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Discussion Starter #1
Timing question:

Yesterday I noticed something strange. 3 of the 6 chambers can be easily “staged”, you can hear the cilinder notch snap in the cilinder with a loud click . After 1mm or so the hammer drops.

The other 3 chambers(in row that is) on the other hand are a bit “ late “ with there timing and are locked when the hammer drops. When I speed up the DA there is no problem , it only occurs when I stage the trigger slowly.

It seems in my opion it has got something to do with the ratchets.(doesn’t carry up enough) When speeding up DA the momentum of the cilinder locks the cilinder so it doesn’t exhibit.

So what is wise? Leave it as it is and accept the “late” timing of the three chambers or got this addressed by a qualified gunsmith.
 

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When one chamber times late, it's usually a problem with a single lug on the ejector ratchet.

When THREE fail, it's often a symptom of some other problem, like a sprung crane.

In this case I'd probably have a Colt qualified pistolsmith look at it.

BE CAREFUL. VERY few of today's gunsmiths understand the Python action, NO MATTER WHAT THEY MAY SAY.

I'm not sure how you go about shipping a gun to Colt from Europe, but you might contact Colt and ask who they recommend there.

Years ago, Colt's Authorized factory repair service in Holland was:
Dorhout Mees B. V.
Strandgaperweg, 30
Biddinghuizen
Holland.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you dfariswheel for the info .I will check certainly if Dorthout Mees is still a qualified Colt gunsmith.

Question: what is a sprung crane?

Furthermore I checked the ratchets and I see no evidence of tempering what so ever. Wouldn't expect that of a almost NIB Peacekeeper. Hand looks oke.

There seems to be a difference in the ratchets. 4 of them are "fat" and the 2 others are "thinner". The "thinner" ones don't exhibit the late timing.
I reckon that the gun was shipped from Colt this way. Could it be that the hand got stuck because of the "fat" ratchets......
 

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The crane is the arm the cylinder is attached to and on which the cylinder swings out on.

A "sprung" or bent crane can cause all sorts of problems in revolvers.
In essence, a bent crane can cause the cylinder to no longer:
Lock properly in the frame.(You have to push on the cylinder to get it to lock in place).
The chambers won't align with the bore properly.
Timing may be off.
The gun may spit bullet metal out the sides of the cylinder.
And several other problems.

In other words, a dropped or abused gun with a bent crane means the cylinder is no long squarely in line with the bore. The cylinder is at an angle with the bore.

In your case, the different width ratchets is VERY suspicious, but not necessarily a problem.

The Peacekeeper, like all the later Colt's like the Trooper Mark III and King Cobra work quite differently than the older Colt's like the Python.

On the older guns, the LENGTH of the hand that pushes the cylinder around is the key item.
On these guns ratchet THICKNESS is critical. A ratchet thats too thick will cause problems like you're having.

BUT......

On the Peacekeeper, the hand WIDTH is the key.
On these guns, the ratchet lug LENGTH is critical.
In other words, the length of the ratchet lug measured from the center of the ejector to the outer ends of the ratchet.

A ratchet that has varying lengths on 2 or 3 adjacent lugs is almost certainly a matter of a ratchet that was fitted off-center.
This would require either refitting the ratchet, or simply fitting a new ratchet.

In any case, I'd recommend having a Colt qualified pistolsmith look at this, since ratchets are so critical to proper operation and accuracy.
 
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