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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I picked up a shooter Python. The selling gentleman was a PA State Trooper in the '70, and this was his service revolver for many years. He bought it new in 1971, and though it has holster wear (85-90% bluing) he took very good care of it. He put Safariland grips on it (that were trashed), but kept the LNIB original grips. They're so perfect I took them off too, and put some Colt Rosewoods on. However..., like most cops back in the day he put whiteout on the rear sight, and red nail polish and whiteout on the front ramp. I cleaned it up a little, but I am not a fan of this modification, and want to remove it back to grade. Does anyone have any experience in gently removing these modifications? Should I just go at it with a brass brush? I would think nail polish remover would be a very bad idea. It there something that would be gentle on the bluing but still cut the nail polish. Really, I'm not sure how to proceed. Any advice would be welcome. I would hope this would be the only situation where anyone would put any kind of paint on a Colt.
 

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I believe your nail polish remover would work, as will acetone or lacquer thinner. Some other will likely confirm this but it is typical and easy thing to have to do.
 

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Nail polish remover will work fine. just DONT get it on the stocks! Its a solvent and will harm the finish on them.
 

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Acetone + QTIP = No more nail polish. You don't need to bathe the sight areas, just moisten the Q and gently apply until you see the stuff coming off. Remember, slow and easy and careful and Q's are cheap ;) . No scrubbing, no fuss..... Afterwards apply your oil/protectant as obviously the area will be without.
 

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I've had luck with a metal dental pick with a sharp point. There have been times where I very gently got the pick under the nail polish and the entire thing popped off and left a 100% clean site in 1/2 a second.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks. I did gently probe around with a steel pick, and it wasn't budging. If I had a brass one I might have tried a little harder. I'll go Q-tip and play curator with it. Thanks for the tip!
 

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Acetone is good stuff, just don't get any on you.
Go at it sparingly, and you should have that thing right in short order.
Bamboo skewers can be cut, trimmed, & whittled to fit just about any job.
 
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