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Titanic survivors vindicated at last - Telegraph

"Cosmo took with him into the unknown the Edwardian aristocrat’s survival kit: a flask of brandy, a colt automatic pistol and a handful of cigars, which he later handed out to the seamen in his rescue boat. "

Was considering the sinking of the Titanic and it's 100th anniversary. A hundred years ago as this is typed the ship was far down in the water but still afloat. That is if I have the time zone correctly calculated. It would have been 1:47 AM (no Daylight Saving Time) in 1912. The ship didn't have long nor did a large number of passengers and crew. I think the first lifeboats were lowered before 1:00.

Funny to think about the 100th anniversary. I was reading (yet again) Walter Lord's "A Night To Remember" on this date in 1972 and about this time of night. That night I remember thinking about how long ago 60 years seemed. As a kid in high school I got on a kick for a few years about reading about the Titanic. "The Maiden Voyage" was published a couple years later and offered more detail including more about the inquiry after the event. I've only revisited both "A Night To Remember" and "The Maiden Voyage" a single time each since adulthood and that was years ago. I've not read any major narratives of the event but did keep up with the efforts to find the sunken ship.

The Titanic and the times in which it was conceived and constructed was the end of a peculiar and awkward age. It was almost as if the march of mankind took a great but stumbling leap. Technology had really ratcheted upward in the previous 30 years. Social mores were in a flux and, in hindsight, pointed to an upheaval of cataclysmic proportions. The hubris of man took a hit in 1912 with the event of the sinking. Within two more years the civilized world was turned upside down with the advent of the First World War and it's gross horrors.

We can sure make a mess of things when we get "too big for our britches."

http://gunsgeargraymatter.proboards.com/index.cgi?action=viewprofile&user=bmcgilvray



 

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Okay, I actually once calculated, years ago, when I was in Great Britain, the EXACT times of when the Titanic struck the iceberg, and when it foundered. The Titanic struck the iceberg at 11:40 pm local time (the time on board the Titanic). It foundered at 2:20 am. When a liner crossed the Atlantic in those days, it would regularly (I think on a daily basis) adjust the time so as to be at the time of the port of call at the time of arrival, usually Southampton, or New York, depending on the direction of travel. The Titanic was 2 hrs 58 minutes BEHIND Greenwich Mean Time, which means it struck the iceberg at 2:38 am GMT, and foundered 2 hrs 40 minutes later, at 5:18 am GMT. However, Britain is currently on British Summer Time--this did not begin until 1916, so one must subtract 1 hr from the times noted above to obtain the exact time of impact and the time of sinking. The times whould then, therefore, be 0138 hrs and 0418 hrs. The Eastern time zone of the United States is 5 hrs behind GMT, so, therefore, the Titanic would have struck the iceberg exactly 100 yrs prior to 8:38 pm last evening (2038 hrs), and sunk exactly 100 yrs prior to 11:18 pm (2318 hrs) last evening.
 

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Bryan,

Times flies whether you're having fun or not. I remember a lot of activities commemorating the ship, its crew, and its passengers on the 50th anniversary, when I was 17. There were a lot of interviews with survivors, some of whom were that age or slightly older at the time of the disaster. Man, do I feel old!

Buck
 

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Well, haggis;

People your age can't be old yet.

Good job calculating the time mrcvs. I've never heard of the daily reset of the liners' clocks.
 

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What would be a worst shame is if future crews did not learn from this. Most likely they have or we would have learned of more iceburg disasters. Something that all aircraft crewmwmbers are trained since the early 1990's is what is known as Crew Resource Management (CRM), in which all crewmembers have a say in most decision making and are incourage to speak up. So while the Captain has the ultimate say, he is required to accept input from all at all times.
 

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It is strange the pull the whole tale has on us to this day. A buddy, the most unsentimental of men, went to see the most recent Titanic movie in a theater.
He said that, while watching the passengers file aboard on the screen, he had an almost uncontrollable urge to stand up and scream at the actors "NO! Don't go aboard!"
Moon
 

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I can imagine a Colt M1903 or two was aboard, but I'm sure we all made a collective groan when we watched the movie and first saw the sinister bodyguard's plated, engraved 1911!
 

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During a marine project we sailed over the wreck location on our turns. You could detect the wreck on the acquired data but it was not impressive. Just more of a few bumps in an otherwise barren area.

I will say on the cold nights on watch out there you could really relate to the whole story. That part of the north atlantic can be very calm at time but at other times it is a raging beast with great waves and wind. We worked out of St john's Newfoundland. One of the really neat harbors I have been in. I am looking forward to going back as it was and is a great town to visit.
 

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So sad the technology and method constructing Hulls as seen with the enormous Transocianic Side Wheeler 'Great Eastern' which sixty years before had grazed some outcropping off of Newfoundland I think, tore a gash over a hundred feet long in the side, and, never missed a beat...never even listed.

It had a 'Double Hull'.

Why the builders of the 'Titanic' did not either emulate that method, or, merely finish the compartmentalized Bulk-Heads all they way "up" which was the 'method' they had elected, I do not know...'Value Engineering' at it's usual, I guess.

The worst things about 'simple' lessons, is that they have usually already been learned several times over, previously, by however many prior Pilgrims' mis-adventures, if one wishes to learn from them the 'easy' way...one does one's Homework.
 

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I watched "Titanic Mystery Solved" on The History Channel last weekend. They did a sonar search called "mowing the lawn" of a 15 square mile section of ocean floor around the wreck and uncovered more substantial pieces of wreckage that made up the mid section of the ship. I would recommend anyone who is interested in Titanic watch it. For what it's worth I liked it.
 

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"mowing the lawn" is what I do for work. They were probably towing side scan sonar or multi-beam. Basically you tow the "fish" about the ocean bottom on overlapping stripes and each pass you map the ocean surface. Your goal is 200% coverage so you see from both sides. We normally tow a multi-streamer boat (I was doing 10 streamers, 8km as I remember that job but there have been so many) so with dual guns, you cover about 500 m per pass. Basically you shoot a line, move over 500 m and shoot the next line just like you were mowing the lawn. This ignores streamer feather, currents, whales and weather.

The whales up there are really impressive. I used to stand up on the bridge with the MMO (mammal observers) and have them tell me the species and the like.

Anyway, on my data, the titanic was identifiable, but just a blob on the seabed. We were turning so you get line turn noise and we were only popping a small mitigation gun so the source was poor. Neat to see it though.
 
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