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I'd like to have some safes in my basement. I have 3 big ones, but because of the doorway angle and weight, I can't move mine down there. The modular idea appeals to me. I've been reading up on the subject some but would like input from members who might have one. Thanks
 

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Everything I've studied about these say if your buying a quality safe that they are just as sound as a traditional safe. Don't tweezer yourself unless maybe your just storing ammo in it. Quality ones are heavy also but at least they come in pieces.
 

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I don't have a modular safe. Thought about buying one but they don't look very sturdy. My suggestion would be to buy a vault door and build a safe room/closet. Good luck and be safe.

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I have had a Zanotti for about 15 years. I think it is a very good safe and was easy to get in my basement which otherwise would have been impossible.

There is no fire proofing. I knew that going in and I accepted that. I have had two acquaintances who have had fires and both lost their guns anyway.
 

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Have you considered multiple smaller safes? There are several advantages to that approach.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't have a modular safe. Thought about buying one but they don't look very sturdy. My suggestion would be to buy a vault door and build a safe room/closet. Good luck and be safe.

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My goal was to pour a 20x20 or so vault on the side on the garage. But....I've also been thinking of thinning out some guns in which case a vault wouldn't make much sense. Another thought was to just put a vault door in the basement. But then, I've got all the plumbing above and no fire proof...I still want a poured vault big enough for not only the guns but other 'junk' that is irreplaceable. The modular idea seemed like a way to compromise some. I could then sell my other safes to offset some cost.
 

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Yes but too many combinations to remember. :confused:
That reminds me of a story.

When I bought the Zanotti they told me not to lose the combination as they keep no record of it like many safe manufactures do. They did at first but a person called them up with all the pertinent info on the safe and said they lost it. They verified the person and gave it out.

The person turned out to be the owner's ex-wife to be and she took all the guns and sold them.

Zanotti had to pay a serttlement.
 

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Remember one and put the numbers for the next one it it-coded if you like and then do the same for each one.I have 6 done that way.
 

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I'd like to have some safes in my basement. I have 3 big ones, but because of the doorway angle and weight, I can't move mine down there. The modular idea appeals to me. I've been reading up on the subject some but would like input from members who might have one. Thanks
I have a Snap Safe which is a modular currently sold by Hornady. The heaviest component was the door, which weighs approximately 95 pounds (this is for the "Super Titan" model. I assembled it by myself - wasn't too bad (I'm 70+ years old). Very sturdy once you get it together. Has fireproofing and a digital lock. Quite a bit of storage space, and the interior can be reconfigured. I'm happy with the safe and would recommend it. Unless you have a walkout door, you need to consider how to get the components into the basement. More info on the Hornady web site..
 

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I have two large 60 gun safes and my safe mover was able to get them thru three doors, two sets of steps and bolt them down for $125 each.
Unless it's really narrow stairs there shouldn't be an issue.
 

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I seem to remember Judge Colt might have mentioned he used one....

Judge what say you......
I say I built a vault room as part of an addition to our farm home and have never used a modular safe. I needed a very secure place to protect my treasures from the Great Pumpkin, who will steal my stuff from me if he can. (Like my Lightweight Detective Special box. :mad:)
 

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I say I built a vault room as part of an addition to our farm home and have never used a modular safe. I needed a very secure place to protect my treasures from the Great Pumpkin, who will steal my stuff from me if he can. (Like my Lightweight Detective Special box. :mad:)
Well anytime you want to visit the box let me know....you have visitation rights.....

 

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Back to the original question; I've had a Zanotti for over 20 years and am pleased with it. Very well engineered. The steel rods that join the safe sections are made to very close tolerances. I've disassembled and reassembled it six different times due to job relocations and it has remained solid and tight. The one thing that I would change is the combination dial; I would have preferred an S&G but they didn't offer it. Nevertheless, the factory lock has held up well. It just isn't as smooth as the S&G.

A few tips: 1) Lightly lube the steel rods with some grease to ease them into position (with a few taps from a small hammer). 2) Wear earplugs AND a pair of muffs when assembling the safe; it gets pretty loud inside that steel container. 3) It is possible to assemble the safe all by yourself, but installing the door is much easier with a helper to steady the door and line up the hinge pins.
 
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