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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have admired and collected these pistols for years (and years) and currently own three: a John Rigby retailed conehammer sold to Ford Barclay in March of 1899, a hunter, traveler, and also an officer in Kitchener's Horse, who most assuredly took it with him to the Boer War; a Westley Richards retailed conehammer sold to Sir R. Wilson in January 1900, a diplomat and financier, probably carried by him on trips to Canada and the US; and an elaborate wartime commercial with stag grips with an non-factory engraving style attributed to Mexico or Persia, displayed with a Heiser holster and various vintage ammunition.



Anyone else enamored with these pistols?
 

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I like em and almost bought one once, but an 1882 Colt SAA was also on the table and...you know the rest.
 

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My uncle gave me this one. My grandfather acquired it during WWI and brought it back to the US when he returned from his service in Europe. It is in excellent condition with all matching numbers including the stock. I shoot a few rounds through it about once a year.

 

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I should have bought one back when they were $3-4-5-600. This thing is a rehabilitated rechambered rebarreled reimport.
It is a good job, but it ain't like one in original condition.
I did not get skun on it, but it wasn't cheap like they used to be. I just had to have one.
 

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Truly a magnificent firearm for its day in history. I have handled a few of these and just didn't like the feel of it at all. The grip shape and design doesn't fit me. Same with other grip styles, great guns but I shoot my guns and they have to fit me. I don't own a Bisley for the same reason.

Great collection you have OP and I admire what you have put together.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #12
...........I have handled a few of these and just didn't like the feel of it at all. The grip shape and design doesn't fit me..........Jim
That is interesting 459459 because I thought I wouldn't like it when I curiously first picked one up years ago but was surprised by how good it felt in my hand.

Thank you all for posting your broomhandles and commenting. It is funny how some of you had to have one. My problem as well and it's happened twice with British retailer marked conehammers. Interesting to me because, thanks to British record keeping, you can find out who purchased them and research the history. Luckily they are mostly too dang expensive now or I'd have a passel of them.
 

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it was a bucket list gun for me, but I'm frugal (okay cheap). right after the sandy hook shooting, when glocks and AK prices were going thru the roof. I put a WASR 10 on backpage for trade. guy had one of those 80s china mixmaster imports bored to 9mm that he offered to trade.
He couldnt believe I would trade a AK47 for a broomhandle, but I only had $250 in the ak and i knew if I sold the AK for cash I wouldnt spend the money on a broomy. The guy did point out the AK would sell For more than the pistol was worth and he planned on selling the AK. I didnt care, the AK was advertised the next day for 1200. I've still got the broomhandle, and still have plenty of AKs so it was a win for me. jim
 

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I bought this 1930 Commercial with holster stock a few years ago. I have always wanted one of the early ones with retailer markings, either British or US like VL&D. It really is fun to shoot with the newly manufactured 7.63x25 ammo from PPU. I did replace every spring in it and carefully checked the bolt stop. I had some problems with pierced primers and a new firing pin spring has solved that.
 

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Truly a magnificent firearm for its day in history. I have handled a few of these and just didn't like the feel of it at all. The grip shape and design doesn't fit me. Same with other grip styles, great guns but I shoot my guns and they have to fit me. I don't own a Bisley for the same reason.

Great collection you have OP and I admire what you have put together.

Jim
I do understand the atypical 'feel' of the pistol in the hand, but when you stick the buttstock on it, it becomes an outrageously handy carbine. I actually prefer it in that configuration.
 

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I could just never fall in love with the C96, but if you were going to own just one, the cone hammer shown by cloverleaf would be the one to own. Beautiful workmanship.

If shooting it with the stock, don't grasp the stock with your thumb over the the wrist of the stock as everything comes crashing back over it.
 

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Two world war bring backs- one came back from WW I France with my wife’s grandfather who said he got it from someone who didn’t need it anymore and the other came back with my father from occupied Japan after WW II. He was billeted on a ship and saw a line of soldiers and sailors and asked the last man in line what they were waiting for. “ There’s a guy up there handing out pistols.” My dad received one, the guy had found a crate of them and was giving them away. Dad went to the local police department when he got back to Detroit to ask if he needed to register it. The desk sergeant looked it over and told him not to worry about it as it didn’t have a firing pin. I pestered dad often to get the pistol down and show it to me, one time after looking at it I told him it did have a firing pin and showed it to him. We eventually got a box of cartridges and fired it, I still do now and then. I credit the Broomhandle with feeding my lifelong interest in firearms from a very early age.
OP, that’s a fine Heiser you have.
Regards,
turnerriver
 

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I do understand the atypical 'feel' of the pistol in the hand, but when you stick the buttstock on it, it becomes an outrageously handy carbine. I actually prefer it in that configuration.

I'll be the "oddball".:rolleyes: I find them comfortable to shoot, and accurate to boot. I shoot one handed(can shoot well either with left or right hand:cool:). I think the trick is, you just don't grab it too high. My hand doesn't go higher than the wooden grips.

On the other hand, I find no joy shooting with the stock mounted. If I want to go for more than 50 meters I will just use a "true" carbine.
 

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I have had several C96s, but right now I only have two: One 1897 Mauser Conehammer and a Chinese .45 Shansei. I just can't shoot a Broomhandle, the rounded grip maes it feel like you're witching for water and with the bore sitting way above your hand it's pretty darn difficult to shoot accurately. It's still a lot of fun though :D
 

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I had one many years ago. It was a pretty plain 30 Mauser with the holster/stock. The way all the parts fit together (without screws) is genius. The only flaw I can think of is that it can be assembled incorrectly and then difficult to disassemble. I always thought someone should make a modern version of this design. How about a modern version that shoots 500 Smith & Wesson or 44 Magnum or 45 Winchester Magnum. Since the ammo does not go in the grip, you could design it to use an AR-15 grip. With all the various AR-15 grips, everyone could find one that fits their hand and helps with recoil. Of course, it needs to have a detachable box magazine like the M712 plus a rail or two for accessories.
 
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