Colt Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
The Consummate Collector
Joined
·
7,440 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
One of the great past Presidents at Colt was William C. Skinner (January 26, 1855 — March 8, 1922). In 1906 he was selected to serve as vice president of Colt's Manufacturing Company. He was elected President three years later and served in this capacity until 1911. After a 5-year hiatus he resumed this position in 1916 and served as president of Colt a second time until 1921 when he resigned to become chairman of the company's board of directors.


In anticipation of the military draw down following World War I Skinner implemented a diversification program at Colt's Manufacturing similar to that done at the close of the American Civil War. Skinner acquired contracts for business machines, calculators, dishwashers, motorcycles, and automobiles; all marketed under a name other than Colt. Other measures included cutting the work week, reducing salaries, and keeping more employees on the payroll than they needed, all of which kept the company in business after Skinner's retirement.


The New Police revolver pictured below was signed out by Col. Skinner in the summer of 1901 to be given to Robert H. Schultz who was the vice President of the Smyth Manufacturing Company in Hartford, Conn. that was a book binding machinery company. They were also the owner of Sigourney Tool Co. Hartford, CT, that manufactured wood working and medal working machinery. One can only guess that there may have been some business dealings between Colt and Mr. Schultz's companies.


Shown: Colt New Police revolver S/N 13490 and a photo of Col. Skinner.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
One of the great past Presidents at Colt was William C. Skinner (January 26, 1855 — March 8, 1922). In 1906 he was selected to serve as vice president of Colt's Manufacturing Company. He was elected President three years later and served in this capacity until 1911. After a 5-year hiatus he resumed this position in 1916 and served as president of Colt a second time until 1921 when he resigned to become chairman of the company's board of directors.


In anticipation of the military draw down following World War I Skinner implemented a diversification program at Colt's Manufacturing similar to that done at the close of the American Civil War. Skinner acquired contracts for business machines, calculators, dishwashers, motorcycles, and automobiles; all marketed under a name other than Colt. Other measures included cutting the work week, reducing salaries, and keeping more employees on the payroll than they needed, all of which kept the company in business after Skinner's retirement.


The New Police revolver pictured below was signed out by Col. Skinner in the summer of 1901 to be given to Robert H. Schultz who was the vice President of the Smyth Manufacturing Company in Hartford, Conn. that was a book binding machinery company. They were also the owner of Sigourney Tool Co. Hartford, CT, that manufactured wood working and medal working machinery. One can only guess that there may have been some business dealings between Colt and Mr. Schultz's companies.


Shown: Colt New Police revolver S/N 13490 and a photo of Col. Skinner.

Just amazing. Thanks for posting.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
Some history of CT manufacturing that is not prominent news information. Thanks for sharing.

Craig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
966 Posts
What a wonderful piece! Thank you for sharing.

I am sure there are those much more learned than me in Colt history but I have read that Col. Colt was quite generous and progressive in his treatment of Colt employees, to include housing and medical care at the plant complex for many employees. Sounds as though Col. Skinner followed in those footsteps with his approach as described above. Interesting to reflect how times have changed.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top