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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In terms of value and desirability, would you consider light turn lines on the cylinder of a Python a bad thing? Does anyone really worry about them when buying a revolver?

I have a near mint 1978 Python with a very, very light turn line...but I find myself shying away from working the action and enjoying the smooth results because I don't want the turn line to get any more defined! I know different folks will have different ideas on this topic but I'd like to hear some opinions and maybe give my mind a rest so I can enjoy the gun to it's full potential! (Although, I will never sell it or trade it, I probably wont ever shoot it either, LOL!)



 

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A properly timed Python or similar Colt DA will not create a ring on the cylinder when the action is worked.

Closing the cylinder the correct way will avoid creating a turn line on a Colt. The ring you are seeing is most likely from people being careless or ignorant when closing the cylinder and allowing it to drag along the bolt.
 

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The old Colt action as used on the Python doesn't leave a ring if the gun is in proper time and is closed carefully.
If you're a collector you'll either have this attention to detail or more then likely, you'll just never open the cylinder of a collectible.

With that said, in the Real World all revolvers will get the line just from normal use.
Not getting a slight line on a Colt requires a very near psychotic attention to prevent it.
Most people just enjoy the gun and have fun.
 

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In terms of value and desirability, would you consider light turn lines on the cylinder of a Python a bad thing? Does anyone really worry about them when buying a revolver?

I have a near mint 1978 Python with a very, very light turn line...but I find myself shying away from working the action and enjoying the smooth results because I don't want the turn line to get any more defined! I know different folks will have different ideas on this topic but I'd like to hear some opinions and maybe give my mind a rest so I can enjoy the gun to it's full potential! (Although, I will never sell it or trade it, I probably wont ever shoot it either, LOL!)



If this is true...(Although, I will never sell it or trade it, I probably wont ever shoot it either, LOL!) Then it really doesn't matter, enjoy your Colt, it was made to play with!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If this is true...(Although, I will never sell it or trade it, I probably wont ever shoot it either, LOL!) Then it really doesn't matter, enjoy your Colt, it was made to play with!
Haha, indeed! I was thinking that the bolt actually dragged on the cylinder when working the action but after close examination of the workings, I do see where closing the cylinder is the culprit! Thanks for the info guys!

It's true, I will never sell this Python but I do like my guns to look their best!
 

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I say sell it and get all the money for it then buy a nice shooter so you can actually enjoy it all the way not just clicking it on the couch. Take it out and watch it shoot and turn out what it's reputation has earned all these years. That's like having a Ferrari and never driving it. My question to you is who are you saving it for to enjoy the next guy who ends up with it? I have several and yes most of them are investments but I actually have 2 that I shoot. The rest are for college funds. I thought about leaving it to the boys and all I can think of is this little story I'm going to tell you which I experienced in a gun shop. I was at my local gun shop and along walked in a you gent holding a box of guns. He began to speak with the owner and next thing the box began to empty and out came the guns. Well let's just say they were some sweet guns. I asked the gent if he was getting out of the hobby and his reply was no it was his fathers and he had no interest in the guns and he could actually use the money. Well there were many guns that would have brought high end cash some in the original boxes and most new. The dealer purchased the guns for very short money. So the moral of this story is when leaving things behind after we leave this world and head to the Colt mfg. company in the sky, leaving things to loved ones is fine and a wonderful idea but if they don't know what your getting could be a problem. Since they are getting it for nothing any money they get for them upon selling then is a gain even if they get ripped off. This young gent got taken by the gun shop owner and to me that is sad. So what I say, sell before you leave this world and pass on the cash unless they are into guns and know what they are worth by making a list and keeping it current. At least the slips to what you paid for the guns.
 

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I have purchased several new Colts in the Early/mid 80's with turn lines unopened direct from the distributor. When fitters/inspectors tested for fit, function and test fired them etc., I'm sure "indexing" the cylinder wasn't a priority and wasn't concerned about turn lines then because they were production guns and knew the guns would be used and would get turn lines anyway. Collectors now may not want turn lines today but when a gun is in standard production (like Colt was when the Python and other revolvers were being made) and weren't just catered to the "collector" market or making all these revolvers for collector purposes, no one was concerned about turn lines back then.
 

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Rocketfoot,You have several options to prevent the turn line from getting worse I will only cover two of them.Sell the gun to me and I wont care about the turn line or tack weld the cylinder to the frame and then you wont have to worry about the turn line.:eek: D*
 

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Speaking of lines, you have to decide for yourself where you set the "AR" line. True collectors tend to set that line very high, and no doubt it is a function of personality. Others, like me, cannot enjoy simply owning a perfect in-box specimen. And it is once again a function of personality. I think you tend to be in one camp or the other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Let me tell you the story behind my Python...My folks bought it unfired but without box/papers from one of my Dad's coworkers. My Mom has since passed away and My Dad isn't doing to good these days but I plan on keeping the Python and my other Colts as sentimental pieces to be passed down to my two boys someday with the instructions to pass them down to their kids someday...so I'm actually between the 2 camps! I consider the Python a collector's gun but I see no reason to keep it unfired. I do have a King Cobra and an Anaconda that we shoot. I probably will shoot the Python someday but I'm just not in a hurry to do so! She's a safe queen right now. I was just curious about the opinions on turn lines from the Colt community.
 

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If you choose to reeeeeeealy never shoot it, then you need to take it out of the safe daily, caress it, smooch that virgin cylinder, polish the virgin stocks, clean off all of the fingerprints, wrap it in a silicone cloth and carefully replace it into its bed in the safe. Such a treasure should never be relegated to the darkness and loneliness of a safe forever.
 
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I sold a pristine Series 70 GCNH w/box to a serious collector friend awhile back. This guy is fussy. He knew one of the reasons I was selling it was that I just can't abide a collector-only gun. Somewhere in the conversation, I did mention that all I ever did was take it out of the safe maybe once a week, turn it over a couple of times and put it right back in the safe. His reaction: "You took it out that often?"
 

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Hey FOOT,checkout KMKColts' post above[#9].About 35 years ago I was lucky enough to buy Python # 447[ 3 rounds fired at Colts and six rounds fired by MR. XXX] from a very old gentleman at a gun show in B'ham, Al. I had wanted a 6" when I bought my 4" in Oakland ,Ca. on my way to Viet Nam.[No time to find a 6" before the troop ship sailed!]
The 6" # 447 was absolutely PRISTINE! The more I contemplated shooting it, the more I talked myself out of it. It's mint, it's too nice,it's bla, bla, bla. I sold the gun to a collector in 1985, having not shot it in about 18 or so years. Today, I wonder at my sanity ,or lack there of. In the 28 years since I sold the "blue beauty" without shooting it , I suffer every time I think of it. I don't remember what I paid or what I sold the gun for but, I'm damn sure kicking my own butt for not shooting it and keeping it. I probably made a thousand dollars or so profit on that deal but, I probably lost $10,000. worth of enjoyment! So,shoot the damn thing and enjoy it or sell it to someone that knows if he is a shooter or a collector.Trust me, you can really screw yourself out of a lot of enjoyment if you try hard enough! Nick
 

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Do turn lines matter? Does a Corvette or Model A Ford collector worry about "turn lines" on the clutch, or wear on the tires? Not a well adjusted collector. Only OCD, drooling speculator collectors. No, doesn't matter to me if a [gun, Leica, pocketwatch, Fender Amp, etc.] has a touch of wear, it will get more when I use it for what it was designed.
 
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