Colt Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just inherited a Colt .38 Super and tried to do my own research but haven't gotten very far.
Serial number is 37,5xx, has fixed sites, barrel has the word Match after .38 super. Grips seem to be aftermarket which are an off white color checkered and have a trademark for Franzite on the inside.

Most of the sites I looked at, show it could be from 41-45. How do you determine the exact year?
Also, if the grips are aftermarket, what type of grips would have come on it originally?

Sorry, if I am asking basic knowledge questions, the only other older gun I have is my Great Grandfathers war gun. This is all new to me.
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,473 Posts
Franzite was a well known maker of aftermarket stocks. If gun is in decent shape and is an original Super Match it would have significant collector appeal. I think the correct stocks would be full checkered brown plastic with the reinforcing "washers" around the screw holes. Pictures would sure help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
010.jpg 011.jpg
Franzite was a well known maker of aftermarket stocks. If gun is in decent shape and is an original Super Match it would have significant collector appeal. I think the correct stocks would be full checkered brown plastic with the reinforcing "washers" around the screw holes. Pictures would sure help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, I added some pictures. How do you determine if its an orginal super match. The slide only states "Colt Super.38 Automatic". The barrel states "Colt super 38 auto match"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,672 Posts
You can get the exact shipping date and destination by ordering a letter from Colt (for $100). It appears to have pre-war features with after-market grips. It is not a Super Match but someone added a match barrel.

Regards,
Kevin Williams
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,599 Posts
Super match pistols have hand honed parts inside the gun. Parts of the mainspring and housing, trigger, sear etc. are hand polished to a distinctive slightly grained honed finsh. The most visible part to be like this is the firing pin retaining plate. So pull back the the hammer and look at the plate the hammer lands on. If yours was an unmarked Super Match that plate would be white, not blue. Very unlikely that yours is a Super Match, but the interior parts and a Colt letter will tell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
The post war Government Models used lots of leftover military parts. That would explain the stamped trigger, slide stop, and thumb safety. The wide spur hammer and lanyard loop mainspring housing don't make sense on this vintage commercial pistol. The military stopped using the wide spur hammers in mid '44. The Super match was made until '42 but the slide was so marked.

The match barrel, well this pistol probably suffered from the accuracy problems that plagued these pistols and the owner put a match barrel in it in an attempt to help that out.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top