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Well one of the best things for me anyway of buying a used gun is the opportunity to thoroughly clean it. In some instances I believe it may have been the first disassemble and clean performed in years if not decades:bang_wall:. The problem is that I get a strange sense of joy in seeing all the grime, powder residue and grit build up in the tub of Hoppe's and the little flecks that I find that scrub away with an old toothbrush or a toothpick;). After owning, cleaning, shooting and cleaning again I find that the level of gunk build up is gone and the sense of accomplishment is not there after a cleaning. I already have more than enough guns and I hate to let one go even though I have on occasion done so. Maybe I should quit my job and start a gun cleaning business. I would starve for sure as I spend hours cleaning and would never earn enough to feed the kids let alone pay for their college education.

flanman
 

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You have a problem? How about me? I never took one of my guns apart just to clean it. When I get an oldie for my collection it may get a little oil dribbled in, depending on how the action feels. I do clean all bores. Some I've had for ages probably have whatever lube they left Colt or S&W with. Example is my S&W New Model 3, I bought in France in 1950, carried it around Africa for year & a half & still would shoot it now and then if I had .44 Russian ammo. It's dim back down memory lane, but I probably gave it a wipe down, swabbed the bores & may have put a drop of oil in its action, like I'd do today.

My problem, if it is one, I'll pass on to my heirs to deal with as they see fit.

 

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I clean my guns after each range session and oil them down. I clean the bore, chambers, and frame window. Very seldom have I ever gone beyond removal of the cylinder for cleaning. When I feel there is a build up of grease or gunk, I remove the grips and dunk the gun in lacquer thinner.

I served for awhile as company armorer while in the Army. Most of our rifles that were defective/unservicable came not from use, but from over zealous cleaning, most of the time having been disassembled far beyond field stripping.

And, yes, these were cartridge rifles for smokeless powder!


Bob Wright
 

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If you're mechanically inclined and like guns, there's just something deeply satisfying about cleaning a filthy gun of years of grime and fouling.
Where many people just see a dirty, time consuming chore, some people see an enjoyable job that speaks to something in our personalities that gives the safisfaction of a job well done, and having restored a fine machine to proper condition.
 

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I think I have an internal conflict between working on guns, restoration, modifying, etc., and the attitude I was born into & grew up with of treating a gun like a tool or an implement.
 

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Many of my friends know I am the 'gun guy' and I am always getting guns brought to me to clean up, or to see if I can fix a minor problem. I thoroughly enjoy taking them apart, cleaning them up and sometimes even fixing the problem. I get so involved, that I lose track of time and before I know it, several hours have gone by! One of the perks of the hobby!
 
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