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I am always curious about the build/ship data on the Officers Model Match revolvers chambered in .22WMR. My example (787XX) shipped December 29, 1959, yet the .22WMR chambering was not cataloged until 1961! What is the serial number range of the subject revolver? Does the right stock panel have a "thumb rest?"

(You need to letter it and report back!)

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am always curious about the build/ship data on the Officers Model Match revolvers chambered in .22WMR. My example (787XX) shipped December 29, 1959, yet the .22WMR chambering was not cataloged until 1961! What is the serial number range of the subject revolver? Does the right stock panel have a "thumb rest?" (You need to letter it and report back!)
Judge, this is in the 77,000 range, so most likely 1959 also. I will have to dig it out and check the right stock panel. No letter yet; I will put it in the queue. And I, for one, appreciate your delivery: the unvarnished truth, a rare commodity.
 

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If your revolver is in the 77,000 range, and mine is in the (high) 77,000 range, one would be tempted to say that yours is 1959 production as well. However, a 1959-1960 production probably should have full-checkered stocks, which mine does, and yours does not. I suspect that the 850 (the often-quoted, but unsubstantiated, production figure) Officers Model Match revolvers chambered in .22WMR dribbled out of the factory, and perhaps not in serial number order. That is why a letter is needed on this rare revolver.

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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The Consummate Collector
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Another example to view:



The serial number is 780xx. I don't think that the stocks on Bushwacker's .22 mag. are correct. I think they should be unvarnished like the ones shown on his .22 or this one.
 

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1960 apparently was the transition year from full-checkered stocks to the style shown on the first OMM above, at least for Pythons. (There is a LONG thread on that subject. No one knows if the transition was sudden, or intermixed for a long time. We can only speculate.) Depending on the supply of full-checkered stocks with silver medallions on hand and the sale rate of the OMM, full-checkered stocks could have continued longer, or shorter than the Python transition. That is one of the reasons why every one of these scarce guns should be lettered. Cam, is yours lettered? If so, what is the ship date?

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.)
 

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I know it is a diffferent animal but my 1961 3-5-7 came with the full checkered stocks.
Do you have a letter with the build and ship dates? Since 1961 was the last year for the "357," it is possible there were some odd events at the end of production. Whenever I see a set of full-checkered stocks on a revolver that probably should not have them, I recall the posts of SaxonPig, who has installed full-checkered stocks on every E-/I-frame Colt he owns. There is no denying the visual appeal of the full-checkered stocks, which is bound to account for their present on some guns not originally equipped with them.

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.) (Ditto for my last post above, where I forgot to put this disclaimer!)
 

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I have not lettered it. I currently have two that I would like to have lettered but need to invest some time into trying to procure them. Guess I should head to the colt site and dive into it some.
 

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Procurement is easy. For an OMM, send $75, the serial number and the description to:

Colt Archive Properties LLC
P.O. Box 1868
Hartford, CT 06144

Wait four to five months, maybe longer, and the letter will appear in your mail box. Enjoy. (AND report back!)

Research done! Get the order out tomorrow!

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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Thanks for sharing guys! Being the newbie that I am I had no idea that .22mag firearms were that old. Do the older models have any recoil to speak of? I have a Keltec .22 mag that I just bought and I thought I was on the cutting edge of technology. You just don't hear that much about that caliber.
 

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... I had no idea that .22mag firearms were that old. Do the older models have any recoil to speak of?
The .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire was introduced in 1959, but Winchester did not have a rifle chambered for the cartridge for a year or so after introduction! This is one case where Colt was on the cutting edge!

I do not understand your statement that we do not hear much about the cartridge. It has been a staple of the shooting world since 1959, and has recently spawned some .17-caliber variants that have everybody excited.

The age of the firearm does not affect the felt recoil. Weight and grip shape are the main factors in felt recoil.

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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You will have to pardon my ignorance. When I was a child my father had two .22 rifles. I knew there were two bullets (short or long) in that caliber. At least that's all I heard about back then. I had assumed that the .22 was primarily used for target shooting or small varmints like your neighbor's annoying cat.

I would certainly like to be more educated if someone would indulge me. It's called "Officers Model Match" in one of the posts. Was it a carry firearm by LEOs ? I'm curious about it's primary usage back then and what it was up against.
 

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The entire Colt Officers Model line (chronologically Officers Model, Officers Model Target, Officers Model Special, Officers Model Match, Officers Model Match Mark III), from 1904 through 1970, was intended primarily as target revolvers. Other brands offered target revolvers as well. Smith & Wesson would be the primary competitor. Smith offered Military & Police target revolvers, followed by the Masterpiece line, as the most direct competitors of which I am aware. I am not sure if Smith collectors consider the Outdoorsman revolvers as primarily target revolvers, but they have adjustable sights.

Some target revolvers surely saw police service, but that was not their primary purpose. The Colt Trooper introduced in 1954 was Colt's first attempt at a police service revolver with adjustable sights.

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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The Consummate Collector
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1960 apparently was the transition year from full-checkered stocks to the style shown on the first OMM above, at least for Pythons. (There is a LONG thread on that subject. No one knows if the transition was sudden, or intermixed for a long time. We can only speculate.) Depending on the supply of full-checkered stocks with silver medallions on hand and the sale rate of the OMM, full-checkered stocks could have continued longer, or shorter than the Python transition. That is one of the reasons why every one of these scarce guns should be lettered. Cam, is yours lettered? If so, what is the ship date?

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.)
I have not lettered mine. I have to many pre war Colts that need lettering first. May get to this one by 2022.
 

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Guys, I just picked up a OMM .22 Mag last night (S/N 788xx) I don't know anything about them so I was searching the sight for info and found this thread. Mine has the same grips as the OP's with no thumb rest on the right side. As soon as I clean it up and shoot some pics….I will post it.
 
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