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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Scored a US 1917 Rifle on GB. It's an Eddystone with a receiver SN dating it to July 1918, and a barrel dated 8-18 (with an E). Based on those numbers I am ALMOST positive that the barrel is original.
Based on that information, I'm thinking that it took a month to get over to Europe...COULD it have been used in Europe before Armistice Day?
 

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Normally the barrel predates the receiver by 1 to 3 months, as the barrel has to be there when the receiver is ready for assembly. I have no idea how accurate the serial number dates are for the Model 1917 rifle.

The official designation of the rifle is U.S. Rifle, Caliber 30, Model 1917. It is based on the British Pattern 14 rifle, but the "Pattern" is a British rifle designation.
 

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I have won some local CMP matches with mine, scoring in the low 270's. Reloads with 50 grains 4895 and surplus M2 ball 150 grain bullets. Kicks less than a Springfield but it's a heavier gun.
 

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I have an Eddystone and a Winchester 1917 rifle. The Winchester has a 4/18 dated barrel and I sure it never made it out of the US. The Eddystone was made in late 1917 and from it's condition, it never made combat.

Many years ago, I shot Military matches with a 1928, 1903 Springfield rifle and won several matches with it. After I got the Winchester years later, I would shoot it at the range and found it was just as accurate as the Springfield if not a little better. I felt the rear sights being closer to the eye and not as "complicated" as the Springfield made it a much better combat rifle than the Springfield. It's only drawback is the weight and being just "butt ugly", LOL! One thing I did like, was the shape of the Bolt handle and location; it felt good on cocking! Here is a photo of my Eddystone......

600pxM1917enfield1.jpg
 

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I came close to buying one locally. LGS had an Eddystone that looked pretty good and the price wasn't too bad. I was looking for a rifle with a receiver sight so the 1917 seemed like a good choice. Well I vacillated, and when I went to buy it the dealer offered me a price and I didn't have quite enough money. Rather then make a counteroffer I went home.

Well I'm glad I did. Some research revealed that this 1917 had a JA barrel and a birch stock, which means it was an WWII overhaul. Overall it wasn't too bad but that birch stock just didn't pass muster. The Johnson Automatics two groove barrel was nice and clean, and I think they offered it for $550.

I have an Remington 1903A3 now and the 1917 has since been sold.
 

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I doubt this rifle made it to the war.
Usually rifles were issued to troops in the US and they carried them over with them.
That late in the war, it's unlikely that it would have made it in time due to the additional training given in Europe before troops were put in the line.

I've always had the suspicion that the Model 1917 was probably the most accurate military bolt rifle of them all.
The combination of the strong Mauser type action and the high quality of American production probably made it the most accurate of the Mauser, Lee Enfield, and Springfield rifles, not to mention the Russian Mosin and Japanese Arisaka.
 

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After WWI there was a move to declare the 1917 the standard US rifle as there were more of them made and in sufficient supply. The powers that be decided that no way was the beloved and home designed 1903 going to be replaced. Even though the 1903 was a derivative of the Mauser (which we payed royalties for patent violations) it was finely built by craftsman with fine target sights...and that made the difference...not some derivative of a British rifle made in a national emergency by civilian rifle makers.
 
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I never could warm up to the 1917. Years ago I had a very nice one that I had gotten from my uncle; it shot great, but as Abwehr mentioned it was "butt ugly", and to me at the time just didn't have the "elegance" of the 1903 or 98 Mauser. I traded it straight up for a Model 27-2 Smith. Now that I've gotten a little older I can more easily appreciate the quality of the 1917, and if I could find one a reasonable price, wouldn't mind adding one to the collection.

Best regards,
 

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As much as I like the 1917 Enfield, the Springfield rifle has to be the sweetest shooting rifle ever. Here is a 1929 Springfield with the Nickel Steel Bolt. Shooting 4 positions in matches, the straight stock was just a joy to hold.

Picture 001.jpg Picture 007.jpg
 

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A 1903 with a pistol grip stock is one fine looking and fine shooting rifle. While not as finely finished, I actually prefer a 1903A3 with a pistol grip stock. The peep sight closer to my getting older by the day eyes makes for a better shooter.
 
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I shoot an M1903A1 - the piece that immediately preceded the M1 Garand - pistol grip 'Type C' stock, with no fingergrooves ala' the original M1903.

I've owned a number of Model 1917s (originals as well as rebuilds) and a couple of Pattern '14's, but never warmed to them - figuring that if I was going to shoot an 'Enfield', it'd be an SMLE - so I do, an Aussie variant built at Lithgow in '42.

The old saying was that 'The Germans built a hunting rifle, the Americans built a target rifle, and the British built a battle rifle...'

That the Model 1917 was accurate is true - the sight radius plays a big part in that, and that's why the M1903A3 was accurate as well - even getting National Match treatment post-war.

Yours has an original barrel, and was likely stored - coming out when the DCM released them after WWII.
 

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A 1931 Springfield Armory National Match rifle. Beginning in 1929 the NM rifles were fitted with the new C Type pistol grip stock. It is a much trimmer pistol grip than the WWII replacement C stocks. The NM rifles came with front and rear sight protectors which were not as much to prevent damage to the sights, but to protect the lamp black the shooters applied to the sights to keep them from reflecting light.

Also shown is Star Gage mark on muzzle.





 

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Not really...the Remington Model 30 is a sporter version of the 1917. They're fine rifles...just as strong and better balance and better looking.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have a book about the 1917s by CS Ferris. In it, he said that each manufacturer handled the dating v. receiver serial number differently. For the Eddystones, If I recall, it was kind of a potpurri but, a month or so in either direction so I'm thinking it's original. I may be wrong. Just seems kind of close to be a coincidence. But then again, they only made them for a couple of years, and they made a whole bunch.

This one has been Parkerized, so I'm thinking it went back over for round 2. It's a gray Parkerizing, not the "blued finish like Parkerizing" used at the end of WWI.
It was $500. I'm not going to worry about it one way or another. I have been on the hunt locally and online for almost a year and haven't found any for that kind of scratch. I'm tickled.

Thanks to all.
 

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When I was shooting the 1903, I prefered the Staight Stock much better and most of my "competition" were using the "C" stock. I would "snuggle" up on the stock, have the sling tight in my arm to help steady it and shoot. I also had a shooting jacket and glove too. I beat most of those guys after they "gigged" me for shooting the straight stock, LOL! Today, as Snidley stated: " The peep sight closer to my getting older by the day eyes makes for a better shooter" is TRUE, LOL!!!! Now I have to use my "Eye Pal or I can't even find the front sight on a 1903 or 1903A3, LOL!
 

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Scored a US 1917 Rifle on GB. It's an Eddystone with a receiver SN dating it to July 1918, and a barrel dated 8-18 (with an E). Based on those numbers I am ALMOST positive that the barrel is original.
Based on that information, I'm thinking that it took a month to get over to Europe...COULD it have been used in Europe before Armistice Day?
Fine rifles .
Is your's blued or parkerized ?
 
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