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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I bought this rusty old ground dug bayonet at a small shop in Arcanum, Ohio a week ago. Over all length including the hinge portion is about 12 1/4 inches. I'm a sucker for unusual stuff. Price wasn't too bad for this rusty piece of metal at $10. So I've done some detective work this past week and think I have it identified as originally having been attached to an old British Blunderbuss from the late 1700's.
In talking with the shop owner, he said it came from the estate of Tony DeRegnaucourt from Arcanum. Tony did a lot of archeological work at the old fort located at Greenville, Ohio as well as other late 1790's military sites. When Tony passed about 9 years ago, much of his personal collection was sold off to the four winds.
Here are some photos I snatched off the internet of an original old Blunderbuss as well as the relic bayonet I purchased:
Kim
 

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Most of the British blunderbusses that I've seen had the folding bayonet on top of the barrel, right behind the flared muzzle. That left the ramrod in the usual position, right below the barrel. This one was made by Thomas Archer of Birmingham, England, between 1776 and 1807. By 1808 he operated as “Archer & Son” until closing in 1818. I did some minor restoration on it. The part-octagon brass barrel measures 14-1/2” from muzzle to breach plug. The flared muzzle is 1-13/16” in outside diameter, and the rear portion of the octagon section is 1-5/16” flat to flat. At the muzzle the inside diameter is 1-5/16”, tapering down to a bore diameter of 0.906” (=6.27 Gauge). The overall length from muzzle to buttplate is 29-5/8”.

As can be seen, it either had NO bayonet, or had some type of clamped on bayonet now missing.
 

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I've seen several blunderbuss pistols with folding bayonet, usually mounted under the barrel on the wooden forestock. That way it would clear the barrel flare when it deployed. The spring-loaded bayonet folds back and the tip catches under the front of the trigger guard to hold it in place. Pull back on the trigger guard to release the bayonet and it springs forward. Ingenious, and lots of fun to play with.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Great information and great pictures!

I have some other rusty relics but this bayonet is in pretty bad shape. Should I leave it as is and put it on the shelf or is there some sort of spray or brush on liquid that I could apply that would stop any more deterioration. I suspect if I put the wrong thing on it, it will fall to pieces.
Kim
 

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mentalapse, that is a beauty of a blunderbuss! The fitment of the lock plate is impressive. On so many of these 1700's flint guns, the lock plates are very loose in their inletted wood locations. Some are so loose that one has to wonder if the plate is original, or a replacement that doesn't fit well.
 
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