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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an Anaconda in excellent mechanical condition, fired very little. However, the original owner didn't take great care with his guns. It was in the blue plastic box for a long time with no protection, and has quite a bit of light damage to the brush finish. I'm thinking about sending it back to Colt. They quoted $300 over the phone. Was wondering if anyone has had Colt refinish a brushed stainless revolver, and particularly how it affected the roll marks and stamps. I'm not sure if they blast these or do them by hand.

Thanks
 

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First, you may want to contact Colt again. Sometimes the phone people get things wrong, and due to the heavy calls they're getting, they've been making mistakes and giving out incorrect info sometimes lately.
The reason for calling is that I don't think it will cost $300 to just re-polish a satin finish Colt. Polishing to a mirror finish, yes, but the satin finish requires much less work, and $300 would be close to what they charge to totally re-blue a Colt Python to the Royal Blue bright polish.
Since your Anaconda doesn't need re-bluing, and doesn't need a Bright Polish, I suspect you may have been given incorrect pricing.

Colt does polishing by hand, which to be exact means they use large diameter, very thick HARD polishing wheels.
Bead blasting is done only on the top of the frame and barrel to reduce glare.

Since the satin Colt finish doesn't require as much polishing as a mirror finish does, unless the gun is pitted or has major damage around the stamps, there won't be much if any change to the stamps.
If there needs to be major metal removal, Colt can re-fresh the stamps to like new.
The up side is, the gun will come back looking like brand new. Plus, while they have it they'll totally clean and check it for any problems.

Just as general information, unless the damage is fairly deep and wide spread, you may be able to restore the finish yourself using Scotchbrite synthetic polishing pads.
These are similar to the green pot scrubber pads sold in grocery stores.
You can buy these in various "grits" at most automotive supply houses where they're sold for use in auto painting.
Buy several grits so you can match the original satin grain finish.

To use, use a pad that's near the original satin grained finish to rub the damaged areas.
Depending on how bad and how deep the damage, you can either completely polish the damage out, or at least blend it in so it's not so noticeable.
After the damage is corrected as well as possible, finish by "stroking" the pad in the same direction the original grained finish ran in that particular area.
Stroking the pad over the area will remove the tiny circular scratches left when you reverse the direction of the leaving only the original type grained surface.

Using this method you can restore a satin stainless guns finish to near factory level if the damage isn't too bad and you use the correct pads and technique.
If you want a true restoration, Colt would be the best, but again, I suspect you got incorrect pricing information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Doctor D

I thought about attempting it myself with the Scotchbrite pads. Although it is all superficial, there is enough that I would rather have Colt make it look like new again. I'll give them another call. Most importantly, I wanted to know that the stamps will not get messed up.

Thanks again,

Mark A.
 

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Save some time and money and use the ScotchBrite pads. Easy. I use the maroon pads and finish with the gray pads (7447).
You could use only the gray pads, it takes only a bit longer. I also use a little oil on the pad. You can get a near factory finish
without the hassle of shipping, etc.
 

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Thank DFW and Molleur! I was hoping you would chime in DFW as I have the same issue. And thank you Molleur for saying what specific pads you use and the numbers of them. The marks on mine are very superficial and minor and I no they can be easily taken out like that. It's still just nerve racking because even the satin finish is so good on an Anaconda you can barely see the grain marks in certain areas of the gun, and it makes you wonder if you can actually achieve that with just a scotchbrite.

Thought just popped into my head. Instead of trying to "buff" the marks out, one could just leave it be and go shoot the heck out of it, until it gets more wear, then down the road ship it off to Colt.:)
 

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If you go at the job yourself, and it does not suit, you still have Colt.

Wouldn't it be great to be neighbors with dfariswheel ? He gives out some of the most comprehensive info on Colt workings you will find,and, for free !
 
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