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Discussion Starter #1
On the revolvers with a rebound lever should the bolt drop completely from sight in the frame during cylinder rotation, or just enough to "free" the cylinder?

Jeff
 

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bolt may not go completly {under}. more important is instant drop and correct re-entry at the right spot on leads.rebounds should be fit by experienced revolversmith. might i ask the symptom and has someone already worked on it?? /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The revolver is a 3rd issue DS that I purchased used. I'm unable to say if anyone has been inside it. However, here is how I see the action work. The bolt begins to drop simultaneously with the pull of the trigger. It just barely clears the cylinder before the cylinder begins to rotate. During rotation, the bolt continues to drop to the point of almost disappearing inside the frame until it pops up in the middle of the cylinder stop lead-in and then drops in the stop at the moment the hammer falls.

I am new to Colt DA revolvers and was just wondering if this was normal for this type of gun.

Jeff
 

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sounds like everything is working as it should, slow single action cock the EMPTY gun. if the bolt locks the cyl at or near full cock you are in business.still if it`s your first revolver you might have a friend who knows something about them give it a good look over before you test fire it.be advised that gun may not be designed or rated for +p or +p+ ammo. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
 

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Here's my instructions on how to check Colt timing:

To check Colt timing:

BOLT RETRACTION AND "SNAP BACK".
Open the cylinder and look at the small "lug" in the bottom of the cylinder window. This is the cylinder locking bolt.

Cock the hammer, and watch as the bolt retracts into the frame and pops back out.

The bolt MUST begin to retract THE INSTANT the hammer begins to move.
There MUST be NO (ZERO) hammer movement possible before the bolt starts to retract.

The bolt should retract smoothly with no hesitation until it's fully retracted, then it MUST pop back out with a clean "snap".
There should be no hesitation, and no amount of "creeping" back out.

CYLINDER UNLOCKING.
Close the cylinder.
Use your left thumb or fore finger to again cock the hammer, closely watching the cylinder bolt as you SLOWLY cock the hammer.

As the hammer comes back, the bolt will retract away from the cylinder.

The bolt MUST retract far enough to unlock the cylinder BEFORE the cylinder begins to rotate.

If the bolt is still slightly engaged with the cylinder lock notch, the cylinder will be attempting to turn while still partially locked.

This produces a "catch" or "hard spot" in the trigger pull and will damage both the bolt and the cylinder lock notches.
This often appears as metal "pulled out" of the lock notches, with rounded off and burred notches.

BOLT DROP TIMING.
Continue to cock the hammer, laying your right index finger on the cylinder just enough to prevent "free wheeling".

Watch for the bolt to drop back onto the cylinder. WHERE the bolt drops is CRITICAL.

The bolt MUST drop onto the lead or ramp in front of the actual cylinder notch.
If the bolt drops too soon, (in front of the notch ramp), it will mar the finish of the cylinder.

The bolt SHOULD drop into the MIDDLE 1/3rd section of the ramp.

If the bolt drops late, (farther toward the actual locking notch) the revolver may display "cylinder throw-by".
In this condition, during double action shooting the cylinder may rotate PAST the locking notch, and fire in an unlocked condition.

It's the nature of the Colt action, that a hesitant or jerky trigger pull by the user can induce throw-by in even a properly tuned Colt.
The Colt trigger should be pulled with a smooth, even pull, with no sudden jerks at the beginning.

CYLINDER LOCKUP.
Continue to pull the hammer back and both watch and listen for the bolt to drop into the cylinder lock notch.

The bolt MUST drop into the actual lock notch BEFORE the hammer reaches full cock.

The most common Colt mis-time situation is the hammer cocks before the bolt drops into the lock notch. (Hammer is cocked, but cylinder isn't locked).

In this condition, with the hammer fully cocked, you can push the cylinder slightly, and you will hear the "CLICK" as the bolt drops into lock.

In my experience, most Colt's leave the factory with the bolt dropping a little late into the lead, but usually wear in to correct timing.

If the bolt drops onto the cylinder early, no real problem, but there will be extra finish wear.

If the bolt drops late (closer to the lock notch) the cylinder may "throw by" or rotate TOO far in double action and this can cause off-center primer hits and firing while unlocked.

Each of these checks should be done on EACH chamber. All of these checks are better done individually. In other words, do the bolt retraction check on all six chambers, then do the bolt drop test, and so on.

A properly tuned Colt will:
Have a smoothly functioning bolt with no sticky or hesitant movement.

Unlock before the cylinder begins to turn.

The bolt will drop onto the middle 1/3rd of the ramp.

The bolt will drop into the lock notch before the hammer reaches full cock.

Have a smooth trigger pull, which does "stack".
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks icdux1 and dfariswheel for all the information. According to dfairswheel’s instruction my gun is in perfect time.

I have just discovered last night, with the help of Jerry Kuhnhausen’s book I have just received, that my crane is sprung. When I close the cylinder, I have to apply thumb pressure to the cylinder (pushing to the right) so that the latch and latch pin will move forward and secure the cylinder. I suspect that this is why the cylinder rotation is so hard. With the cylinder open, the double action trigger pull is smooth. With the cylinder closed, I have to pull harder on the trigger. I am surprised that the gun is still in time.

Wish me luck. With Jerry Kuhnhausen’s instructions, I am going to try and fix the sprung crane myself.

Jeff
 
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