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So I am watching the 1932 movie, "When the West was Young." Not one buscadero rig and everyone had a Colt. While I am familiar with old Colt SAA leather, I have yet to figure out when and why everyone in the movies and TV started using the buscadero?
 

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Late 1940's - they were carved to beat Hell and fitted the slim, tailored hips of the hero perfectly - just like his saddle.

Meanwhile, the supporting cast was wearing 'real' rigs and clothing, and riding period hulls.
 

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Yes, it was mainly in the movies where the buscadero rigs were used and thought by the public as the correct rigs of the old west period. However it was the "flap holster ", the California pattern holster " and later the " Mexican loop " rigs that were the ones actually used. Worn at waist level, as against half way down the thigh, there was less chance of losing the gun when riding a horse or squatting down !
Much more practical !
Jim
 

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Yes, it was mainly in the movies where the buscadero rigs were used and thought by the public as the correct rigs of the old west period. However it was the "flap holster ", the California pattern holster " and later the " Mexican loop " rigs that were the ones actually used. Worn at waist level, as against half way down the thigh, there was less chance of losing the gun when riding a horse or squatting down !
Much more practical !
Jim
I feel the say way! When I got a little older watching Cowboy movies on TV (we got our first TV in 1953) with my dad. He was the one that go me interested in Cowboy movies and TV shows. I always thought the "gunslingers" only wore them for fast draw. I wondered even them how the heck did they ride a horse comfortably with the revolver hanging so low, LOL! Dad explained to me that they should be high on waist so they can be gotton out quick and still be comfortable. He went on tell me that the best way to wear the holster is "cross draw".....easy to get to and fast drawing, and comfortable. I still wear most of mine that way today. Dad was a little smarter than I thought sometime, LOL!
 

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My experience is the same as Abwehr`s, time frame too. Towards the end of my working years I started wearing suspenders color coded with our uniform shirts to help keep things up. I know supervision probably didn't like it but by then I had the whiskers and was there when they hired in and knew their old sins and knew where the body's were buried so I was left alone.
Weight came with age. If I tried to wear my old Sam Brown belts without keepers like the westerns show the strong side holster and gun hanging down 5"`s lower than the other side I would loose my rig within three steps! It looks very uncomfortable. When I first started out I did wear cross-draw for the first year or so. I guess I probably changed due to the fact I was the only one that I worked with that did. If you look at all the authentic old western pictures of cowboys, lawmen etc., the vast majority wore their guns high and tight like we still do. Years ago the only one exception was Motor Officers liked a dropped swivel holster with the flap. I never trusted the swivel as I once had one break. The Buscadero rig I believe is strictly a Hollywood invention. Looks impressive is all. I do like the floral engraved rigs though especially in two toned brown and burnt red brown looking. If a LEO showed up with one today they would send him home!
 

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The Buscadero wasn't a hollywood creation,Commador Perry Owen was a gunman during the Graham Tewksberry feud here in AZ in the last part of the 1890's & wore one,then Walt Coburn wrote about survivors of the Johnson County war drifting in to Malta Montana in the very early 1900's,wearing "low slung tied down holsters".His family founded the famous "circle C ranch just outside Malta,he was about 13 @ the time,he lived well into the 60's & wrote several articles for True Wast mag. His family knew Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid because they would sometimes visit the circle C.
 

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Perry Owen carried a 10 inch barreled Colt in his. I've read of a 1890's Texas Ranger who used a drop loop holster. He wanted to always know where his pistol was in case he had to draw. From what I've read, most people preferred to be able to slide their holster to a more comfortable position at times.
 

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The Buscadero wasn't a hollywood creation,Commador Perry Owen was a gunman during the Graham Tewksberry feud here in AZ in the last part of the 1890's & wore one,then Walt Coburn wrote about survivors of the Johnson County war drifting in to Malta Montana in the very early 1900's,wearing "low slung tied down holsters".His family founded the famous "circle C ranch just outside Malta,he was about 13 @ the time,he lived well into the 60's & wrote several articles for True Wast mag. His family knew Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid because they would sometimes visit the circle C.
Jim,

That is great information! I had always thought it was the early movies. Since I am not a fast draw expert like you, I will just keep wearing the old style holster & belt and shoot crossdraw, LOL!
 

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I don't claim to be an expert, but I believe one situation where the "Buscadero" was used would be on a belt with two rows of loops. I don't believe they were too common because I've only seen them a couple of times.
 
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