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I'm going to take a guess and say he was one of many small business private makers in New Mexico. I can't find reference to him in any of my searches so far.

Is that some writing on the outside of the holster, or just some random marks? What else can you tell us about it...like where you got it, when you got it, and what gun(s) fit in it? Looks to be in decent condition, and it's a style that's familiar to everyone here I think. I always think of holsters like that as a Jesse James style holster.
 

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The actual style is called a 'Slim Jim' - almost always a crossdraw - typically, they fit the Model 1851 Navy and the Model 1860 Army, but they could fit an SAA, as well.

This one shows the ejector rod's imprint.

After C&WAS got up and rolling, leathermakers popped up and died away like mushrooms - with little documentation save for what print ads they may've engendered, and that's a pity, because some were pretty talented guys.
 

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The stitching is good and the rivet looks somewhat old school, but I'm thinking it's no older than about middle 20th century. It's stamped, not carved. The maker stamp looks pretty modern.
Here is another one: Old New Mexico marked Colt holster | #19840103
The main continuous border stamp on this holster is one I first saw in the 1980s on I think a Ted Blocker rig that Thell Reed used for fast draw shooting. I liked the stamp so bought it from Tandys. That makes me think this is a more current holster like what you’re saying. But I’m thinking even a little newer. Unless that stamp is a modern copy of an old one. But I don’t recall seeing it in real old holsters before. If it was made within the last forty years, the maker had/has an excellent historical sense. Other than that stamp, it looks pretty old and still might be.
 

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Shops like 'Wild Rose Trading Co' and 'Old West Reproduction' did this sort of work for the more historically-minded, and their work was letter-perfect.

There were a 'lot' of modern day leather makers who paid close attention to detail, but their output was always on the low side.
 

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Here are a few more that I have acquired. Thank you everyone for your input.
View attachment 745387
In Red Nichol's holster blog the other day he did a write up on a holster maker named Wyeth who made holster stamped with various store's propriety names. I think usually without his own stamp on them. A common stamp he used was a cowboy on horseback, pressed into the leather actually. I can't find Red's article now but your second holster looks just like it from my memory at least.
 

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Wyeth did make a lot of holsters - both for his own shop and for the trade as well.

The 'Slim Jim' was/is as common as the 'Mexican Loop' during the era and was almost de rigeur for one carrying a long-barrelled revolver crossdraw.

Guys wanting to replicate the older cowboy in SASS' 'Classic Cowboy' or NCOWS like them, but shooting rules preclude their use because the muzzle can cross another shooter on the line.
 

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I agree, everyone and their brother started making leather cowboy gear during the 90s-2000s for CAS. I see a lot that are pretty junky, but the OP's looks nicer. I bought a gunbelt the other day used, from a recent maker I didn't know, but since he's in Arizona I had to try it. It's pretty nice, Cochise Leather by a David LaFlair. Still around, they have a site and make saddles too, a good sign.
 

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Ryan- check your PM or give me a call please! Jim
 

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I agree, everyone and their brother started making leather cowboy gear during the 90s-2000s for CAS. I see a lot that are pretty junky, but the OP's looks nicer. I bought a gunbelt the other day used, from a recent maker I didn't know, but since he's in Arizona I had to try it. It's pretty nice, Cochise Leather by a David LaFlair. Still around, they have a site and make saddles too, a good sign.
Andy Anderson started out as a saddlemaker & look @ what he accomplished after he quit working for Arvo
 

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The rivet in the belt loop gives it away as modern…
 
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