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I have a 38 cal Army Special With Wells Fargo Markings on the but. I also have a letter from colt Historian MS Huber telling me about the gun. I recently took this to a gun show and was offered 200.00 for it. I know its worth more than 200.00 but I thought I would check with the people that know Colts....... That being you guys on this forum. Could someone give me some sort of Value? Thanks
Rob
 

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Without seeing the gun,it is impossible to give even an approximate idea of its value(plus you did not state condition as far as the % of finish remaining,what type of finish,and the stocks,or grips).

I do know that any "express" or agency marked gun,especially those with a factory letter that authenticates this,is worth a premium over a non marked gun-and I know that your gun is worth more than $200,that I suspect so "wheeler-dealer" offered you. Few months ago,saw a Police Positive,that had very little finish,but was Am.Ex. marked(and verified) and dealer got his $275 asking price,which IMO, was "fair". Without the authententic roll markings,it was $100 gun!

I suspect you r Army Special,was used by the Wells Fargo Armored Car Service,on the west coast.The armored car services tended to retain there guns for a long time,they were shot very little,and tend to show a lot of finish wear from being unholstered/reholstered at every "stop" on their route.

An older cousin worked(briefly!) for Brinks in the late 50's. He was issued a 1920 vintage .32 Pol. Positive. Shotgun in the "truck" was an old "solid frame" Winchester 97!

Bud
 

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Thanks Lonewolf,

I would post a picture of it but I dont know how to. The gun is marked WF&Co on the but and according to the letter from colt it was shipped to Wells Fargo in Chicago Ill and there was 18 guns in the shipment and it was marks WF&Co at Colt Factory. I would say it has alot of blue left on it maybe 60%
 

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Army Specials seem to have appreciated in value by a higher percentage,than some other Colts the past 3-5 years. They are seen by some as the first "modern mid size frame Colt double action,swing out cylinder". Indeed,their basic action can be found on the Python today(once Colt starts making them again!). The older double actions,the 1889,1892 and other Navy / Army revolvers,the "left wheelers",have long been "neglected by collectors(think it was Guy who made that good point a while back)

With any Army Special,you know you have a pre war gun! One that is at least about 80 years old. The Official Police that followed it, was continued up to 1968,and while there were some changes,after 1945,these changes don't stand out to the novice.

A "few" years ago,Army Specials could be gotten cheaply,in average shape,because the feeling was that they were too old to fire with modern +P .38 Special ammo,compared to the Official Police(this same sentiment exists in some parts of the country with the S&W M&P;that pre wars and early post wars are "too common to be collector pieces",and that they are too weak for +P,which S&W verifies,using 1957 and later,as OK for the +P.)

An Army Special,in the shape you describe,will fetch between $250-300 here in N. New England-WITHOUT the Wells Fargo markings. So probably a minimum of $500,is what I'd ask for your gun without seeing/handling it.

Any extras like the box,and Wells Fargo marked holster/belt would really "shoot" the value up. A collector who specializes in agency marked pieces,would be the type most interested in your gun,especially where you have the factory letter verifying this. Hope this helps,and good luck.

Bud
 

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Thank You Bud. Now can you tell me how to post a pic of the gun. Thanks again Rob
 

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Thanks Bud for your insight. The Gun I have was my fathers and he has since passed so this will become a family heirloom if one of the kids dont sell it when my time comes. Anyway, I have always liked guns and I am just now starting to just collect. This site has been very helpful and I thank everyone who has shed some light for me. Thanks again Bud
Rob
 

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Robin; Aren't dealers at shows,just wonderful,like the one that offered you $250?? Yeah,I know,they gotta make a buck,but that wide a price difference is just plain insulting!!

When this old omega wolf is feeling especially mean,or gets a "complaint" from a friend about tis type of dealer,I will go to the next show that the dealer is at,with a nice vintage piece,dress as a complete nerd(fairly e-z for me!) and let the dealer offer me some wicked low price,then hem and haw about the gun being my dead great uncles,an heirloom etc. Get the dealer salivating,and almost when he thinks I'm about to accept the insulting price,walk away! Or,if I have an "audience",that put me up to this,quickly drop the "nerd" act and tell what the gun is and what its value is!! Cruel,but highly efficent!!

Sorry for the "rant"! Collector Firearms is a very high priced shop for basically two reasons, IMO. First,that website,is expensive(and I love it as a history teacher,to show some of their older weapons,when we are covering that time period.) They have a huge overhead,say versus a one man shop,operating out of a residence. Secondly,the Houston area is quite "affluent",with many "well financed collectors". So,don't think the $1250 is what you could get,even selling the gun directly to a collector,and bypassing a dealer. But maybe you could,to one who specializes in "agency roll marked guns".

Looks like the grips(stocks)on your gun are stags,either real,or plastic. The grips on the gun on Collectors,are not what is usually found on Army Specials. The grips on that gun are from the earlier(pre 1908) "left wheeler" Colt Army/Navy Double actions.)only differnce between the civilian Army and Navy models were the grips;the "Navy" had the Colt logo as shown on Collectors website,the "Army",Colt name and pony and usually a date,like 1892.

The Army Specials had the same stocks of fragile hard black rubber,but with a stylized "C" on their sides. This Army Special shown on Collectors COULD have been a very early one,that used some of the left over earlier grips.(conversely,some of the last Army Specials used the checkered Walnut stocks that are usually associated with the post 1926 Official Police,but Colt was never one to "throw away good parts",and there are "transition periods" between what are listed as production change overs.

So,probably the original grips on your gun got broke(hope a guard didn't drop it while taking money to/from a bank etc.-but its been known to happen!!). Original grips sometimes will show up on eBay,or at a larger gun show!

A great piece of history,and glad you didn't sell it!!!! Wonder if the original holsters and Sam Brown belts are still around for those "armoyred car guns"??

Bud
 

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Something smells bad.First you want to know the value,then you say you are glad you didn't sell it for $250,then you claim it was your dad's gun and a family heirloom.I'm completely confused.I hope YOU luck in your decision.modoc
Oh by the way,those grips are plastic for sure.m
 

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Nothing Funny or smelly here just needed the info so I can Insure it. Thanks
Rob /forums/images/graemlins/ooo.gif
 
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