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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure the answer is to send it to colt, however they aren't even MAYBE taking orders until January (if someone here has an in there I would love a referal"-) Anyhow, this gun wasn't used much and somehow the finish got buggered up. any ideas, companies that have a forum thumbs up. I awill admit my ocd gets the best of me some times.
 

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If you have the time and the patience you can do it yourself. Lightly, slowly and gently sand it with sandpaper or 3M pads( they make sanding pads of various grit). Do not use steelwool as the fibers can be left behind and then leave a rust spot! I have taken a brushed stainless finish and polished it to bright stainless just to see if I could do it. Pics of before during and after are in the Lounge section. First time I ever polished metal so that should be proof that if I can do it anyone can!

flanman
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What grit, will it lower the value? I kind of want the satin factory finish back. The gun would seriously pass for unfired, I would bet this gun hasnt seen 20 rds. Ive never heard a more solid sound on any of my revolvers like the sound this particular colt makes, It is the difference between closing the door on a 2006 taurus and a 2013 Mercedes. I can't imagine how it got like this, but it will be my pleasure to bring it back.
 

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Value? If you do an undetectable job it won't affect value. On eBay you can find 3M polishing paper that goes a lot finer than wet or dry paper. On one I did, to remove a name engraved on the side of the barrel, it was lightly engraved by a jewelry store pantograph engraver, I carefully filed it down to level and blended in the curvature. With maybe 400 wet or dry, removed the file marks & with succeeding finer papers finished it to look original. It was important in this case that there was a 'direction' & 'fine-ness' to the original finish which I duplicated.

The job was for LGS, a new gun someone presented to a person who was anti-gun & refused it, brought back to the shop. LGS owner was ecstatic with undetectable removal, saying it could pass for new but he would offer it as a used gun.

From your questions it seems hazardous to use your gun to learn on unless you do a lot of dry-run experimentation to build up a skill. In my example above, I already had quite lot of experience in prep for finishing. Even so, I did a dry run on scrap before attacking the job.
 

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Get out your Flitz polish and microfiber cloth, and start hand polishing. It will shine up nicely.
 

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It all depends on how deep the scratches are. If not bad, you may get away with light polishing in one direction with fine scotch brite pads, the non scratching teal coloured ones. But if it is bad at all, you might need to use the fine green pads then the teal ones. You may get it TOO shiny though with the teal ones! But if you do, it shold settle down to about factory looks after it sits for a few months.
 

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For very fine grit sand cloth and a selection of Scotchbrite pads, an automotive supply house is best.
They sell fine wet or dry sand cloth and Scotchbrite pads for use in auto painting.
Hardware store wet or dry sanding cloth is usually too coarse unless they carry something in the very fine ranges.

If you need to use sand cloth use a sanding block made from a larger rubber eraser to prevent rounding off edges and corners.
Use the very finest cloth possible to get the scratches off, then restore the original grain with Scotchbrite pads.
Buy a selection so you can match the original satin finish.

Do the bar minimum sanding possible, because it's tough to maintain true surfaces without rounding edges or leaving ripples in flats.
To finish, "Stroke" a Scotchbrite pad in the direction the original satin grain runs.
By stroking the pad you avoid leaving tiny circular scratches where you reverse the direction of the pad.

Be careful to keep sanding dust and Scotchbrite particles from getting into the gun and wipe it off carefully when done.

This is the more or less approved method of resurfacing a stainless firearm short of a trip back to the factory.
 
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