Colt Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello. I'm just curious, will a Python withstand great amount of repeated quick double-action shots? Or would this kind of shooting wear the fine mechanics of this beautiful sixgun. Is it better suited for precise single shot target shooting?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
Yes, it will promote the timing problems of the older action Colts like the Python. That's why you seldom see the Python used in the fast paced action shooting games of today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
I keep hearing about timing issues... What exactly do you mean??? I continue to hear that the Python is the best there is/yet there are timing issues... Tell me what the timing iossue is, or if is not a true/realistic issue... I will also start a new thread pertaining to this issue as well...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
Timing in a revolver means that certain parts have to perform their job in a certain sequence at a precise time.
When you pull the trigger in a double action stroke the bolt must drop.
The hand raises and engages the ratchet to push the cylinder around.
The trigger engages the hammer on the double action sear and forces it to cock.
The bolt pops back up as they cylinder turns and slides into the bolt cuts on the cylinder to stop the rotation.
The hand keeps pressure on the cylinder holding it firmly in place with the bolt locked into the bolt cut.
The trigger pushes free of the hammer's double action sear and the hammer then falls.

The portion of the hand engaging the ratchet on the ejector is the thin, small tip which must take the punishment of pushing the heavy cylinder around and withstand the shock of the cylinder suddenly stopping as the bolt pops in place on the bolt cut. The faster you shoot the revolver the faster the cylinder turns and the greater the force is applied to the tip of the hand causing it to wear.
The design of other makers, such as S&W, have the hand disengage the ratchet before the bolt locks up in the bolt cut, so it never endures the battering. The difference being that the Colt's chamber is held firmly in line with the bore by two opposing forces (the hand and the bolt), while the S&W's chamber is held loosely by the bolt only and the bullet is allowed to rotate the cylinder slightly as it passes into the forcing cone for the alignment with the bore.
Cock a Colt and release the hammer while continuing to hold the trigger fully back and see that there is no rotational play. Do the same with a S&W and generally you will get some minor rotational play.
When the Colt hand wears the revolver will begin to behave like a S&W and have some rotational play. This will cause the chamber to be pushed further around until the point where the chamber is no longer perfectly aligned with the bore. The bullet then gets shaved as it pass into the forcing cone which is known as spitting lead.
I hope I haven't left anything out in this long winded thought, but someone will correct what I missed or screwed up.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top