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What is the consensus regarding collectability / desirability of bright nickel vs. Royal Blue Pythons? I am talking about 2 identical guns with the only difference being the finish.

Just curious.
 

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In which finish were the LEAST number of guns made? I think you know the answer to that one-and which finish will carry the higher price-ALL other factors being equal as you stated.

Bud
 

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Typically the nickel Pythons go for an average of $200.00 more in Michigan. They are also very hard to keep spotless and are very prone to nicks and scratches but they are sure easy to look at... On the other hand, the blue Pythons are 2nd to none in terms of the quality and class of the bluing plus they are eye candy as well...

So, all being equal the nickel will bring more bang for your buck... Ascetically, that's a call only you can make...

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A lot of this depends on WHERE the gun is being sold.
Some parts of the country a nickel Python sells like hot cakes, and in some other areas you can't give away a nickel pistol.

The Blue Python is THE classic, and up until the last few years usually brought more money.

Up until recently, a lot of people believed that Colt nickel plated Pythons that had a defective polish job.
The idea went, that a polisher had an "Oops" so they plated it to "cover up" the defect.
For this reason the "Factory second" nickle Pythons brought lower prices.

That BS seems to have been dying out the last few years, and the nickel Pythons are at or slightly more valuable than the blued versions prices.

Still, in some parts of the country it's harder to sell a nickel gun of any sort and a Python even more so, thus, lower prices.
 

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I agree with Dwheel as some places it's next to impossible to get rid of nickel guns. Back when I hard on the hunt to make a Snake collection I ran across a NIB Viper for a decent price. I walked on by with no more than a curious glance as it was nickel even though the nickel models are more expensive. That dealer kept that revolver for quite a while.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
The Blue Python is THE classic

[/ QUOTE ]

That deserves a lot of exclamation points!

Interesting point you make about nickel sales in different parts of the country. I can only guess this is true for all nickel pistols and not just the Python.
 

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Just going BY prices for 98-100% condition pieces,Nickle versions WILL bring more -- to the "serious collector",looking to round out a collection.

While I agree,somewhat, about the regional preferences,asking prices seem to bear out the Nickle's higher tarrif.

BUT-this is ONLY for TOP END guns!! A nickled gun with 10% of its finish missing,will usually look like hell compared to a 90% blued version. I am talking overall wear here,NOT just one "big zit or stain".

Flayderman has pointed this out numerous times; the blued guns tend to develop a patina on the worn areas that BLENDS in to the remaining finish. The nickled ones have their worn areas stand out like flashing blue lights,at least in my opinion.

Of course,certain models WERE very rare in Nickel,like the New Service,where estimates are 5% ORIGINAL,and that % tended to be in the 1898-1910 period production,so there is a premium.

Finally figured out WHY I am starting to look for "hi end " ORIGINAL Colts & Smiths in nickle!! I miss CHROME on cars!
Yeah,"dumb",I know,but I grew up with cars in the 50's/60's that had REAL "bumpers",emblems etc.-and enjoyed polishing these!

Bud /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif
 

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We see very few nickel revolvers in Florida. Perhaps it's just us, but most of our collector quality guns come from up north retirees dumping them for a Keltec protection gun, or to keep them out of the hands of the grandkids.

Best one we have found is a new in the presentation case Model 29 4" Smith with tools.

Yeah Bud, I'm an oldy, and fondly miss the fifties, and 60's chrome laden cards. Talk about stuck on stupid. I bought an 58 Edsel Pacer with the electric push button shift in the center of the steering wheel. Out of all the new cars I have owned, that one is remembered more than most others. It was hard to beat drag racing at night on our country roads in Pa.
 

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Surprised you haven't run across any of those 5" Nickled Trooper .357 OMs that the Florida Highway Patrol had(along with a "few" VERY rare nickled M-28 S&Ws).

Nickle WAS chosen due its better protection ability from humidity corrosion.

Got mine at a small shop up here in Maine. Florida trooper had retired up here to live with his daughter, He became "senile" and she sold the gun,which was wearing rubbers,to the shop. They never took the Pachs off-nor did the 5" bbl. stand out to them-BUT I knew. Never told shop owner,but he did give me ex-troopers daughter's name,as he she was a "looker",recently divorced,and had some "need" for someone to help "train" her Doberman. That's as far as we will take this story!!

Edsels: NOTHING mechanically wrong with those cars,any more than Fords,Mercs. etc. of that era,as they used the same motors etc. Friends grandad got one of the first in late 57'
. "Forgot" that HORN was NOT in center of steering wheel-BLEW HORN as he was driving st some kids playing in the road to warn them! You can guess what happened to the transmission!! An idea as screwed up as the Chrysler swing out bucket seats(that stayed out!),the 45 RPM Mopar record player(bumpy roads!) and the photoelectric cell day nite rear view inside mirror-which gave a great "strobe" effect driving down a street with many street lights!

Bud
 
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