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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
For those looking for a holster to fit the new Cobra, here’s one. This is a Safariland elk suede lined holster for a DS in basketweave finish. This is the first one of mine that fits the new Cobra. Others I have have been too tight. This one fits perfectly and is a classic style. I’ve had it for years and is in as new condition.

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I hope this doesn't come across wrong, but a carry holster that doesn't completely cover the trigger is an accident waiting to happen. Otherwise it looks like a well crafted holster.
 

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I hope this doesn't come across wrong, but a carry holster that doesn't completely cover the trigger is an accident waiting to happen. Otherwise it looks like a well crafted holster.
Good point. Holster is an old school style when people who carried were mostly cops and hopefully were more savvy than the average cc today.
 

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Good point. Holster is an old school style when people who carried were mostly cops and hopefully were more savvy than the average cc today.
There's absolutely nothing wrong with that holster or its design. I carried many revolvers in the same type holster, as did thousands of others, on a daily basis for not years, but decades without incident. I still prefer a Tom Threepersons style holster for revolver carry though I no longer carry revolvers for self defense. Keeping in mind that it is a double-action revolver with a relatively heavy trigger pull (+/- 12 lbs), keeping your finger off the trigger is all that is required. Now if we were talking about a striker-fired pistol, then I would be in complete agreement with Zenas as that would most certainly be "an accident waiting to happen." Enjoy your revolver and its "new" holster. It's a handsome one!
 

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"It hasn't happened to me" is anecdotal and doesn't get to the reality of the issue. A carry gun with an exposed trigger IS more likely to get snagged on something and accidentally fire than one with a fully covered trigger. Both scenarios are remote, but don't let remoteness of likelihood fool you into thinking it isn't more dangerous to have an exposed trigger. Just because it hasn't happened to you doesn't mean it hasn't happened. It has. And also don't think that a 12 pound trigger means it's immune from being accidentally caught on something and firing in a holster. Your body weight is WAY more than 12 pounds, so if your trigger snags on something as you sit down it WILL go off, heavy double action or not.

I don't want to make this thread all about the safety of holsters, but I also feel compelled to point out situations that can potentially be unsafe. And it cannot rationally be argued that an exposed trigger is as safe from accident as a completely covered trigger. That defies logic.
 

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And it cannot rationally be argued that an exposed trigger is as safe from accident as a completely covered trigger. That defies logic.
That's probably why no one made that assertion or even suggested such an idea besides you.
 
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My Galco covers most of the trigger. I originally bought it for my Ruger SP101.
 
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No love for my Galco, just not molded for this revolver. When I get around to it, I'll get a custom one made. It doesn't seem like the market is in any rush to mold a holster that is correct for this pistol. Probably because it is a one off design, and who knows how long they will be manufactured.
 

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That's probably why no one made that assertion or even suggested such an idea besides you.
Except you did make that assertion. In response to my claim that that holster was less safe because of the exposed trigger, you specifically said, and I quote, "There is nothing wrong with that holster or its design." So if I assert something IS wrong with that holster in that it isn't as safe, and you respond that there is nothing wrong with it, you are specifically challenging my assertion that it isn't as safe, thereby making the claim that it is as safe.
 

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Without trying to add fuel to the argument...maybe it could be said a holster with covers the trigger guard is more safe than the exposed trigger guard design is less safe. I know it's a distinction without a difference but both designs are safe as long as the person carrying it does his job. I have both designs but do prefer the covered trigger guard design more...but it also depends on when I originally purchased the holster...the covered design came along much later for the most part. Holster makers aren't in the business of making unsafe designs...they make holsters designed for specific purposes. I like holsters that have safety straps overing the exposed hammer but many holster makers list holsters without safety straps as the market wants them.
 
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Except you did make that assertion. In response to my claim that that holster was less safe because of the exposed trigger, you specifically said, and I quote, "There is nothing wrong with that holster or its design." So if I assert something IS wrong with that holster in that it isn't as safe, and you respond that there is nothing wrong with it, you are specifically challenging my assertion that it isn't as safe, thereby making the claim that it is as safe.
Saying there is nothing wrong with a design and understanding there are varying degrees of risk in designs are two concepts that can both be true and accordant. Designs that may be "more safe" don't necessarily make other designs unsafe or too risky. In the case at hand, decades of history involving thousands upon thousands of capable, trained men of a bygone era prove otherwise. This is by no means anecdotal, but is a genuine body of evidence. These men, with few exceptions, carried their service and/or off-duty revolvers in holsters with the same exposed trigger guard design as the OP's holster without mishap. That's a fact, not a "might" or "maybe." During this time, the vast majority of service revolver holsters had the same design and were marketed by every major holster manufacturer including Bianchi, Bucheimer, Safariland, and Tex Shoemaker, just to name a few. For the first half of my career, my own experience involved the use of the poorly named Jay-Pee spring lock safety holster which required one to put their finger into the trigger guard and press the spring lock in to draw their revolver. This action put our finger on the trigger as we drew our revolvers. The troopers of the NJSP from 1921 until 1983, including myself, used these holsters, again, without mishap. The reason all ~2700 of us (at the time) could manage this feat is because we understood the unique risks involved and used the proper amount of caution in using them. I know the mere thought of these holsters make some weak in the knees, but I'll reiterate that there is nothing wrong with them if the necessary amount of caution is applied in their use. Frankly, it's my firm belief that the Level III and IV "security" holsters of today are more dangerous to the police officers using them than the open trigger guard designs of the past and, if given the choice, I'd take my chances with the latter every time.
 

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You keep saying "without mishap" as if there was never a mishap. That's false. There were some mishaps. Maybe few enough for it not to matter to you. But for me, firearm safety is paramount, and mishaps, regardless of how few, that are preventable are unacceptable. I get what you're saying, but there is a better mousetrap out there now. I see no valid reason to increase the risk of a carry holster by even a fraction of a percent. It's unnecessary. But you are entitled to your opinion.
 

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Just my opinion...a covered trigger guard is better than an uncovered trigger guard..
This horsehide holster will soon be up for grabs as I am having a shoulder rig made for the Cobra.
Perfect fit and superb carry. Hardly know I’m wearing it.
 

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You keep saying "without mishap" as if there was never a mishap. That's false. There were some mishaps. Maybe few enough for it not to matter to you. But for me, firearm safety is paramount, and mishaps, regardless of how few, that are preventable are unacceptable. I get what you're saying, but there is a better mousetrap out there now. I see no valid reason to increase the risk of a carry holster by even a fraction of a percent. It's unnecessary. But you are entitled to your opinion.
As are you, my friend.
I'm not here to change anyone's opinion on what handgun, holster, or anything else they want to use. As a still active law enforcement firearms instructor, I don't automatically try to change a shooter's stance, grip, or other fundamentals simply because they aren't textbook perfect. Unless their shooting results prove changes are necessary, I let them use whatever style is working for them. In this instance, I believe everyone should use a holster they have confidence in, are comfortable with, and can use safely.
We, all of us, should make an effort not to assign our own limitations, misgivings, or prejudices onto others because individual experience and skill levels vary widely. For example, a holster one person can use day after day in complete safety may be wildly dangerous on another's hip. It's good to have choices.
 
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Just my opinion...a covered trigger guard is better than an uncovered trigger guard..
This horsehide holster will soon be up for grabs.........
Especially when you have one for sale! :D
 

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Figured someone might need/want it sooner. I have been waiting on a holster for my S&W 640 for going on three months now. Waiting is seldom fun....
 

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For example, a holster one person can use day after day in complete safety may be wildly dangerous on another's hip. It's good to have choices.
Yes, choices are a good thing. Carried my S&W M10 .38 in this Bianchi for about 10 years as my off-duty rig on the LAPD. I guess I didn't know any better that I had such a hazardous holster. Proper drawing with the finger off the trigger kept me out of trouble with a DA-only revolver. Only holster I would say was "dangerous" was the clamshell, which was responsible for more than a few NDs on our department.
Bob

 
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