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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I presently use Mil-tech TW25b and like it, but know zip about greases, I've always used oil - Weapon Shield is my oil and seems to stay put well, though not as protective as grease. I bought my first Sig, all steel, and Sig recommends in an all steel pistol you lube the slide-rails and use the TW25b - then use what you want on the rest of gun's lube areas. They even enclose in the case a small sample of it -

I know a vet well, works at my Range, fought in Irag. He tells me in Army tests of greases TW25b came out last. Guy is very reliable and quite knowledgeable so I tend to give this weight.

So, a little confusing, that info with what Sig wants.

The TW25b's directions are to use just a tiny amount; it's white. If you can see white it's too thick. So a very thin coating and it is not messy at all, unlike many greases, it appears very minimal on the gun to begin with. And I've never had a stoppage in my first 400 rounds, course that could be the Sig 220 - great gun.

Anyway, thought I'd try another just to compare. Any recomendation that is acknowledged to be at the top for greases? The vet said Hoppe's was top choice of Army, but it looks from the package that is made specifically for long-term storage, not a shooting grease.

Thanks
 

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The Marines use TW-25B on their M2 Brownings and their automatic grenade launchers. The stuff bonds to the metal surface. It has passed a 500 hour salt spray test with zero corrosion. I've been using it on slide rails and locking lugs for about 10 years now with zero problems. It stopped galling between the frame and slide on an AMT Hardballer that was ready for the junk bin. It's also available as an oil. I think you've made a good choice.

Buck
 

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I use TS-70 moly on all my guns on the metal to metal contact moving parts. www.ts-moly.com I use the moly past or anti seeze because it has a higher percentage of moly in it. Just a little will do.
 

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There was a great link to a lubricant test posted a couple months ago. Personally on rails and barrels I use oil. On barrel links I use grease. On internals of revolvers I use grease. Anywhere there is a need to protect against surface to surface pressure, and for those areas that are not cleaned on a regular basis.

Years ago I purchased a small jar of Rig +P stainless steel lube/grease. I use it for those surfaces mentioned above. It looks and smells just like those little grease pots with the yellow lids that were used on M-14's.

My .02 is I will never subject my firearms to the kind of torture the military does therefore I don't pay attention to what they are currently using. Their needs and mine are different. Typically after a day at the range the slides come off my semi autos and the dirty oil is cleaned up and replaced before the next time I shoot them. Revolvers usually get wiped down and put away.

Bottom line is most all the products out there for sale are good. Use what makes you feel comfortable and don't concern yourself with what the military is using. As always JMHO.
 

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Like oils, there are no "Miracle" greases.
Just about any heat and water resistant thick grease will work as well as any other in firearms.

Among the better greases is ordinary Lithium grease as used by the military on the M1 rifle. You can buy it cheap at any hardware store, farm supply store, or Walmart.
Brownell's sell mil-spec Lithium Lubriplate 120 grease.
Lithium is still one of the most effective greases.

For no other reason then that it worked so well in customer and my own guns, I used Super Lube grease and oil.
This is a clear-white synthetic Teflon-bearing lubricant that's good from -45 to +450.
The oil is a thick oil/thin grease consistency, with the grease being a stiff grease.
Both lubricate very well and stay where put. I used the oil on internals with the grease on auto slide and frame rails and barrels and on revolver hammer and trigger interfaces.

I've opened up pistols for maintenance as much as 10 years later and the Super Lube oil and grease was still present and working.
This is important in defense guns that get carried a lot and from which all too many lubricants dry out, evaporate, sling off, creep off, or wick out leaving the gun without a working lubricant.
Some gun lubricants can "go away" in as little as a few weeks.

You can buy small oilers and tubes of Super Lube from Midway, or buy it in bulk from Synco.
They also make an interesting spray grease. It comes out of the can in a spray then the carrier almost instantly evaporates leaving a coat of grease slightly thicker then the Super Lube oil, but not as thick as the grease.

Grease | Oil | Synthetic Lubricants
 

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Google "Gunbutter". 'Been using for years after a friend gave me some. My pistols love it and it stays on a long time.
 

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I've had good luck with Tetra grease and Gunslick.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The Marines use TW-25B on their M2 Brownings and their automatic grenade launchers. The stuff bonds to the metal surface. It has passed a 500 hour salt spray test with zero corrosion. I've been using it on slide rails and locking lugs for about 10 years now with zero problems. It stopped galling between the frame and slide on an AMT Hardballer that was ready for the junk bin. It's also available as an oil. I think you've made a good choice.

Buck
That's good to hear. The vet could be wrong after all.
 

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My grandfather used G-96 on everything he owned for years and never had a problem with metal wear or rust. I use it sparingly on different things, but I use wilson combat oil and grease on most parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
From op:

Thanks everybody, as I suspected there are many good products suggested but not you all in one combined yell screaming:
"USE HAMBURGER GREASE! DON'T BE A FOOL!"

Liked one poster said we are not the military so what is good for them is good for them, no more. And the Vet sounds wrong if the Marines use it, no fools there.

I also have a theory, akin to one poster's comments, that lubing is important but what you choose secondary to that the gun is cleaned each time you shoot. I used to do that, then backed off, though not for months or anything. With the new Sig, it's been each time I shoot, it's a pain now since it's new, it's an SD-gun, and I have to shoot it a lot in the beginning to learn it well, and learn ME well with the gun. But after that initial phase I won't need to shoot as frequently (been 3x a week! and lots of .45acp dollars - but in SD you gotta know you're using real well).

I'll probably stick to the TW25b - aside from the Vet's comment, Sig recommends it and they are not a flunky company and it feels good on the gun when I shoot it. Slide seems as fast as with oil. Plus, Customer Rep said it's fine if you want to use a drop of oil on the rails also, after you grease, immediately after or after shooting a long time in one range session.
 

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gvf,

Let me tell you a little war story about how I first found TW-25B grease, and it had nothing to do with guns. I worked for Owens-Corning Fiberglas where we manufactured packages of textile fiberglass. Large strands of glass fibers were wound onto cylindrical packages by a barrel cam. A barrel cam is a cylinder with spiral grooves in its surface, and it had a follower that ran back and forth in the grooves which distributed the fiberglass strand onto the package. All this equipment was expensive, and increased loads on the follower caused both it and the cam to wear. We were constantly evaluating lubricants to find better ones. We had a research apparatus that mimicked the process, and it allowed us to apply higher and higher loads to the cam resulting in the cam eventually stalling out. Most common greases would take up to 15 or 20 pounds before they failed. Even Lithium and Teflon greases could only make 30-40 pounds on this test. We tested TW-25B with this device and it reached the limit of the machine (150 pounds) without ever stalling out. From that point on, TW-25B was what I used on my semauto slide rails and locking lugs. OC continues to use it in its processes to this day.

Buck
 

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I've used white lithium grease on the rails and linkage of my 1911s and think it works pretty well. Of course, my guns have been stored in a clean environment before I shoot them, I clean the guns after every shooting session, and it's an exceptional session that I shoot more than 150 cartridges through any gun (a typical range session is more like 60 to 120 per gun). So my needs and the conditions I shoot my guns in are a lot different than a soldier's might be.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
gvf,

Let me tell you a little war story about how I first found TW-25B grease, and it had nothing to do with guns. I worked for Owens-Corning Fiberglas where we manufactured packages of textile fiberglass. Large strands of glass fibers were wound onto cylindrical packages by a barrel cam. A barrel cam is a cylinder with spiral grooves in its surface, and it had a follower that ran back and forth in the grooves which distributed the fiberglass strand onto the package. All this equipment was expensive, and increased loads on the follower caused both it and the cam to wear. We were constantly evaluating lubricants to find better ones. We had a research apparatus that mimicked the process, and it allowed us to apply higher and higher loads to the cam resulting in the cam eventually stalling out. Most common greases would take up to 15 or 20 pounds before they failed. Even Lithium and Teflon greases could only make 30-40 pounds on this test. We tested TW-25B with this device and it reached the limit of the machine (150 pounds) without ever stalling out. From that point on, TW-25B was what I used on my semauto slide rails and locking lugs. OC continues to use it in its processes to this day.

Buck

Great news! Thanks, couldn't have heard anything more reassuring.
 

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Moly is also an extreme pressure lube too.

moly;

eliminates all wear
reduces friction
prevents galling
does not attract dirt
stays where we put it even durinmg long term storage your gun is ready to rock n roll at anytime
Fights corrosion

You need to burnish moly into the small pores of the metal either by operating it by hand or with a soft rag. Then add a tad more moly and assembly it and operate it by hand till it frees up. It will seem tight at first and if it doesn't loosen up you have too much moly in it.
 
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