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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do we have any members who restore original boxes or know someone who does that sort of thing. I have a 1908 Hammerless box that is deteriorated and delaminating.
 

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I was talking with Bailey Brower - the guy who wrote the book on the Savage auto pistols - and we disussed the original boxes and their relative scarcity and their usually poor condition when found.

He'd said that they'd used a high-sulpher-content cardboard back then, and essentially, the boxes started their slow deterioration upon assembly.

Throw in a few decades and different climates, and it's no wonder that while one can find an exceptional Savage - it's box has usually been thrown away because it 'died'.

Boxes got better built in the 1950s and later - but manufacturing technologies changed, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just saw on the other post that the antique box guy $75 an hour and usually takes 8 hours for the work. Think I will get some Elme'rs and go at it myself. Or just live with it.
 

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I just saw on the other post that the antique box guy $75 an hour and usually takes 8 hours for the work. Think I will get some Elme'rs and go at it myself. Or just live with it.
That's essentially what I did with 1950's and earlier Lionel train boxes in my collection. If you are careful and patient, it's hard to tell that a repair has been performed!
 

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Elmer's Glue works very well for repairing/restoring pistol boxes. I've been using it for years. I also use a little contact cement from time to time. Small, cheap, children's "artist" paint brushes are good for applying the Elmer's. I used to get them at the Michael's craft store, but had to order my last batch direct from the manufacurer. Some other things that are handy in repairs are small plastic clamps, a strap type picture frame jig, small scissors, tweezers and rubber bands. It's not difficult to do some pretty good repairs. "Restoration", however, is more difficult. The main problem is the lack of paper that closely resembles the original. I've been searching for years for a good match for the paper that Colt used in their pre-war boxes and have never found anything close. The best I have been able to do is to use small pieces removed from a really beat-up un-repairable box that is similar to the one I am trying to repair.
It's good be be patient when doing box repair. Do a little work and let the glue set up overnight and then do a little more. Trying to do too much at once will usually result in having to do it all over again.
Good luck and have fun with it!
- - Buckspen
 

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Hey, there's a guy in my neck of the woods that'll sell you a "geniune" brand newbie carton with label and everything.:mad:
 
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