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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a nice 1962 Det. Special that is at least 95% and a very good shooter. I bought it about six months ago, and have put 300 +/- rounds through it. I carry it from time to time in place of a "J" frame.


A friend of mine had his refinished Corba bobbed on my suggestions and it made it even slicker to carry. Should I do the same with mine? Will it destroy the value if professionally done? I paid $350 for this gem.

HiCap
 

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If you feel the D.S. is collectable in the future,then I would find a correct second hammer for it,and have IT bobbed; D frame parts are not that hard to come by,especially on "fleabay".

Your other option,is to find a factory hammer shroud. This requires drilling a couple of other holes,to install,but leaves a little of the hammer spur "showing for single action cocking. Some collectors don't mind this addition;others do.

My "guess" is that the extra hammer/installation would be a little less $$ than buying a shroud and its installation.

My D.S is 30 years older than yours,and an excellent shooter also,but it is in "semi retirement" as a desk drawer gun. Bud
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally


A friend of mine had his refinished Corba bobbed Should I do the same with mine? Will it destroy the value if professionally done? I paid $350 for this gem.

HiCap[/B]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Just my opinion, but I wouldn't buy a used revolver that was bobbed. I don't necessarily think it hurts the firearm, I just personally would not have any interest in it.

I don't think the garden variety Colt revolvers are going to all be collectables anyway, so I wouldn't worry too much about ruining the value of it. If you want to bob it, bob it... Then if you decide to sell it later you will probably run up on someone who likes the "bobbed" look.

I'd do whatever I wanted to with it. Fix it up like you like it, enjoy shooting it. That's what these neat revolvers are made for.

Best Wishes, and just my old fart opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Laserlips, I too am an old pharrt. I started shooting with my dad's 2" 32 Pocket Positive when I was 8, in 1941. Damn, but he sold it when I was in the Army.

Anyway, my DS shoots so well I probably won't modify it. I'll just be careful when I extract it.

Thanks to all for the advice.

HiCap a/k/a Peter
 

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Gentlemen,
Somewhere, years ago, I read an article from somebody who I respected and they carried on at length - and convincingly, about guys bobbing hammers and cutting away trigger guards and filing front sights and such and convinced me to, "live the pure life," and stay as factory issued. Then, I discovered, "Fitz," of earlier Colt fame with his tricked out .45 revolvers and all sorts of cuts and add-ons and filings and pocket holsters. EVERYTHING I'D JUST BEEN WARNED AGAINST! And he knew what he was doing and could probably outshoot me blindfolded! Since, I keep my nose out of guys, "customizing," their guns! FWW, I draw conclusions from my real trade, which is music ... I've got about 50+ trombone mouthpieces sitting on a shelf and these puppies cost about $50+ apiece. I've picked them up over 30 years and with each one, I thought I could play better ... THIS one would do somthing the others didn't. Well, you haven't seen any CD's with my name on 'em lately, have you!? The niche I've adopted is stay with factory standards and just practice! I'm sure Bill Jordan would have had no problem qualifying with my Official Police and Tommy Dorsey would sound just as sweet playing my trombone as his. FWW, remember.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
rcwambold, I couldn't have said it better. I, too, have had to modify with this or that, but I always come back to the tool as it came from the factory. Bobbing does do away with a snag, but I can work around that.

HiCap
 

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There is a downside, and I'm not sure you can "modify" your way around it. Here goes: the loaded and bobbed Colt has the hammer started back by pulling the trigger. Then the user makes a mistake and pulls the hammer back the rest of the way, using his thumb. Result: loaded and cocked sixgun that maybe can't be uncocked 'cept by firing. I mean, will that certain user be able to slowly lower the bobbed hammer while pulling the trigger?

Bart Noir
 

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Bart,

This is a non-problem. When you bob the second hammer, you also should remove the cocking ledge on that hammer.

BTW, I think that bobbing a second hammer is a great idea. I have an Agent with a bobbed hammer that I had originally done for a Diamondback, and I have an older bobbed-hammer DS that I bought for $90 from a policeman who wanted something lighter. His father had bobbed it, for good reason, but on the original hammer. BTW, that was absolutely the cleanest used gun I have ever seen in my life. I guess when your Dad cleans your carry gun and you're a cop, he does it right.
 

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Dehorning the hammer of a revolver is pretty much an individual choice. Most folks probably shouldn't do it because they don't really need to and because they won't work hard enough to learn the proper manual of arms. AND, of course, it does affect resale unless you purchase another hammer for dehorning. When I was growing up, it was pretty standard practice for serious gun handlers to remove the spur for a belly gun or for a pocket revolver.

Cutting off the hammer spur certainly should NOT be done unless the individual is willing to learn the proper manual of arms to use it safely. With a little common sense and assiduous practice, dehorning a revolver does not preclude either cocking for SA fire nor lowering the hammer safely. It does help to groove the top of the dehorned hammer for a secure purchase when lowering it. It DOES require a fair bit of practise to do so securely and reliably.

Nor does one need to remove the little cut at the base of the hammer that will turn the piece into a DA only sidearm, though that surely is an option. A DA revolver IS after all designed to be fired in the DA mode. Personally, I see no reason for limiting the ability to fire a more precise shot with the single action capability by eliminating the SA function.

Eliminating the SA function in a DA sidearm is, to me, much like buying a DAO autoloader. The DAO autoloader is well described by Cooper's classic response: a not so clever solution to a non-existant question. It's a bureaucratic concept to prevent untrained or minimally trained folks from engaging in a specific form of negligent discharge rather than a particularly useful addition to the defensive handgun arsenal.



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"And the blithe revolver began to sing/ To the blade that twanged on the locking-ring..."
 
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