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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure that many members here will know the answer to this question. With respect to double-action revolvers what models did Colt manufacture chambered for 45acp? Of these models which would be the best shooter for the money? I've always wanted a S&W 625 in 45acp. But now I would prefer to find a shooter not a collector Colt revolver chambered for this cartridge.

Thanks for your time,
Dave
 

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only d/a was the new service, saa was also chambered in .45auto, unfortunatly colt had NO large bore gun from ww2 till the anaconda was introed some time in the 80`s{dont quote me on the date}
 

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Colt made about 150,000 New Service revolvers in .45ACP under Ordnance contract during WWI; S&W made a similar quantity. This was the U.S. M1917. I've no idea whether Colt made any in this chambering after the war.
The Colt has a long length of pull and requires a large hand with long fingers to shoot DA successfully. It also has a very heavy trigger pull.
That said, I shoot mine frequently. This martial revolver was shipped October 1918.



JT
 

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I shoot mine too but find it is almost impossible to shoot DA. I have to shoot it SA most of the time. Heaviest DA trigger pull I've felt on a revolver and it stacks up to the release point.
 

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Not to change topics, but I have a New Service in .44-40. I also have good-sized hands. While I haven't had the chance to try many New Service actions, I had always heard they were very heavy.

Have to say, mine is exceptionally smooth. Almost amazing, really. Single action trigger is outstanding. The gun was made in 1929 and I remember reading a long time ago that production during this period was somewhat slow (Great Depression era) and a little more time was available to spend on each gun.

Like any general statement, it is going to have exceptions. But, my NS lends credence to the theory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for your replies. OK so just the 1917 New Service was chambered for 45acp. Still it's a good looking gun without the shrouded barrel, etc that came along later. I'm just guessing here these WW1 guns command a premium price?

Dave
 

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colt made some commercial n/s in .45 auto following the first war, the commercial guns command a premium over the military guns in my experience. the commercial guns were better polished and finnished and had the checkered stocks of the era.just about any new service is pricy these days, shooter grade guns start at around 350$. i saw a n/s that had been converted to target with adj. sites, large target type hammer and professionally reblued not long ago on an auction site for around 500$, it would have no collector value but would make a nice modern shooter.
 

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"Honest" unfooled with Military 1917's,showing normal wear and patina,like Jacob's gun and a very similiar one that I have,are getting harder to find. I also have one of the Commercial 1917's that icdux mentioned,made in 1932-33 as parts clean up pieces.

SOME New Services were made in commercially in .45 acp,but the barrel is stil marked ".45 Colt"(which technically its is!). This continued right up to the end(or offical end!!) of assembly in 1941,(Probably the last 2 New Services built-and SOLD by Colt were, several in 1954,and sent to ammo companies: They were in .45 auto chambering.

As much as love my New Services, I would NOT want to shoot against a M-625 S&W with a fixed sighted N.S.!!! My carry piece is an early M-610 S&W 5". Very user friendly,low recoil and quick to align on target.

If you find a "non collector" N.S. in .45 Auto,having an FDL Wondersight put on with 1 screw and a higher front sight put on,will make a better shooter. Grip adapter and trigger shoe helps too! That describes an old N.S. I keep near the front door,as a "greeter"!

GoodLuck.

Bud
 

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icdux1 mentioned a great option if you want a reasonably priced New Service shooter. I've stumbled across a couple of NS in 45 Colt that were professionally modified by installing a S&W rear sight and a ramped front sight that were both keepers. There are a number of hack jobs floating around to be avoided, but when done correctly, it works well and looks great. The sight modification and reblue destroys any collector value but at the same time enhances the shooter capability and keeps the price within reason. The collectors turn their nose up at them, and few people are looking for NS shooters, so they usually sell pretty cheap. I've had one for approx ten years, and the other approx 2 years, and have less than 500.00 in the pair. The latter coming off the Auctionarms site with a stripped and jammed elevation screw and nut that was replaced in five minutes. Both look like new and shoot great. They're not exactly plentiful, but they are out there if you keep a watchful eye and ask around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well I'll keep an eye out for one in the shooter grade. I've never really been a collector. I pretty much can't help myself. If I buy a handgun I'm darn well gonna shoot it. From the way you guys describe the N.S. I guess that's why quiet making large frame revolvers until the Anaconda?

Dave
 

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dwr461-The N.S. was far from a bad gun,its sales and dependability,compared to the pre war large framed S&Ws prove that(I love the pre war "Big Smiths" and shoot them as often as any of my types of revolvers).

Colt "claims" that the N.S. machinery(jigs etc.)was moved outside during the World War Two production boom,to make "room" for machine gun production.

Sales of the SAA and N.S, had been slow in the 30's(but hell,there was a depression).

Basically,Colt felt there was NO NEED for a big bore REVOLVER-as they had the 1911 .45 Auto. What few sales,they expected to loose to S&W,they were prepared to. The .45 Colt,38/40 and 44/40 chamberings hadn't been too popular.

Well,they blew it! First,their prediction of the .357 Magnum being "a novelty"(they had chambered the N.S, and SAA for it,1936-1940,and they weren't big sellers),was OFF-as there was a hugh backload of orders for the S&W N frame)pre M-27) .357 in the late 40's-early 50's.

Caught without a .357.Colt revamped(heat treated etc.) the Officers Model for it,calling it the "357".introducing it in 1954. Then the Python came along!

I was hoping,and even saving some $$$$,when I heard that Colt was FINALLY going to build a Large Framed D.A. revolver in the late 80's,that it would be a New Service "clone",with the "leaf spring",old style,Python action,target sights,and of course modern metallurgy,and more user friendly grip profile and stocks.

Yes,it would have been HIGH COST-but we got the Anaconda instead. Not to deride this gun,but it is not what I had hoped for-and I have never forgiven Colt for becoming driven by the corporate mentality vs. being great gunmakers.

Bud. /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ok now I just want to have further knowmledge on the subject. I'm honestly curious. I hope this isn't a stupid question. The N.S. has a scaled up Police Positive action with a leaf spring? But the Anaconda has something different? If anyone has the time to educate a guy who loves Colt but is ignorant on the subject I would appreciate it.

P.S. I can't afford to $200 for the Colt Double-Actions book.

Thanks,
Dave
 

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But you can access some manuals here http://www.stevespages.com/page7b.htm. The Anaconda is in the "Double Action Revolvers" book, which saved money by covering several of the later models. Or you can look at the Colt schematics at e-gunparts.com. Neither source is a real treatise, but does give some basic insight. HTH /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
 

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colt quit making the old style action on most guns in 1969 when they introed the mk series. the mk series guns are more compareable to s&w than the old colts. the d-frame guns d/s, agent, cobra, d/back still had the old style action also but were finally disc.the python had it till it was disc.the old style action can be detected by a blind man in a coal mine,with the hammer down and trigger held to the rear there is zero movement at the cly. NO OTHER revolver action can pass this simple test.if it wiggles even a little it`s not the real deal. /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif
 
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