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Who is the best gunsmith for tuning the Anaconda action? What can they get single and double action pull down to in pounds?

Thanks



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Cal Bear
 

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I'm not a gunsmith. However I design tooling on which gun parts are made, and have tuned most of my (far too many) firearms myself.

As revolver designs go, the internal layout of an Anaconda, when compared to a Python, or even an N frame Smith, is almost starkly elegant in its simplicity. This cuts two ways. The buttery slick, slightly stacking pull, followed by the sudden crisp break of a well tuned Python or Officers Model Target is not quite attainable, but a home smith can markedly improve things without getting into trouble.

First, you want to reduce friction. This will entail deburring, improving the surface finish, and just barely breaking corners on all surfaces that bear on the sideplates or other parts when the elements of the action rotate. Don't touch sears and bents, the hand except to deburr the pivot hole, or the end of the bolt that engages the cylinder at this time. Use a medium India triangle, the idea is not so much removing metal as removing roughness. This alone will help noticeably if your Anaconda's sintered parts are as rough as those in either of mine were.

Second, depending on the ammunition you plan to use, you might wish to consider changing springs. Wolff makes replacement main springs for this revolver in lighter than factory ratings. I have found that for my purposes the 10# spring works, giving 100% reliability, while the 8# spring is too light. YMMV. BTW, the factory main spring is rated at 14#, if memory serves. Wolff also makes a trigger return spring: in my revolvers its' installation didn't make much, if any, difference.

At this point, SA pull should be in the neighborhood of 3-4# and DA pull about 9-11#, there should also be a significant improvement in perceived smoothness.

Third, if you are not mechanically declined, look at the sears and bents. Any work you do with a stone must not get the engagement surfaces even slightly out of square, nor is it advisable to remove more than roughness unless you know exactly what you are doing. You probably will notice more of a difference in the quality of the trigger break than pull as a result of your work in this area unless you are determined to have a lighter trigger than I need or want. Again, unless you have a special purpose in mind, and know what you are about, do no more than improve the finish in this area, don't change any angles, and don't remove more than a few ten thousandths of an inch stock in an effort to get a lighter pull.

After working on the sear group, removing burrs from the latch pin, and its' seat in the extractor star (don't confuse burrs with any staking you might find here), the windows in the frame for the hand and bolt (don't widen the windows, just remove any burrs). SA pull should be about 3# & DA pull about 8¬Ω-9#.

I'd wholeheartedly recommend the purchase of Jerry Kuhnhausen's little book titled The Colt Double Action Revolvers, Volume II, VSP press, 1988. While this doesn't specifically deal with the Anaconda, it does give a great deal of information that will be of use to you. (This book covers the very similar action in the Trooper Mk III & V, the King Corba etc. It is available from Brownell's.

Two observations: I've seen several Anacondas wherein the firing pin protrusion is greater than desirable. Because of the inertial type design it doesn't really hurt anything, on the other hand, I was able to get a bit of mass out of the hammer in correcting this situation. You might want to check this out. Second, the sideplate plays a role in cylinder timing, and must not be warped, even slightly. Don't pry the sideplate off. Instead, after "fixing in place" the mainspring on the mainspring guide with a bent open paperclip pushed through the hole in the guide, tap the frame on the forward edge of the grip area, about in the middle, with a (wooden) hammer handle while you have a your left thumb lightly holding the cylinder latch. The sideplate will pop free, and you won't lose the latch spring.

Bob

[This message has been edited by bfoster (edited 07-26-2001).]
 
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