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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Lots of really wonderful old Colts and related on this guys site.

I just happened to be browsing a little, and noticed this Colt 1860 'relic'.



1860 Colt Army-Relic - Historical and Antique Collectibles.


Some of what is interesting about it to me, is that it seems to show some affirmation, in it's manner of decay, for the notion of the Cylinder being Cast steel, and, the Frame and Barrel, being of forged Wrought Iron.

Note the 'fiberous' structure and how it 'flows', which I take to demonstrate the way the Metal was forged into the shapes which were then Machined.

The Cylinder shows no such 'fiberous' or differentially eroded endemic structure.


A Wrought Iron heavy with Manganese, I think would likely hold up well in a damp repose, as this one had, while other kinds of Wrought Iron composition would puff up something terrible, like Filo Dough sheets or Baklava, Lol...

Some Forged Steels could differentially erode or show 'fiberous' stratifications also, but, that would imply a somewhat non-homogeneous Steel, and thus, to my mind, such differential erosion is more likely to suggest a Wrought Iron than a Steel proper.


Are there any Metallurgists here to help me out in my conjectures with this?


Has anyone ever come across any information relating to any serious Spectrometry Tests having been done, with a view of identifying the Elements which are present in the Alloys of the old Colt Percussion Revolvers?

I know there was someone in passing, who posted a Thread about Spectrometry having been done to differentiate authentic from fake or emulated Walkers.

But, I do not recall getting anywhere in trying to discuss the matter with them.

Nor was I satisfied that all 'Genuine' Walkers would per-se show the identical Alloy of any parts from one Revolver to another, and, this also failed to achieve any discussion, far as I recall.

So, other than that example ( which maybe was no example at all, or was managed so cryptically as to amount to about none at all, ) has anyone done Spectrometry Analysis on old Colt Cap & Ball Revolvers, that any of us have read or heard of?
 

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Oye,

Can't help you with your question but thanks for the link. Never been on this site before and he has a lot of interesting things.
 

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HaHaHaHa what a price they aske for a relic. Come on you have the real thing in a reasneble state for that price? What are they thinking?

But thanks for the link. I did not know this site.
 

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It looks like a good site, but optimistic prices.
I worked in metallurgy a bit, once upon a time. My father in law had given me a book about it that I just threw away a few months ago.
It is an interesting site. I would like to browse there someone more, someday.
dc
 

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Twaits - Is there a story or link to go with that picture?
I tried to find the story but couldn't. The only info I could find is "Canvas print A skeleton with a gun in the sand by Paul Chesley / National Geographic - ready-to-hang wall picture, stretched on canvas frame, printed image"
You used to be able to buy it on amazon apparently.
 
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