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Become one with the gun by shooting thousands of rounds. A two handed grip helps me a lot, off hand stabilizing and helping the dominant hand hold the gun on target through the cylinder. You’ve got a great start there,

I can guarantee you’d get 3 out 6 in center of mass based on your targets and that’s better than some can boast of.in my experience.

I agree with others on the revolver, I prefer a Smith & Wesson K-38 or magnum model but your python should do the trick just as well.
 

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i see a lot of good advice in these posts.
To piggyback on to what Ollie said, because no need to waste money in ammo...
I saw a YouTube video that was linked from the forum some time ago And it was how to improve your handgun skills. the Shooter is using a semi aunto pistol , but same principle . the guy is a professional shooter. So he first recommended eliminating the problem of what Ollie was talking about also. If you pull the trigger with no ammo and your not staying on target.. well there ya go. Its a no-go. Practice pulling the trigger dry fire and staying on target. Step one. Then live ammo staying on target. Anticipating recoil is Sometimes a problem for folks that even shoot a lot. exactly what Ollie said, what a shooter does when he pulls the trigger on a empty chamber tells the tale of what he’s ( and she’s) doing when the gun really does go bang.
I have good days and bad days. I don’t shoot enough and sometimes I‘m on it , zoned in and solid, sometimes I believe I did the cha cha as I pulled the trigger. :)
 

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I’m not a very good shot with a revolver even though I love them. I recently got a 4.25 inch 2020 python and I want to learn how to shoot it well. Does anyone have any tips on how to become a better revolver shooter. These are some groups I fired. I believe I have the sights on fairly well but I was wondering if anyone had any tips on what to work on to become a better shot. I was also wondering if anyone recommends the python elite type grips altamont sells. They look very comfortable and may help me shoot a tiny bit better. The first 2 groups are .357 from 25 yards single action rested and the smaller one is .38 special single action rested from 25 yards. View attachment 701886 View attachment 701887 View attachment 701888
I do notice some stringing in your groups (groups that are mostly on the narrow side, but tall.) When resting make sure you are resting comfortably. Don't force the rest, adjust the rest to accommodate you. Also, rest the barrel, not your wrists or the butt. Get on target and squeeze the trigger. Get in the "zone" where you focus on only moving that trigger finger, and gently at that. Make sure you hang onto the revolver like a firm handshake. Use the most uniform pressure you can time after time. When you start to feel fatigued, either eye or physical, it's time to hang it up for a few hours. The stock grips in my opinion are quite nice. Something many people don't know, if you have problems with shot to shot gripping uniformity, finger-groove grips will amplify that problem.
 

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In the 50’s, Colts match 38 revolvers (6” barrel) has to shoot 1 1/8” ( or 1 1/4”) or better at 15 yards with a 5 shot group and match ammo from a rest single action. So that might be about 2” at 25. This easily translates into hitting 12” plates at 100 yards if you want to do that. The shooter needs to determine what kind of shooting sport you want to do. Obviously this is more than accurate enough for practical defensive pistol shooting at 21 feet ( 7 yards). Drawing from a holster and timed fire is another discipline. I like all forms of pistol shooting.
 
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