Colt Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What's the best way orient the barrel link when reassembling the slide and frame? I've watched a bunch of videos and don't understand if the link should point forward against the return spring rod or should be vertical. If it's vertical, do you leave the slide upside down and slide the frame onto it? Do you then turn it right side up and move the slide back and forth a bit to allow the link to drop into the vertical position? Any good video you suggest? Any suggestion will be helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
What ever is easier for you and your gun. Some trial and error isn't going to hurt anything. As long as you get the slide release through the barrel link it doesn't really matter how to get to that point.

Some times a tooth pick, punch, chop stick or something similar can help get everything aligned.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,892 Posts
I never thought about a toothpick, I just get it lined up the best way I can. Have I missed and put it together only to come apart. Practice makes perfect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,218 Posts
I have an easier time if the muzzle is up and the link is tipped to the rear, but there's no "wrong" way to do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,851 Posts
When I get a new 1911 pistol, I always take it apart for cleaning and lubing my way. As to the link, I want it to begin moving by gravity with some light oil between the Link and the Barrel. This usually means a very fine light sanding where the connection is made. When I reassemble the Barrel I rotate the Link forward, slide it in, and let it fall verticle for replacing the Pin. When I was in the Army, I did not have to worry about the Link being tight, it was a WWII Remington Rand that had some wear to it, LOL! I could also field strip and reassemble my Remington Rand blind folded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,950 Posts
IIRC from my armorers training the link is supposed to be forward resting on the barrel. Now that was the military way.
There is a ridge inside the recoil spring plunger tunnel and I believe the link will hit that if standing up or leaning back. This doesn't seem to be so will all pistols though.
Generally reassembled upside down.
The NRA Firearm Disassemble guide had, or use to have the proper or recommended method for disassembly and reassembly.

Go to the M1911A1.org site and look at their web pages. All kinds of good info there, not that their isn't excellent info here its just that they probably have a description of what you are looking for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,980 Posts
Welcome to the forum. Understandably I suppose, considering the city's gun laws, we do not have a large contingent of forum members from within the big city, (or they only put "New York").

The "old way" Of reassembly ;( Old being "pre-80" ignition system) was mostly taught as : slide up-side down and frame slid onto it,...and you only had to have a little "bump" to get over the disconnector.
Now though, the series 80 frame, (as yours), when turned up-side down allows the plunger lever to rotate out of the frame just enough to stop the frame from going on fully.
So,...when you think you just need a stronger "bump" to get over the disco, with juusst a little stronger hit :D, you are actually bending / breaking the plunger lever, AND putting an ugly mark on the rear of your slide.

Turn your assembled frame up-side down and with a little shake you will see the plunger lever obey Sir Issac Newton and drop downward... No despair in the frame downward assembly, just nudge the plunger lever back into the frame until that portion of the frame is within the slide.

I still mostly assemble the up-side down way, just in order to keep an eye on the barrel link position, which was your main question. The link is positioned correctly when it nestles into the slight opening of the recoil spring guide.
If you look at your slide loosely assembled, you can see a machined area of the barrel legs are contoured "half-round", which matches the contour not only of the round portion of the link, but also the round contour of your slide lock shaft/pin.

A tip on knowing your slide lock pin is correctly in the link,.. before complete assemble and finding out it isn't,... is to assemble only to the point of having the slide lock inserted but not yet in place. Let it dangle loosely and grab the tip of the barrel and tug back and forth.

If there is no movement, (of the barrel), then you have the slide lock pin in the link and you can proceed with full assembly.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top