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Not being fully "up" on post 1968 Colts,I didn't realized that the Trooper Mk.III was offered chambered ONLY for the .38 Special(I have an "early" Trooper,that is.)

Got some original 1969 advertising flyers on the Mk.IIIs and it mentioned this. Then I checked some "Shooters Bibles" and the chambering offering seemed to vanish around 1979-and was NOT offered on the MK.V.

Probably for "Politically Correct" P.D.s that hated the word Magnum(Liberals are soooo into semantics and "words"!) and/or those that feared lawsuits due to "overpenetration".

Anyone ever see a MK III Trooper so marked and chambered??

Noticed when I fired my MK.III "wierd O.P."(see post on that) that it shot to the left,and that front sight was aligned a hair right,using a protractor device. This would have mean't turning it in,and was not enough to send back to factory(no "good" gunsmiths left around here WITH proper tools),so I just CAEFULLY widened the rear sight notch to the right-and gun is now right on target with 1000 fps 158 cast loads.

This is ergonomically,one of the best "feeling" guns I own,those late model "semi round butt" Trooper stocks feel great,and the 36 oz. weight soaks up recoil.

Couple of interesting things in these 1969 "flyers"; 1) Colt calls the new action "perma fit"and this goes along with what dfariswheel has been saying about the ease of working on these guns versus the older style actions that required "fitting" and got out of time with abuse. They stress the hardened metal of the parts,so keep the stones and files away from the post 68' actions. 2) flyers state that the guns were tested by 20,000 rounds of live ammo a dry fire test of 250,000 snaps! Well this doesn't jive with what was pounded into me about dry firing, ANY gun alot,years ago. Plus I think I have read about Mk.IIIs being prone to firing pin breakage due to extensive dry firing?

Bud /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif
 
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