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As I thought, one gets an old worn out SAA redone for the love of it!
View attachment 651923 View attachment 651925 View attachment 651927 Turnbull Restore Original Grips.JPG Turnbull Restore Before.JPG

You're right I had Turnbull restore this Bisley for me. It was made in 1900 and had no known history. It had no broken parts and all appeared to be original. I wanted it to look and function like it just left the factory. So I took it to a gun show where Turnbull had a display, and spoke with Doug Turnbull (also a great guy) who questioned why I wanted it restored and did it have any history. He agreed that he would restore it and I was given an approximate quote of between $4000 and $4500. I left it with them and after many months(10) I got back a beautifully restored gun. The restoration cost me $4100 and I originally paid $1700 for the gun. That's a lot of money and I'm sure more than it's worth now, but I don't care, I have a beautiful gun that will only grow in value as it is handed down in the family.
 

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Understanding what goes into a restoration is an important aspect of the decision to restore a piece. I'm afraid that many who are doing and doing it well pad up the cost for various business reasons and "requirements". This has been the bane of any kind of restoration work, be it paintings, furniture or firearms. It's like going to the auto mechanic with a minor problem that turns into a larger, more costly one. The best shops spend money on quality marking dies and other equipment. if used correctly, the results are wonderful. The best of the best have owned original pieces and replicate that look in their restoration work. Sole props like me and Al can provide better details to attention than the larger shops with many employees. (more employees, more cost) Any restored piece should be compared to an original by the customer for fit, finish, accuracy of markings and of course function. Where most shops fail in is the details - missing markings, wrong polishing planes, colors off, blue wrong and so fourth. The photos show some very high quality work, but there is something missing. I'll let you guys figure it out.

Dave
 

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View attachment 651923 View attachment 651925 View attachment 651927 View attachment 652065 View attachment 652067

You're right I had Turnbull restore this Bisley for me. It was made in 1900 and had no known history. It had no broken parts and all appeared to be original. I wanted it to look and function like it just left the factory. So I took it to a gun show where Turnbull had a display, and spoke with Doug Turnbull (also a great guy) who questioned why I wanted it restored and did it have any history. He agreed that he would restore it and I was given an approximate quote of between $4000 and $4500. I left it with them and after many months(10) I got back a beautifully restored gun. The restoration cost me $4100 and I originally paid $1700 for the gun. That's a lot of money and I'm sure more than it's worth now, but I don't care, I have a beautiful gun that will only grow in value as it is handed down in the family.
This piece had original finish remaining.........

JP
 

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View attachment 651923 View attachment 651925 View attachment 651927 View attachment 652065 View attachment 652067

You're right I had Turnbull restore this Bisley for me. It was made in 1900 and had no known history. It had no broken parts and all appeared to be original. I wanted it to look and function like it just left the factory. So I took it to a gun show where Turnbull had a display, and spoke with Doug Turnbull (also a great guy) who questioned why I wanted it restored and did it have any history. He agreed that he would restore it and I was given an approximate quote of between $4000 and $4500. I left it with them and after many months(10) I got back a beautifully restored gun. The restoration cost me $4100 and I originally paid $1700 for the gun. That's a lot of money and I'm sure more than it's worth now, but I don't care, I have a beautiful gun that will only grow in value as it is handed down in the family.
Turnbull is by far the best IMHO. He is also very honest in discussing the cost and whether it’s worth it to YOU to spend the $$$
 

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Even this photo shows blue on the trigger guard, ejector tube, barrel, some on the sides of the back strap, and traces of case color.
 

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Even this photo shows blue on the trigger guard, ejector tube, barrel, some on the sides of the back strap, and traces of case color.
This gun is blue where it is supposed to be blue and case colored where it is supposed to be, I don't understand where you're coming from. I accept that you guys do good work, but I believe Turnbull is the best!
 

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This gun is blue where it is supposed to be blue and case colored where it is supposed to be, I don't understand where you're coming from. I accept that you guys do good work, but I believe Turnbull is the best!
AGGIEBILL there’s a creed among the finest in the business to not alter a gun with remaining finish.
We all know that piece won’t stay in ones collection a lifetime and for the sake historical significance it should live out its life in the condition it is...original.
 

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I wonder how future generations of collectors will evaluate all of these redone guns as to originality, and consequently value.
 

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Many will become " Original Finish Guns " as time passes. As some will be used and accumulate natural wear and use patina they will become very hard to tell from an original except to an expert who will occasionally be wrong. I am guessing there are more engraved and restored guns out there then original guns with 25 percent finish and above. We are our own worst enemy when it comes to preserving history.
 

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AGGIEBILL there’s a creed among the finest in the business to not alter a gun with remaining finish.
We all know that piece won’t stay in ones collection a lifetime and for the sake historical significance it should live out its life in the condition it is...original.
Is this original? Turnbull Restore Before.jpg Or is this original? Turnbull Restore Original Grips.jpg To me this is original and should live out its life as it came from the factory.
 
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