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Since my wife found her perfect concealed ( Ruger LCR snub 327 magnum) revolver, we go 2X's/week to our range. Like with my 357 in magnum revolvers there are different loads to chose from, she has 32 H&R, .32 S&W, .32 S&W Long plus the 327 in mag ammo. We can easily do 3-4 boxes of 32 S&W long Privi Partizan 98 grain practice ammo & her SD is 32 H&R Hornady 80 grain Critical Defense. I pay under $19 /box for SD carry & 50 & pay under $13/box of 50
for practice ammo. My carry is the King Cobra revolver 3" long & use 38 sp. Magteck for practice & Hornady 357 for SD. Those are a tad more costly.

Are there 1 or 2 step reloading systems that I can roll my own? Truthfully I;m scared. At 70 yrs. young my hands sren't as steady as a young man hands are.

As always, All responsed to my post are welcome

Shoot Well & be Accurate
 

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Ehhhh, I started with a LEE Loader, a cheap, (well under $10.00 at the time) set-up, it was a die, punch, rod, powder dipper, and combination bullet and primer seater. Just add components and a mallet! Not exactly ideal particularly for pistol, but it did the job. Aside from components you would need a manual, press, dies for each caliber, powder measure, loading block to hold cases, a scale to check weights, and a caliper. That's about the minimum. Most pistol/revolver dies are a 3 die set and LEE brand are the least expensive and include the shell holder and a powder dipper should you choose to use it, plus their expander die can use the LEE Auto disc powder measure, (and others) and charge the case while it bells the mouth, and it's an excellent measure to boot, it's all I use for handgun charges, (mine is the Auto Disc Pro). Any single stage press will work, electronic scales have come down in price to very affordable now, the Auto Disc is very reliable and repeatable for small charges, but I always check with a scale anyway, (they include several charging discs and a chart).

It's a simple process, clean the cases a bit, set the sizing/decapping die, (for most handgun they will be carbide, no messy lube required, run the ram and shell holder up all he way and screw the die in just to kiss the shell holder and lock in place). Expanding die is a little more, run it in and try a case until it flairs the mouth just enough to start a bullet. It's some trial and error, but once set it's set. I get an optional LEE factory crimp die so the seater die is just that a seater die only and I crimp on the separate die although it can be done on the seater die. Most press's will come with a primer seat tool, although I use an off press tool myself.

Size/decap-prime-flair-charge-seat bullet to correct length over all-crimp-shoot-repeat. Check out a few you tube vids using a single stage press and decide if it's for you. LEE stuff is inexpensive, but most things they sell work well. I use their Auto Disc Pro for handgun cartridges and will not use any thing else, it's simply the best and most repeatable measure on the market. I have several single stage press's, but for handgun I use a Hornady LNL-AP progressive with LEE dies. I prime off press, add case and bullet, pull handle, repeat and a loaded cartridge drops out with each pull of the handle. I suggest starting out with a single stage though, learn the basics before going for volume. A reloading manual such as Hornady's should be your first purchase, excellent graphics and easy to comprehend.
 

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Nothing to be scared of, but a healthy dose of caution is in order. Reloading is fairly simple and safe as long as you are focused and paying attention.

I suggest getting a good up-to-date reloading manual and reading the "How to" section until you understand the steps. Hornady, Speer, Sierra, Lyman and several others have excellent manuals. Something else is find someone who already reloads and get them to show you and walk you through the steps. Reading the book and looking at pictures is good but watching and being able to ask questions is invaluable. The big thing here is do not experiment, follow the manual's advice!

I can't agree more with krag96's suggestion about starting with a single stage press! There are several companies who market kits that include everything you need (except dies) to get started. RCBS, Hornady, Lyman and Lee come to mind. Most also have toll-free help lines and good websites if you have problems. You can add peripherals as you gain experience and see a need.
 

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I've reloaded for years. But in most calibers, you can buy ammo about as cheap as buying all the components to reload. So there really isn't an economic advantage. That's not counting all the cost of buying a press, dies, luber, loading blocks, and all. Or your time to learn how, and then do it. I'd spend that time finding the cheapest source for practice ammo, and just buy it.
 

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I will add that as far as customer service goes, it would be hard to beat RCBS. They're simply outstanding to deal with. I called them once to get parts for a priming tool that I lost and told them I would pay since it was my fault I lost the parts, nope, they insisted on sending them free of charge.

Mark's suggestion of finding someone who reloads and watching the process is also a good suggestion. No matter what brand you start with, no worries, as dies and shell holders are universal as to press. I have a mix of RCBS, Hornady, LEE, Redding, Lyman, and some I never heard of and they all work in harmony together.
 

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Reloading may not pay for itself, if you only use virgin cases. If you save your cases, reloading will be cheaper.
1) To start with, only load from start load to mid-range.
2) Until confident, weigh each charge
3) Always, always, always, inspect the charged case ID for powder height and be sure every case has powder up to the same approximate height before putting a bullet on it. Where reloading becomes unsafe is when forgetting this step.
4) You can use a Lee Loader (https://leeprecision.com/reloading-kits/lee-loader-pistol/) but it is slow and takes work. You can also get a Lee Breech Lock Reloader Press for $39 or even a Lee Reloading Breech Lock Challenger press for $85. A set of dies (with shell holder), some Lee Breech Lock Bushings ($10/2 bushings), and components and you're on your way to a much more fun endeavor then the Lee Loader.
5) Start with jacketed bullets, I prefer to buy Precision Delta in bulk or Zero jacketed bullets in bulk from Powder Valley). These will cost about the same as plated and perform so much better.
 

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I just finally got back in to Loading / re-Loading recently and I am really enjoying it.

I use a Lyman "All American" four Hole Turret Press.

It would have to be called "slow" compared to a Progressive Press.

Assuming clean, ready to go cases, then...

I de-Prime ( I never re size for Hand Gun Cartridges, or at least not for any of the ones I have ever used ), bell or flare case Mouth a teeeny bit, Seat a Primer...arrange fifty such in a Loading Block so I can see into them...each gets it's Powder Charge from a Powder dispenser...all get a good look over to ensure everyone's Powder is to the right level...set and partially insert the Bullet, Seat the Bullet, then, crimp the Case.

This also requires of course that the Dies needing it, have been adjusted to be at the right depth.

Have not timed myself, but when I was using the smaller Lyman "Tru-Line Junior" Press, a "Box of Fifty" .45 Colt or .38 Special, start to finish, took me a little under an Hour, maybe 45 minutes if I was in the groove nicely.

A Progressive Press, like the "Dillon Square Deal" presses, a "Box of Fifty" probably takes like eight minutes or something...maybe less.

I bought a brand new Dillon Square Deal Press in the latter 1980s, and it was a joy, and I loaded many thousands of rounds with it...it did not take any more time to set up than a Turret Press would, but once set up, it cranked out finished rounds like Popcorn. I was attentive, and careful and I had reliably fine results every time.

If one plans on shooting a lot, then a good Progressive Press makes the most sense I think.

If one wants to savor the experience of the numerous successive operations required of a Single Stage Press, or Turret Press, then many examples of these of course are out there, new or used.

If one decides loading / re-loading sounds nice but maybe not right now, buying ammo by the Case, especially when big Internet Retailers are having a Sale, "Free Shipping" and or "Proo Code" to Boot, can be a very nice way to go also!
 

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I've reloaded for years. But in most calibers, you can buy ammo about as cheap as buying all the components to reload. So there really isn't an economic advantage. That's not counting all the cost of buying a press, dies, luber, loading blocks, and all. Or your time to learn how, and then do it. I'd spend that time finding the cheapest source for practice ammo, and just buy it.

For 9mm, 40 SW, 45ACP, you can buy ammo cheaper. Once you go above the 4x, 41, 44, 45C, etc. reloading pays for itself quickly.

The other benefit is I loaded my wife some mild 38's that made her alloy J frame much more enjoyable for her to shoot.

I use a Dillon 550, I don't lube straight wall brass, nor loading blocks. I save peanut butter containers for my loaded rounds. Old coffee containers for cleaned brass waiting to be loaded. Cat litter buckets full of free range brass waiting to be reloaded.

Reloaders may not save money, but they can shoot more.
 

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Doc reloading is a great part of the hobby. I will offer a slightly different suggestion on starting. Get the Lee Turret press set up, you can set it up as a single stage and later use the auto advance part. The changeable turrets are nice too. I should have kept mine when I got my 550.

Oh, and again, read some good manuals!
 

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Doc, I’m 82 and still shoot and reload so I wouldn’t let age stop me. I think that reloading is a hobby separate from shooting in a way. Experimenting with various loads, powder types and bullets is very enjoyable in itself. Reading a variety of manuals is good advice plus they are informative and as fun to read as a good book.
I started out with a single stage press and then switched to a progressive press and then back to a single stage press when I discovered that I enjoyed the reloading process more than I liked speed. If you decide to go the reloading route the best of luck with your new hobby. Joseph
 

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I don't know about the prices of ammo currently, but at 7-8 cents for the bullet, 3 cents for the primer, say 1 cent for the powder, and nothing for the case (since you should have saved the ones you shot), it would seem hard to beat 12 cents per round for 9mm. Of course, you might be able to match that if you buy in bulk and shoot very cheap steel cased ammo, but the results you can get from reloading are so much better.
 

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My advice to any newbie reloading is measure every charge and take your time. Don't make it a speed game. A lot of people go for production, but I still prefer the old school one at a time method when it comes to powder.
 

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I agree with everyone. And will only add, reloading is fun and addictive. However, don't do it to save money. In the long run, most times, reloading costs exceed what you would pay for plinking ammo from the store. I warn ya, if you reload, you will soon be up to your eyeballs in supplies and equipment.
 

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I am also an active member on a forum called The High Road. Guys there also have a lot off knowledge about loading. This link will answer some of your questions, and hopefully lead to more questions.

I enjoy loading for odd calibers. There is a lot of satisfaction in turning out a good load. My favorite is for the .32-20.
 

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Biggest and most reasonable reason to reload/handload is you can make better ammo for YOUR gun. Off the shelf ammo has to fit every gun ever chambered for that cartridge making it okie dokie in some guns , excellent in a few and downright crap in a lot of them especially with cast lead.Very few cartridges are consistent in their dimensions throughout their history for factory ammo to be as accurate as the guns potential with a little information and a properly configured cartridge for YOUR gun
 

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200 rounds a week / 10,000 rounds a year can pay for the reloading equipment pretty quick. Plus it's fun. Starline brass is around $125 for 500 pieces shipped and will last a lifetime. I like to spend a couple days loading it all and then having it to shoot rather than buying a 100 rounds and then reloading every week. I shoot mostly lead bullets (~500 for $50) at about 1000 fps or same as the 32 H&R for practice. Age has nothing to do with it. Just be meticulous.
 

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I don't know how I missed this one first time around, but it got by me.
There are any number of quality reloading setups that won't break the bank. My equipment is what I have collected and made to work since the early '70s. It is a straightforward process, and you can find good resource material in every gun shop. You never have to be in a hurry. It is a heads-up deal, and you have to take the safety precautions seriously.
I would suggest a decent single stage setup that you have no choice but to be deliberate and complete with each stage.
You will find it to be enjoyable, and your hand loaded rounds will perform as good as or better than factory ammo.
You will be able to assemble your rounds to the best handling and most accurate performance for each of your guns.
You are gonna love it.
 

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I agree with everyone. ... I warn ya, if you reload, you will soon be up to your eyeballs in supplies and equipment.
Yelp, what he said! I've posted this pic before but it sure is aligned with Grandpawj's statement.
Reloading Rm 1-19.jpg
 
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