nearly impossible to find,although I sold a nice set with the rounded butt to a guy in a neighboring state,for only $100 because he is mostly a shooter like I am,and not a "nit picking collector of safe queens."

New Services have escalated in price,and you hardly see them for sale in gun shops,other than the U.S. 1917s and/or "customized/butchered conversion ones" nowdays. Glad I was able to start collecting them over 20 years ago when they were still viewed as "the poor man's big framed Colt,versus the Single Action.".

A mint,98% N.S..357, WITH the box,would fetch in excess of 2k.

Bud
 
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