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Let me start by saying the gun had been cleaned and I oiled it right before I left for the range. I took my new Delta to the range yesterday and halfway through the first magazine the slide stuck to the frame. It felt weird on the 4th, then locked up on the 5th round I put through the gun. It took me a minute to unstick it, it went back to battery. I disassembled it and checked it out and reassembled. It lightly stuck once more but a quick shove got it into battery. After that, I had a few failure to lock back on the last cartridge. Otherwise, after the full 100 rounds, she seems good. I took it home, went over it with a magnifying glass, cleaned it and greased it this time. Smooth as glass. Possibly a sharp edge coming off the slide rails? any other ideas? Oh, and just some feedback on the Colt earmuffs they gave away in the promotion recently.. they might be ok for full outdoor shooting, but I was in shooting area that was enclosed on all sides but the downrange side, and the muffs don't do a great job. The shots are very loud. I toughed it out, but won't be using them again except maybe for weed whacking:)
 

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Try quality gun oil and not viscous grease. Check to ensure that the slide rails are not bent or warped - damage will show as slide drag.

If you are shooting indoors, you should be using ear plugs and muffs. The sound waves reflect off the hard surfaces and strike your body repeatedly and over a longer duration of time.
 

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I have not had what you describe happen to me personally but it is not a first of a kind of anomaly. There is one in progress on another forum right now but with a carbon steel gun. I have seen it written about about more often with stainless though.
 

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I personally do not like stainless steel, but they are fine firearms. The problem with SS is it will Gall on you. it needs to have a light coating of a high pressure grease to preven the galling.

Just in case, you might want to put some dye, like Dykem, on the slide grooves or the rails to see if there is any "high spots" that could be causing this too. If the slid and rails are good, it is just galling. Stainless Steel is softer than carbon steel so that is what causes the galling; it does not like to slide together.
 

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I've got a Delta Elite and a CZ 75 B in stainless. I've got at least a couple hundred rounds (maybe 500) through the DE and a couple thousand through the CZ. I've never heard of that problem other than on the first stainless models being produced back in the 70's and 80's. Are you sure it not just the bullet not feeding correctly? At what point is the slide sticking?
 

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One of the first AMT Hardballer pistols, back in 73 or 74. Never did get it so the slide would move. Out customer asked us to return it to the factory. He got his money back and bought a blued Goldcup.
 

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My new Delta with the rail is performing perfectly. Have about 500 rounds thru it now. My guess is that the slide rail clearance is too tight. As the gun warms up and the metal expands it catches or galls. It should loosen up after the first 500 rounds. Or you could always use some lapping compound on the rails and provide some additional clearance.

https://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-...ing-compounds/lapping-compounds-prod1137.aspx
 

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Look and see if the bevel in the recoilspring tunnel is there. On the rear end of the tunnel or channel there is supposed to be a bevel.
 

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One of the first AMT Hardballer pistols, back in 73 or 74. Never did get it so the slide would move. Out customer asked us to return it to the factory. He got his money back and bought a blued Goldcup.
I've always heard that with AMT pistols, you either got a good one or a bad one. Quality control was spotty with them to say the least. At that time the industry in general hadn't ironed out issues with stainless steel auto pistols. I guess you can say Colt and other gun makers learned from problems that AMT and a few other experienced.
 

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I'd suspect what is happening is nothing more than a new firearm working itself in.................

As far as the metal heating up and expanding............No, that's not possible for the small temperature rise that takes place.............In order to have an temp/expansion problem, the gun would need to be so hot you couldn't touch it.

Shoot it, clean it, and shoot it some more.............I'll bet its nothing more than running surfaces seating themselves..............

Tom
 

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I've always heard that with AMT pistols, you either got a good one or a bad one. Quality control was spotty with them to say the least. At that time the industry in general hadn't ironed out issues with stainless steel auto pistols. I guess you can say Colt and other gun makers learned from problems that AMT and a few other experienced.
As I understand and recall, AMT pistols had the same alloy in slides and receivers. That apparently caused the galling. The solution was Lubriplate on the rails. (I seem to recall that AMT announced a "recipe" for making rail lubricant using automatic transmission fluid and something else, maybe the aforementioned Lubriplate.) Later manufacturers used different alloys on the slides and receivers and the galling problem was eliminated. I have an early AMT Longslide that is one of my favorite pistols. I use TetraGrease on the rails instead of Lubriplate because it is cleaner, and have had no problem with galling.

The problem the OP describes with the subject pistol sounds more like a too-long link or other barrel/lug dimensions out of specification rather than galling of the rails, which has never been mentioned as a problem with Colt stainless Model O pistols. My own Delta Gold Cup stainless has never given any problem, although its round count is not high.

I suggest the OP try lubricating the barrel and slide lugs with "super grease" of some kind and see if that solves the problem.
 

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As I understand and recall, AMT pistols had the same alloy in slides and receivers. That apparently caused the galling. The solution was Lubriplate on the rails. (I seem to recall that AMT announced a "recipe" for making rail lubricant using automatic transmission fluid and something else, maybe the aforementioned Lubriplate.) Later manufacturers used different alloys on the slides and receivers and the galling problem was eliminated. I have an early AMT Longslide that is one of my favorite pistols. I use TetraGrease on the rails instead of Lubriplate because it is cleaner, and have had no problem with galling.

The problem the OP describes with the subject pistol sounds more like a too-long link or other barrel/lug dimensions out of specification rather than galling of the rails, which has never been mentioned as a problem with Colt stainless Model O pistols. My own Delta Gold Cup stainless has never given any problem, although its round count is not high.

I suggest the OP try lubricating the barrel and slide lugs with "super grease" of some kind and see if that solves the problem.
Judge,

I agree.............a too long link could be a culprit, too..............I recall the AMT issues you speak of, and the many fixes, too.

Back in the early 80's I built a Comped, long barreled Race Gun using a AMT Hard Baller.........I patterned the Compensator after one of Steve Nastoff's designs.

I was "aware" of the possibility of galling with the st. steel, so I purchased some RIG +P Stainless Steel Grease...........LOL!, that specialty grease was/is nothing more than automotive grease!...........So much for marketing!

I used that specialty grease for a while but it was messy. I then changed over to Marvel Mystery Oil... I never (with either the grease or the oil) did experience any galling that I was aware of...........

I still have the pistol, but don't shoot it much anymore.





Tom
 

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How does the slide manipulate on the receiver with the barrel and recoil system out of the gun? Checking this can help you determine if the slide sticking is as a result of slide to frame fit or barrel fit. I do not think I am going out on a limb when I say I do not suspect the factory barrel bushing as not having enough clearance.
 

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I have not had the problem with my Delta, but then the Delta is polished to a bright stainless finish, but I have had the problem on my brand new brushed stainless .38 super. it happened to me while I was attending a shoot at Wilson Combat this past spring and the gun locked up. According to the chief smith at Wilson he said it was galling and that he saw it happen a lot to the stainless steel models. I left the gun with them to do a trigger enhancement and some work to ensure that the gun does not stick any more....unfortunately I have not shot the gun since getting it back from Wilson Combat.....I guess I better shoot it to see if it still sticks.

P.S. My 38 super is in fact a new Colt and it is the only Colt 1911 brushed stainless that I have and the only Colt that has had this issue.
 

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While I know galling is not unknown with stainless pistols, Colt seems to have done their homework on the problem better than most other gunmakers. While I do prefer a nice blued gun not only for their appearance I think they're generally smoother in operation, I have found Colt stainless pistols to be trouble free in that regard. I've never had a hint of a malfunction of any kind with a Colt stainless pistol.
 

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I had a stainless 91 .38 super that did that a little when i first got it because it was ridiculously tight. Worked itself out.
 

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I suspect there's some defect causing this.
Colt wisely waited until the problems with stainless guns galling were solved before introducing their first stainless guns in the early-80's.

The issue appeared with the first stainless autos made by companies like Crown City, Vega, Essex, and AMT.
The real problem is that these were all made from cheesy quality cast steel that usually wasn't heat treated.

The castings were made by the lost wax process, but they all did it on the cheap, simply because it was cheap and they couldn't do a machined frame or slide at a low enough cost.
Many of the frames were porous and so poorly cast that the metal had slumped in some areas when cast.
This was often most noticeable in the inside of the trigger guard, which often had a melted-like look where the metal had failed to properly fill out.

These were so soft you could literally cut the frame rails with a cheap pocket knife.
Made of the same stainless alloy and not heat treated they galled like crazy.
Even S&W had problems with the early stainless Model 60 and 66 revolvers hammers and triggers. S&W solved it by stopping production of stainless hammers and triggers and giving standard color case hardened carbon parts a flash plated hard chrome finish.
This was done to reduce rusting and to make the parts blend with the rest of the stainless gun.

Colt waited until the technique of making slides and frames from two different stainless alloys and heat treating them, often to two different levels of heat treating was developed.
This pretty much eliminated the galling issue and Colt never had any problems on stainless autos or revolvers.
 

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MY 1911 seized up 3 times in less than 20 rounds..my colt was a combat elite XSE..RETURNED to colt for factory repairs..colt TOOK 27 weeks to repair an return.they replaced the slide stop pin an magazine follower..all this an only about 40 total rounds fired in a factory new 1911.AND colt had the guts to charge me \\\\\\\\:mad:
 

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I recently bought a stainless NHC, but did months of research because of concerns over galling. I found galling to be a fairly rare occurrence with today's metal processing. I'd agree with the others, that the gun is just breaking in.
 
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