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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bought an after market mainspring through Gunparts. Their wasn't anything wrong with my original spring which I will keep. I had heard the aftermarket spring was lighter pull and it surly is. I don't have a trigger scale but I would say the weights have been cut in half. The claw is three times longer that on the original which makes putting it in a pieta. But the outcome is worth the struggle. Highly recommend it if you use your 1917 as a shooter.:cool:
 

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This was maybe thirty years ago but the mainspring in the 1917 I had at the time needed replacing. I found on through Gun Parts as well...don't know whether it was aftermarket or genuine Colt...but it worked fine. That was a fine revolver...it was one of the guns I sold to finance a divorce.
 

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Just the price that had to be paid. I won't criticize my first wife...she's a fine woman and nothing changes that. We weren't suited for one another and that's what happened. Wife 2.0 and I are a much better match and am much happier for it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Met my wife while on temporary duty in Louisiana, on a Monday and asked her to marry me that Thursday. Asked why she agreed and was told she saw me in a dream prior to our meeting. 45 years and three sons later must have been a good dream.:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
After shooting my 1917, I put back my original mainspring. The double action was great, nice and smooth. The single action was to light for my taste.
 

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After shooting my 1917, I put back my original mainspring. The double action was great, nice and smooth. The single action was to light for my taste.
Too light?

It must have been pretty light. I would like to know exactly how light, in case there is something more at play as it seems odd a spring replacement alone would make SA pull too light to feel safe.

I can tolerate a SA pull down to 2#. Once you go under 2#s it really starts to become a hair trigger and encroach on safety. My '72 has a 2# 2oz SA trigger pull, and 7# DA pull, but that was after extensive action work. Before I re-cut the trigger sear in my S&W 629, it had 1# SA pull, but it also exhibited push off because the sear was buggered. Now it's about 2.5# and safe.

You can "tweak" the spring to control the tension. Reference the shop manual, or one of the Smithing sections Sticky threads. I'm pretty sure I explain spring tweaking in one of them. You should grab a trigger pull scale. Never hurts to have one around for this very reason. I love the digital Lyman.
 

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You really need just a simple fishing gauge to check trigger pull, guessing without a gauge is just that, guessing. One can also of course bend the V mainspring a bit to make the pull lighter. On my target colt double actions, I am pretty satisfied at about 3 1/2 lbs. and crisp. I had a 357 model set at about 2 3/4 lbs. and let a bafoon shoot it once. I still remember the first round going off while he was cocking it at the 12 o’clock position.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't have a scale, but when at the range it went off as I was leveling the sight. That was just a little to light for my taste. The standard spring is just right on single action, just a tad heavy on double. I will say this, with the lighter spring shooting a ragged hole in the center of the Target at 10 yards was no problem in double action.
 
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